Z visa for illegal immigrants

Irish Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern is predicting a resolution to the long-running dispute over undocumented illegal immigrants in the US, naturally he’s focused on Irish illegal immigrants.. Futuring aside, it does seem as if some sort of compromise has been agreed.. although the actual bill hasn’t been voted on yet. The Professor has some links for the American reaction.. and Micky Kaus has a round-up. According to the PA report however

Under the plans, illegal immigrants will pay a fine, return to Ireland and then apply for the new proposed Z visa. Irish Foreign Affairs Minister Dermot Ahern said he was optimistic the end was now in sight for the plight of 30,000 illegal Irish residents in the States.

[Will that apply to other nationalities? – Ed] Adds Apparently so.. More links from the Professor here And Irish Times report

, ,

  • Phaidon

    Dermot Ahern is not alone on this one. SDLP South Down MLA PJ Bradley has commented on the latest news from the United States in relation to the plight of the ‘undocumented Irish’. Mr Bradley stated:

    “Today’s news from Washington on the Immigration issue is that the negotiators from both parties have settled on the details of a bipartisan plan that would grant legal status this year to all illegal immigrants in the USA. But the deal for the new named ‘Z Visas’ whilst broadly agreed still remains incomplete.

    The deadline for the necessary Senate Debate has been extended by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reed(D) until next Monday.

    What I have learned about the ‘Z Visa’ Bill if passed would start by giving every illegal immigrant probationary status. If the process continues, and that could take until the end of 2008, then illegal immigrants who qualify could get ‘Z Visas’. All participants would then have to pass a security test, pay a fine and a processing fee. Non English speakers would be faced with a proficiency test in English. The suspense remains but all is not lost”

  • foreign correspondent

    How can the govt support Irish illegals in the US and deport illegal ´non-nationals´ (horrible Newspeak expression!) from Ireland. Is there not a massive hypocrisy there?

  • fed up with the yanks

    The yanks are a bunch of scammers. Theres no chance of all these 30,000 illegals getting visas, at present there is a huge anti immigration wave in the united states. For example Homeland security has upped the anti for those travelling on holiday to the united states if they are exempt from the 90 day waiver. The US want to know if you have any convictions, AND if you have ever been arrested even if the arrest did not result in a prosecution. In other words if you have been arrested and let go because you are innocent, or found in a court of law to be innocent, they still want to know about it, and that could still bar you from visiting the US.

    Guess how many people in the lower shankill or falls have been arrested over the course of our recent history!!! You’ll need to appear before a consular officer for this you will pay one hundred dollars, to get an intervew, phone the US embassy at £1.50 per minute. YOu’ll need confirmation of your ARREST and conviction history from the PSNI (cost £10) and a wait of 40 days. Then download the various forms from their website, travel up to Danesford on the stranmillis road and wait around 4 hours even tho you had an appointment. There they will scan your fingertip and eye.
    Minor traffic offences (provided you have not appeared in court) are exempt, all other petty charges and ARRESTS not leading to a conviction have to be declared, or they will stop you at the point of entry.
    Don’t forget your photo, two inches square which will cost you a tenner, which you will have to give to them.

    Or say to them, fuck it and go somewhere else to spend your money.

  • Cahal

    There are plenty of people who spent the time and money to enter the US legally.

    Mr Fed up with the yanks

    “In other words if you have been arrested and let go because you are innocent, or found in a court of law to be innocent, they still want to know about it, and that could still bar you from visiting the US. ”

    Highly unlikely.

    “You’ll need to appear before a consular officer for this you will pay one hundred dollars, to get an intervew, phone the US embassy at £1.50 per minute.

    The call lasts 3 minutes. Thats 50+4.50 GBP.

    “YOu’ll need confirmation of your ARREST and conviction history from the PSNI (cost £10) and a wait of 40 days. ”

    See, crime doesn’t pay. Cost you ten quid.

    “Then download the various forms from their website, travel up to Danesford on the stranmillis road and wait around 4 hours even tho you had an appointment.”

