“We would like to know what happened”

According to an Irish Times report the European Commission want a word in Slovakia’s shell-like about that explosives incident earlier this week. And in a separate report Daniel McLaughlin, in Budapest, notes further discrepancies in the Interior Ministry’s version of events

One of the key questions surrounds how and why the pilot of the Dublin-bound flight was allowed to take off with some 96g of high-grade plastic explosives on board. The Slovak interior ministry insists the explosives were not a safety risk because they were in a stable condition and not linked to a detonator. It also claimed that before take-off “the pilot of the plane was contacted via airport tower . . . The pilot evaluated the situation as not dangerous and he took off with the plane.”

However, both Danube Wings and Czech Airlines – from whom Danube Wings leased the Boeing 737-400 and crew – insist the pilot was not told he had explosives on his aircraft. “According to the current findings, the crew was only informed by the control tower while taxiing before take-off that a harmless box had been left after the exercise in one of the checked bags in the hold, which did not compromise the safety of the flight and contained a scent track for dog training,” said Czech Airlines spokeswoman Hana Hejskova.

That still doesn’t explain why the telex message sent to Dublin airport was ignored

The telex sent to Servisair reads: “Dear Colleagues, please be informed that we have received info from police department of (Tatry Airport) that there is forgotten sample of explosive material in baggage on bord of flight no V58230.”

“The sample of grey colour is in plastic bag (size 5x5cm) in the rare part of black backpack (under harnesses) in hold no 3 or 4. The sample is not dangerous, it is only used for dog training. It is not able to cause explosion nor fire (no power source of detonator is included) Pilot in command has been informed about this sample by ATC (air traffic control). We would like to kindly ask you to return that sample with flight no V58231. Thx for coop.”

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  • joeCanuck

    Circling the wagons to shift the blame elsewhere. People should have already been fired .

  • Eleanor Bull

    Did Dublin send it back as requested? Who took it? Were they charged excess baggage? How much extra does Ryanair charge per kilo of explosive?

  • scruff

    It seems extraordinary that they wanted it returned to them on another flight !

  • louise price

    This incident proves what a joke airport security is in general. Physical searches/body scans etc are a charade to make the public feel safe. In reality it is all too easy to breach the sterile zones. Allan Kessing, ex-Australian Customs & whistleblower, gave this recent interview:
    http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/stories/s2781998.htm