Sinn Féin come to terms with partition?

With conflicting views being expressed from within the party on the reasons behind Sinn Féin’s poor Irish General Election performance, the party leader Gerry Adams has repeated his opinion that the party’s expectations were unrealistically high – whilst now acknowledging that “the party vote fell in some crucial areas” – and, while stating that the internal analysis will continue, he has been making some suggestions as to how the party, north and south, will attempt to address the problems

He said: “Sinn Fein is an Ireland party, operating in two jurisdictions, with their own political cultures and different political realities that have developed since partition. What we are attempting to do is unprecedented. We need to build republicanism in both parts of Ireland, making it relevant to the political conditions in which they live while at the same time winning support for an end to partition.”

It could be seen as a tacit acceptance of Anthony McIntyre’s analysis – but what does it mean for any single Party policy?

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  • Glen Taisie

    Priorities should be

    1.Keep the beard off RTE
    2.Dump Mary Lou
    3.Merge with Fianna Fail

  • Why on earth is Gerry Adams saying his party needs to build republicanism in the Republic of Ireland? That means they’re trying to build something that’s already there…

    I mean, imagine British Labour or the Tories saying they wanted to build Monarchism in England (and even there the comparison’s perfect, as there are far more republicans in England as there are monarchists in Ireland.)

    With that level of ignorance towards what the Irish public already support and accept, it’s no wonder that Sinn Féin fared as they did in the recent election.

  • parcifal

    all SF can do is try to build electoral support, however INMO the partition of Ireland is a psychological problem, and so an answer is to be found deep within the psyche of the Green and Orange.

  • Roisin

    Pete,

    “but what does it mean for any single Party policy?”

    I don’t know that’s it’s necessary or even feasible to have identical policies for two differing jurisdictions.

    Principles are separate to policies, and the principles should be the same. The policies north and south need to be consistent with the principles, rather than identical to each other.

  • “We need to build republicanism in both parts of Ireland, making it relevant to the political conditions in which they live while at the same time winning support for an end to partition”.
    Gerry Adams.

    To have duel platforms for the SF party in the north and south would be a disaster and would end with the party either splitting or organizing separately in the two jurisdictions.

    If the program is good enough for the north it is good enough for the south, if it needs to be cut and pasted it is no good for either jurisdictions. SF is either an all Ireland party or it is nothing, thus its core platform whether it is tax, social services, war on poverty, foreign policy must be the same throughout the island.

    The fact that Adams is still touting this type of rubbish after the setback in the 2007 election shows he has not learnt a dam thing. For SF to accept a duel platform is accepting the permanence of partition and the electorate will quickly cotton on to the fact that all SF’s propaganda says otherwise and vote accordingly

  • GavBelfast

    Having adopted and now implementing SDLP policy, in effect if not always in generosity and spirit, what can they do up here?

    In the South, the thing is widely viewed as settled (a number of FF ministers and opposition politicians have said this), so not sure what they can do there either. Do they matter there?

  • curious

    Why dont Gerry seek advice from the Green Party. They are the only all Ireland party to have representatives in both governments North & South.

  • sammaguire

    I didn’t vote for them myself but I am bemused by this talk of SF’s poor election result. True they lost a seat but the truth is their first preferences were up by a massive 18%.
    It’s settled for maybe 20 years Gav. The ultimate solution is some sort of joint sovereignty. This is probably in the interest of Unionists as there probably will be a nationalist majority in the North within say 30/40 years if demographic changes continue. Most people down here still would love some sort of united Ireland but the main thing for the present is that the violence has stopped and hopefully will never return.

  • CTN

    From 1973 – “Year of Victory” to 2007 “needing to win support for an end to partition”

    What type of insight have past republican leaderships offered and what evidence do SF have today that they can advance a united Ireland, can they obtain speaking rights for nationalists in the Dail, have they made progress on a discussion paper for unity from FF- what about this unionist veto over north/south expansion- have they lobbied to have PRSI numbers made available to he republican community, house sales registered in the land registry/registry of deeds in Dublin.