    Never had to wait more than 10 minutes. BTW, people on mainland Europe or even GB often travel hundreds of miles to their nearest US embassy/consulate.

    “There they will scan your fingertip and eye. ‘

    I feel your pain.

    “Don’t forget your photo, two inches square which will cost you a tenner, which you will have to give to them. ”

    Ten quid. Err, you can get it done for 6.

    Thats a total of 70 quid to get a visa to enter a foreign country. For those who haven’t had a brush with the law it’ll cost 60 quid. Thats less than the fuel surcharge Aerlingus slap on to your ticket.

  • fed up with the yanks

    Cahal get a grip. The new rules came out round about the beginning of the year. One call to the embassy may cost £4.s0 when was the last time one call reserved a person an appointment? You could ring up every day for weeks and still not get an appointment, or you could be lucky and get one straight away, its the luck of the draw. One person told me it cost them £58, a bit different from £4.50 don’t ya think?

    Check the website of the embassy before you end up with egg all over your face, it clearly states, if you have been arrested even if it does not lead to a conviction then you need to declare it and appear before a consular officer. If the arrest (even if it did not lead to a conviction) was involvement in terrorism (ie the troubles) it could bar you from entry.

    The troubles were not crime, some saw it as a cause and did not benefit from it financially in any way. ( some like adams and mcguinness etc did, but not the ordinary foot soldier)

  • susan

    The crisis with the Irish illegals is not one of people entering the US illegally, but of people overstaying visas, often for many years, and living and working in the US when they have no legal right to do so.

    A huge percentage of the undocumented immigrated before the Celtic Tiger had reached full roar. Often they married other undocumented Irish, started small but successful businesses — landscaping, childcare, construction, etc. — and are now in a situation where their children are American citizens ensconsed in the American school system but they themselves remain in a shadow economy, unable to vote, unable to return to Ireland to visit aging parents, obtain driver’s licenses, etc.

    Breaking the law is seldom the wisest choice, particularly once children have entered the picture, but still and all I have a world of sympathy for these families and hope some accomodation is reached. Culturally and ecomically I do not think it is in the long term best interests of either Ireland or America to see the taps turned off on immigration, emigration and the various cross-pollinations etc. that result.

    Irish Americans who are loudly anti-immigration are sometimes startled to learn their own parents, grandparents, great-grans, etc. would have had almost no chance of immigrating legally under current American law. Other times, they could not care less — U.S. Congressman Peter King being a prominent example.

    Obviously, the problem of illegal immigration in general is enormously complex, with all sorts of implications on the American economy, educational systems, healthcare, post 9/11 security, etc., etc. etc. But it is an Irish problem as well, and the lion’s share of lobbying and getting concrete help to undocumented Irish families in America has been spearheaded by the Irish Lobby for Immigraiton Reform. The ILIR received a small grant from the Irish government and has been endorsed by most Irish political parties, but by and large it is all dedicated volunteers.

    THis is their website:
    http://www.irishlobbyusa.org/

    For those of us with friends and family immediately and directly affected by this issue, the website is a critical link, with the ILIR Blog and immigration updates being particularly helpful.

  • Lover-not-a-golfer

    Well said, Susan.

    Fed up with the Yanks: You are partially correct. An individual may be denied admission to the U.S. for admitting the essential elements of a crime, even if no conviction ever resulted. A number of people from Latin American countries have been caught out by this provision, by unwittingly admitting to immigration-service-approved doctors that they had consumed controlled substances in the past. However, there is nothing new about this, which has been law since at least 1996.

    Finally, the new proposed law provides some welcome relief for the undocumented, but for those on the receiving end of Federal law enforcement, life will become even more unbearable. We’re talking about resources to detain around 30,500 aliens per day, 18,000 more Border Patrol officers, 200 miles of vehicle barriers and 370 miles of fencing, 70 ground-based radar and camera towers along the southern border, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and support systems etc. etc.

    So its relief for some aliens, a declaration of war on others.