Stormont’s Crises struggle on

The row over policing and justice seems to be continuing. Shaun Woodward suggested that the devolution of policing and justice was “the final part of the jigsaw” and it “send a signal of confidence to the world” whereupon economic investment from the United States would inevitably follow after an agreement had been reached.
“Never forget there are 42 million Irish Americans who want to invest in the shared future of Northern Ireland,” he said. “America wants to put its money where their hearts truly rest, to create jobs and opportunity for those with whom they have the deepest and strongest ties.”

This was rubbished by Gregory Campbell: “No inward investor here raises any sort of precondition to coming here over policing and justice. They ask about wages, labour relations, power costs, no one mentions policing and justice.”

Campbell again suggested that the central problem with devolution of P&J was arranging a suitable financial package “We want to do it (devolve policing) when we have the resources to deliver. Sinn Fein need to say how they can justify proceeding without getting those resources.”

Meanwhile following McGuinness’s attack on him: “I have to record my annoyance at the fact I have not been able to develop a close working relationship with Peter Robinson. That is through no deficiency or lack of effort on my part.” Robinson countered: “I am not going to play his game by responding in kind.” He did, however, suggest that Sinn Fein might be trying to force or threaten a Stormont election: asked by the News Letter whether he believed Mr McGuinness was trying to force a crisis in the Executive, Mr Robinson said: “A blind man on a galloping horse can see what he is doing.”
As the News Letter article points out an election might deliver Sinn Fein a larger umber of seats than the DUP, provided the TUV and UUP take DUP seats. However, a blocking minority of TUV MLAs would be exactly what the TUV want and would ensure no P&J devolution in the remotely near future.

  • Thereyouarenow

    Peter Robinson said
    “a blind man on a galloping horse can see what he is doing”

    In my opinion a blind man on a galloping horse would be hanging on for dear life. like Peter is hanging on to the leadership of the DUP.

  • DC

    This was rubbished by Gregory Campbell: “No inward investor here raises any sort of precondition to coming here over policing and justice. They ask about wages, labour relations, power costs, no one mentions policing and justice.”

    Probably generally right, except the Americans.

  • andrew white

    Probably generally right, except the Americans.
    Posted by DC on Oct 01, 2009 @ 12:35 PM

    the americans have been investing here for years, strange this is only an issue for them now.

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    andrew white,

    There was of course the Mc Bride principles.

    re. Crisis

    The finiancial ‘crisis’ is a straw man’ for the DUP – there will be ‘crisis talks’ and the money will be magiced up just like Unionist confidence.

    More Handbags.

  • andrew white

    sammy we dont have the mcbride principles and americans still invested and i know a lot of people would gladly tell the yanks to stick their dollars where the sun dont shine.

    Stormont is on its last legs and will anyone notice or care?

  • Itwas SammyMcNally whatdoneit

    andrew,

    I was replying to your remark below – Mc Bride principles are an example of where the yankies did give due concern previously.

    “the americans have been investing here for years, strange this is only an issue for them now”

  • Greenflag

    ‘“America wants to put its money where their hearts truly rest, to create jobs and opportunity for those with whom they have the deepest and strongest ties.” ‘

    So that would explain why China has been attracting most US investment capital over the past two decades ? Admittedly the Irish Republic has attracted a huge amount of investment over the same period but this has been due in part to having a more favourable tax regime than other
    locations.

    Both Woodward and Campbell are partially right but mostly wrong .

    American investors no less than any others will be looking at tax rates , wage levels , skills availability and market size and ease of access . They will also be looking for longer term political stability . Many will know and have heard about Northern Ireland’s previous troubles. They won’t care much about the past but they will care about a ‘stable ‘ future prospect and a stable ‘currency ‘ i.e one that’s not going to ‘devalue ‘ their investment within a couple of years .

    Most will look at NI and then look elsewhere.

  • DC

    Well Andrew let’s try and remain relevant to the Americans, at the moment perhaps NI isn’t at the forefront of USA investment. Might be better to act like a peacock and show some nice attractive feathers; but why is it Unionists only seem to be able to show two-fingers to such potentially useful economic partners.