    Its the same old talk but lets see the solid matter before we can indulge the Adams fantasy.

  • Frank Sinistra

    curious,

    The Greens are not in government in the north. Not even close.

  • kensei

    “To have duel platforms for the SF party in the north and south would be a disaster and would end with the party either splitting or organizing separately in the two jurisdictions.”

    This is nonsense. Partition means that policies have to be tailored North and South, but it is good politics anyway to devolve power a bit. Centralisation is out kids, as anyone who watched the clinking fist today will have noticed.

    What it means for single party policy is fairly straightforward. The ideology and the goals should remain constant, but the policy that implements those goals is different. A trivial example: if SF had have stuck with their 17% Corporation tax rate, it would have meant supporting cutting taxes in the North and raising them in the South. There should be a little leeway in having everything exactly matched up but the general direction should be harmonised. It is far more sensible than the policy they are currently pursuing anyway.

    No doubt there will be arguments between North and South, but all parties have divisions, and many have worse. The quality of the leadership is if they can sort those out, but there really is no problem at a fundamental level.

  • CTN

    Some good points from both Mick and Ken- I don’t think you guys are as far apart as it seems.

    One problem they do have Ken- that we have already discussed to death is convincing voters of the viability of their economic policies- especially in Dublin.

  • dublinsfsupporter

    The next leader should be from the 26 counties.

    Nationalist people in the six counties are happier with a southern leader than people in the 26 counties are with a northern leader. Therefore it makes sense that the next leader should be from the 26 counties (e.g. Pearse Doherty or Mary Lou or Caoimhghin O’Caolain with in the north someone like Conor Murphy or Martina Anderson taking over as Deputy First Minister in the six counties being the effective local leader in that area.

  • CTN

    Question is Dub- after all the years of askin Paisley would griz be prepared to share power?

  • CTN

    I must bid you all a good night guys and girls for I’m of to hit the hay.

    If anyone wants a reply to their comment about my blog I will not be able to do so until re-emerging from slumber…

    Nighty nighty,

    CTN

  • CURIOUS

    [b]The Greens are not in government in the north. Not even close.[/b]

    Oh but yes they are Frank Sinatra.

    Greens take first seat in Northern Ireland Assembly
    http://www.greens-in.org/article/834

  • Frank Sinistra

    Curious,

    Having a seat is not being in government. The DUP, SF, UUP and SDLP are in government. APNI, the Greens, PUP and Deeney are not.

    This is very basic stuff.

  • The Dubliner

    “But this applies to all Provos. The procceeds of a senior footbasll match in Casement Park were stolen yesterday. Top suspects have to be Sinn Fein, who have actually murdered inter county players as part of their campaign. Sinn Fein have been paid off. Now they should do the right thing, realise they are a rump party no one wants to know and f–k off into the oblivion of history.” – Gerry Kelly

    Considering that PIRA’s Chief-of-Staff, Thomas Murphy, is ranked No 1 in the BBC’s Underworld Rich List under the category of “UK’s Richest Smugglers” (a category that took no account of 46 million euro worth of property seized by the Crinimal Assets Bureau in Manchester in 2005 which it is claimed is part of his property portfolio), you’d wonder why these highly organised crinimals they bother with small change. After all, it’s not like PIRA’s Brian Storey (Head of Intelligence) stole 25 million in sterling from the Northern Bank exclusively for his own use: the spoils of crinimal enterprise would have been devided up among the top dogs of PSF/PIRA. Indeed, that handy 25 million that senior PIRA’s leaders Brian Keenan and Padraig Wilson extracted from the Columbian drug-peddlers and terrorists, FARC, must have gone some way to paying for those holiday homes. Add up the untaxed wealth accumulated from bank robberies, extortion rackets, smuggling, propery and business investments, etc, and you’re looking at political leaders who are among the wealthiest gangsters in Europe and are certainly the wealthiest political leaders in Ireland.

    The best thing that PSF could do to advance the cause of Irish unity (a cause that they have retarded by several generations) is disband. However, there is too much money, power, and social status at stake for sociopaths to “do the right thing” alas.

  • Roisin

    “Indeed, that handy 25 million that senior PIRA’s leaders Brian Keenan and Padraig Wilson extracted from the Columbian drug-peddlers and terrorists, FARC, must have gone some way to paying for those holiday homes.”

    You are Michael McDowell and I claim my 5% finder’s fee.

  • Southern Observer

    ”Why dont Gerry seek advice from the Green Party. They are the only all Ireland party to have representatives in both governments North & South.”
    Are they in govt. in the North?

  • Sammy

    Dubliner

    Care to enlighten us as to who Brian Storey is?

  • CURIOUS

    ‘Having a seat is not being in government. The DUP, SF, UUP and SDLP are in government. APNI, the Greens, PUP and Deeney are not.”

    Frank, all 108 MLA’s have a voice in the Stormont assembly. SF do not have a voice in the Dail. Thats the difference between a NI de’honte type (assembly) government and a majority type government in ROI.

  • curious

    Are they in govt. in the North

    Southern Observer,
    The government in the North is “Unicameralism”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicameral

    All 108 MLA’s participate one way or another. The DUP, SF, UUP and SDLP only make up the 10 higher offices but the, APNI, the Greens, PUP and Independants all take part in numerous other assembly committees.

  • CURIOUS

    The government in the North is “Unicameralism”
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unicameral

    See here:
    Northern Ireland Assembly
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_Ireland_Assembly

  • kensei

    “All 108 MLA’s participate one way or another. The DUP, SF, UUP and SDLP only make up the 10 higher offices but the, APNI, the Greens, PUP and Independants all take part in numerous other assembly committees.”

    They aren’t in government. Only the parties in the Executive are in government.

  • kensei

    ““Unicameralism” ”

    That just means it is a single chamber. It doesn’t mean that everyone in it is in government. To be in government generally means you need to exercise Executive power.

  • curious

    ‘They aren’t in government. Only the parties in the Executive are in government.’

    The single green MLA in Stormont has a voice, wheras the 4 SF TD’s in the Dail do not have a voice.

    Furthermore SF is up shit creek in the ROI. Not one of the two main parties FF &FG would ever think of sharing power in a coalition with them.

  • kensei

    “The single green MLA in Stormont has a voice, wheras the 4 SF TD’s in the Dail do not have a voice.”

    They do have a voice, they just don’t have automatic speaking rights. It isn’t relevant to the question of being in government or not. If you say the Greens are in Governemt in the North, you could also say FG are in government South – they do have speaking rights. But you are wrong on both counts.

    “Furthermore SF is up shit creek in the ROI. Not one of the two main parties FF &FG would ever think of sharing power in a coalition with them. ”

    “Ever” is a long time. Particularly when talking about political parties. A violent past is not going to remain a barrier forever, as long as it remains in the past. There is a fair chance it’ll be less of an issue next time round. Enough for people to deal? That would depend on the state of the Dail.

  • slug

    The term “in government” is rather loose and can include participation in law-making (legislation).

    Therefore MPs and MLAs are in the legislative branch of government, but not in the executive branch. Thus they are in government.

    This is basic stuff.

  • kensei

    “The term “in government” is rather loose and can include participation in law-making (legislation).

    Therefore MPs and MLAs are in the legislative branch of government, but not in the executive branch. Thus they are in government.

    This is basic stuff. ”

    It is, but in both the Republic and UK’s systems typically membership of the legislature is not enough in itself to qualify as “in government”. It’s linked to the application of Executive power. Labour is in government because they control the legislature and weld executive power. The Greens are in government South because they are part of a coalition that has the same. Best example? The SNP does not control the legislature but is considered in government in Scotland because it controls the Executive branch.

    The Alliance, the Greens and Independents are not in government here, any more than the Conservatives are in England, or FG in the South.

  • Dublin SF watcher

    Dublin SF Supporter writes:

    “Therefore it makes sense that the next leader should be from the 26 counties (e.g. Pearse Doherty or Mary Lou or Caoimhghin O’Caolain”

    Unless it’s O’Caolain, and it won’t be, that change would be purely cosmetic as Doherty and Mary Lou are both Adams loyalists and political centrists.

    The disgruntled socialist republican grassroots in the south–which includes most of the Dublin activists–would not be placated by such a changeover but it’s hard to see who their alternative would be (the figure with the most cache among these members, Aengus O’Snodaigh, would probably be ruled out on the grounds of being uncharismatic and a poor public speaker).

  • CTN

    DSFW- that leaves Ferris or Arthur Morgan as possibilities.

    Have you heard about any more resignations of these disgruntled Dublin grassroots, I imagine there is a lot of anger at grizzler’s goof ups.

  • You are Michael McDowell and I claim my 5% finder’s fee.

    Posted by Roisin

    Nice one Róisín, you cheered me up greatly.

  • Dublin SF watcher

    CTN, I have not heard of resignations but we shall see after the election review is completed–if the leadership tries to white-wash the results, expect a few more walk-outs.

    Can’t see Ferris or Morgan as 26-Co leader either. Wrong generation.

  • curious

    Shinners told to stay up North and get on with it
    By John A Murphy

    DEBACLE is not too strong a word for Sinn Fein’s electoral performance, especially when set against the party’s expectations and arrogant predictions. How did we all come to accept the glib talk of doubling their Dail seats, even trebling them ‘on a good day’?

    Last Easter Monday, Martin McGuinness said, “We have begun the countdown to a united Ireland . . . The story of this election will be the growth of the Sinn Fein vote, and the increased number of seats we will win in Leinster House.”

    http://www.independent.ie/unsorted/features/shinners-told-to-stay-up-north-and-get-on-with-it-690680.html

  • curious

    I had missed this piece, what ever ones politics, [and I do not agree with John A Murphy politics] it is one hell of an article, thanks for posting it up.

  • Rory (South Derry)

    Roisin & Mick Hucknall

    It takes very little to amuse you little (sell out) provies these days.

    Michael McDowell was a tramp but he had the measure of the so called provisional republican movement.

    Paudraig Wilson & Mr Keenan were only the tip of the iceberg.

    Spike Murray was smuggling everything he could get out of Romania from fags and drink to people, aided by a bunch of gangsters in South Derry(and they all know who they are)!!!!!

    The Slab was no match to the extortionists such as Eddie copeland, Carrot Head, Noel McCartney & co.

    Bobby Sands must be turning in his grave that he died for all these tramps

    Republicanism died a death in the Nineties and the vermon in Sinn Fein should do Real Republicans a favour and disband.

    Ireland would Prosper and no doubt unite without these gangsters.

    Sinn Fein – For Freedom & JUSTICE Please cease!

  • Rory (South Derry)

    Did I hit a raw nerve with the people smuggling?

    Do you think Booby Sands is proud of Spike and Co?

  • confused

    If Sinn Fein adopt different policies in the South and North does their republicanism compel them to call for the abolition of the British monarchy or do they ignore this as that is a matter for the British people notwithstanding they administer British rule under the Crown?

    I have yet to hear them call for abolition.

  • dublinsfsupporter

    “Doherty and Mary Lou are both Adams loyalists and political centrists. The disgruntled socialist republican grassroots in the south–which includes most of the Dublin activists–would not be placated by such a changeover but it’s hard to see who their alternative would be (the figure with the most cache among these members, Aengus O’Snodaigh, would probably be ruled out on the grounds of being uncharismatic and a poor public speaker).”

    I disagree about Aengus but would maintain that either Mary Lou nor Pearse are at this stage the best shot for next leader. You are speaking as though Sinn Féin has not been an electoral success; in fact it has been a phenominal success and Donegal looks highly promising next time. Perhaps you have become unreaslistic in your expectations. Politics isn’t easy. Gerry Adams has made it look easy but it isn’t.

  • dublinsfsupporter

    That should be “either Mary Lou or Pearse are at this stage the best shot for next leader”

  • Rory (South Derry)

    Dublinsupporter

    I think the Words you could best use to describe Aengus are:-

    A Thick, uneducated, Thug who is an embarassment!

    Fits in well with the rest!

  • Roisin

    Rory,

    Lead the charge. I’ll be right behind you.

  • dublinsfsupporter

    Arrant nonsense about Aengus.

    He holds a degree from UCD and has practised as a qualified teacher in Dublin.

  • Glen Taisie

    Former Republican POW Féilim O’hAdhmaill is backing Martin Hogan (Green Party) in the Seanad Elections.

    “They have gone away -you know”

    http://www.martinhogan.ie

  • Rory (South Derry)

    Dublin-Supporter

    Qualified Teacher – SO WHAT!

    When he opens his mouth he talks like 6 year old!

    BLAH BLAH BLAH Provo Shite!

    As for Arrogant nonsense – I AM NOT A MEMBER OF PROVISIONAL SINN FEIN!

  • kensei

    Sigh. Suspension of man and ball rule for SF members again, apparently.

  • The Dubliner

    “Care to enlighten us as to who Brian Storey is?” – Sammy

    It should have read Bobby Storey. Named under Parliamentary privilege as head of intelligence for PIRA. He is a leading organised criminal in NI, having stolen 25 million in public money from the Northern Bank exclusively for private gain (since the crime occurred post-ceasefire, after PIRA stopped ‘justifying’ such crimes as needed to fund their sectarian murder campaign). Crime for personal gain is the hallmark of criminals and criminal organisations such as PSF/PIRA.

  • Frank Sinistra

    Glen T,

    There seem to be a few people on Hogan’s list of supporters that don’t even have a vote. O’hAdhmaill? Doran? How many on his list didn’t graduate from Dublin or NUI?

    Also, why are SF and the Greens running candidates if the have policies rejecting the current Seanad set up and the University seats in particular?

  • CTN

    DSFW- thanx for the info- you could be right about more defections if certain probabilities prevail.

    If the Féilim O’hAdhmaill mentioned is one and the same as the former IRA prisoner then he has obviously left SF as they are running Pearse Doherty in that campaign.

    Adams is losing many of republicanism’s former pillars- is it true that Bernhard Fox has also left SF?

  • Frank Sinistra

    CTN,

    You clearly don’t understand the Seanad elections. Doherty is running in the Agriculture panel. Hogan is running for one of the University seats.

    Try google and informing yourself how the system works before assuming a split.

  • CTN

    Indeed there is a possibility that Felim has not left SF.

    Is it usual to endorse a candidate from another party in this strange type of electoral contest?- I honestly don’t know.

    Regardless, one more person is hardly a big mad split Frank- c’mon now don’t be so touchy…

  • CTN

    Has anyone even established that this is even the same ex IRA Féilim O’hAdhmaill yet?

    I ask again in case we continue profiling some non combatant to unfriendly sources…

  • Frank Sinistra

    CTN,

    With 56 votes SF require a trade off for Doherty, the Greens need similar to reach a quota/s.

    Both are bastardising party policy on the validity of the Seanad.

    Good luck to both as they prostitute themselves. I hope it works out.

  • CTN

    Thanx for the info, now enlighten me if you can about Mr O’hAdhmaill and the likelyhood of young Doherty’s election please.

  • curious

    “Care to enlighten us as to who Brian Storey is?” – Sammy

    [b]David Burnside (South Antrim) (UUP)[/b]

    ‘Sinn Fein-IRA are laughing at the British Government again. The Secretary of State knows the facts from his security information. He knows about Bobby Storey, head of intelligence, reporting to the army council. He knows about Adams, McGuinness, Keenan, “Slab” Murphy—top of the criminal rich list, with £32 million—Gillen and the rest. He knows who carried out the Northern bank robbery. It was the Provisional IRA. [b]It was Bobby Storey—Bobby Storey of Stormontgate, Bobby Storey of crime, Bobby Storey of Castlereagh’—[/b]

    http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmhansrd/vo050111/debtext/50111-16.htm

  • curious

    THE TROUBLE WITH GUNS
    Republican Strategy and the Provisional IRA
    by Malachi O’Doherty (1998)

    PROLOGUE

    One night in May 1995 in the Felons club, in west Belfast, an IRA man called Bobby Storey directed me into a corner for a quiet word. Bobby Storey is about six foot four and I am five foot two so I wasn’t about to argue. He was a human tower, and the hand he pressed against my chest was nearly as big as my chest itself. I have been asked many times if I am not afraid of being duffed up by the IRA for all the rude things I have said about them. I generally expect they won’t respond to me like that, but at that moment I was contemplating that this might be a breach with tradition.

    ‘I am not going to hit you, but I want to tell you that you are a slug,’ Storey said.

    I started to reply but he asked me to apply my energies instead to a consideration of the merits of his statement. ‘Shut your fucking mouth,’ he said.

    Bobby was angry with me because of a piece I had written for BBC Radio Ulster’s Talkback programme. The piece had described him as a former gunman, but did not name him. I wrote it as a follow-up to an article published by Liam Clarke in the Sunday Times.

    http://cain.ulst.ac.uk/issues/politics/docs/odoherty.htm

  • Cruimh

    “Bobby Storey is about six foot four”

    Strange how someone who would stand out in a crowd
    like this managed to escape the systematic execution of republicans supposedly organised by collusion – makes you wonder if collusion was anythng like as bad as it is cracked up to be.

  • “makes you wonder if collusion was anythng like as bad as it is cracked up to be.”

    Cruimh,
    Depends if you were Pat Finucane’s mum or Bobby’s I suppose.
    Come on Cruimh, if those who claim to represent the rule of law collude in murder, whether it is one or a 100 that is bloody serious, surly?

  • Cruimh

    Mickhall – if SF and the IRA should not be blamed because individuals within their ranks broke the law, then neither should the Government/system.
    Fact of the matter is – if collusion was officially sanctioned, then how come so few high ranking Shinners survived ? After all the Brits had people like Scap and Denis … the big wigs cannot ALL have been British agents ?

  • kensei

    “Mickhall – if SF and the IRA should not be blamed because individuals within their ranks broke the law, then neither should the Government/system. ”

    Please pay attention. These state killing people is several orders of magnitude worse than any political group. Moreover, the government has oversight and accountability responsibilities that an armed group simply does not have.

    “Fact of the matter is – if collusion was officially sanctioned, then how come so few high ranking Shinners survived ? After all the Brits had people like Scap and Denis … the big wigs cannot ALL have been British agents ?”

    This is a somewhat simplistic point. Killing the leaders of the movement almost certainly would have elicited a violent reaction, could have moved even more hardline position into a position of power. Typically governments aren’t interested in killing leaders unless absolutely necessary – high risk, unpredictable results, great chance of blowback.

  • trueverytrue

    CTN,

    Bernard Fox left sometime ago and was well covered in the press up here…then next thing you know he is detained by MI5 on his way back from holidays, which was also covered by the Irish News.

    The problem it left the leadership is how to smear someone of his standing, a man of true integrity.

    They tried hard and failed big.

  • unpredictable results

    Indeed kensei,

    The Israelis killed two of arafats most able deputies in the hope that corrupt, or pliable individuals such Abbas would float to the top of Fatah, instead they have ended up with hamas on their doorstep, whilst this might suit the israeli right it was not the plan of those who sent Barak’s military hit squad around the Med.

  • Cruimh

    “These state killing people is several orders of magnitude worse than any political group.”

    I don’t think they WERE state killings – that’s not to say that individuals within the state did not abuse their position and break the law – for which they should be held accountable. But you cannot reasonably absolve SF and the IRA of responsibility for unauthorised things done by their members and at the same time say that because similar wrongs were done without official sanction then the British government is guilty.

  • kensei

    “I don’t think they WERE state killings – that’s not to say that individuals within the state did not abuse their position and break the law – for which they should be held accountable. But you cannot reasonably absolve SF and the IRA of responsibility for unauthorised things done by their members and at the same time say that because similar wrongs were done without official sanction then the British government is guilty.”

    You can. The state has oversight responsibility that the IRA or any other group does not have. If a large number of people or a department has went AWOL it is still the responsibility of the government – and negligence has taken down governments as surely as corruption. There are a number of allegations on collusion, and in the Finucane case that goes right to the level of the British Cabinet. What has been proven to date is toward the less serious end (of an extraordinarily serious set of offenses), but there is certainly grounds for suspicion and given the seriousness of the charges they certainly warrant further investigation.

  • ingram

    Kensei,

    You will find no government ministers prints on any collusion/ Agent wrong doing case!only Indians are at the coal face.

    Did the state sponsor terrorism?, without any doubt and that comes from somebody who was involved in that process.

    Let us not forget my old mate Jeff who went on National TV and ADMITTED to colluding with Nelson in the conspiracy to murder.His case was one of those decided upon by the state this week to not proceed to prosecution and he remains a serving PSNI Police officer.

    Did it work and was collusion effective ?? Yes, but at a great price.

    Was that price worth paying?? Depends whether you have any long term and strategic interests!

    Ding Ding

    Martin

  • CTN

    true- thanx for the info,

    I read he’d left but needed confirmation- he certainly had an enormous amount of respect within mainstream republicanism and was regarded very much as a pro-Adams project/peace process supporter during his involvement with SF…

    I’ve now finished with this thread and can’t reply to any comments on my blogs as its kinda all been said before…

    Good night,

    CTN

  • CNT

    You mentioned a [your?] blog on slugger can you let me have its web address.

    regards

    Mick Hall

  • CTN

    Mick- I discovered your request by accidentally accessing the wrong page, as I have finished with this blog- hence the notice above.

    I don’t even know what a [your?] blog is and hope someone hasn’t stolen my blog title.

    You can mail me at mytroubleshooter@hotmail.com – in this instance to clarify the situation as it is of the subject of this thread.

    Please restrict further correspondence or the much enjoyed Adams bashing (because it is fair and patriotic) to slug as I need use the mail address for work.

    Thanks

    CTN.

  • curious

    United Ireland ‘off the agenda’

    By Stephen Dempster POLITICAL EDITOR
    DUBLIN considers a united Ireland to be off the agenda for the next quarter of a century, the News Letter can reveal.

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news?articleid=2992568

  • Cruimh

    In which case the target will preumambly shift from the centenary of the Easter Rising to the centenary of the 31st Eucharistic Congress ? 😉

    http://multitext.ucc.ie/d/The_31st_International_Eucharistic_Congress_Dublin_1932

  • curious

    What about a 9th centenary to The Norman Conquest
    http://www.irelandseye.com/aarticles/history/events/dates/norman.shtm I wonder would 2069 be acceptable to SF?

  • Cruimh

    I don’t think that hits the spot Curious – it’s neither RC nor anglophobic.

  • curious

    What about a UI in 2090, a 4th centenary to King Billy and the Glourious Revolution. Even the OO might approve of this. After all Bertie and Big Ian were nearly kissing each other there lately were the sweet Boyne waters flow.

    Anyway Steven Dempster of the NL is confident it wont be for another 25 years at least. He has written another article on it.
    I only wish he would name these “senior Irish Government sources” instead of keeping them to himself.

    [B]UNITED IRELAND IS OFF THE TABLE FOR 25 YEARS[/B]

    By STEPHEN DEMPSTER

    SINN Fein aspirations for a united Ireland have been dismissed for the next quarter of a century by senior Irish government sources.

    The News Letter has been told by high-ranking Irish officials that they do not expect Northern Ireland’s constitutional position to be raised again for “20 to 25 years”.

    http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news?articleid=2992860

  • Cruimh

    By 2090 there will only be 4 states – Islamic America, Buddhist Asia, Christian Africa and Red Europe – and the regional centre for Ireland will be Westminster.