Celtic Tigers ravage Pakistan…

Or at least that’s what t’Manchester Guardian says… Not bad for a bunch of “Sunday Leaguers!!” Those figures, for those who missed it.

  • esmereldavillalobos

    Can I be the first on this thread to say….

    YEAHHHHHHHH!

  • Bill

    well done to Sky Sports for their excellent camera work and commentary. The commentator pointed out a red head who was in tears at the end of the Zimbabwe game, which was the work of an eagle eyed production team member, and he asked how everyone watching in Ireland was getting on. Fabulously would have been my guess. And to get 133 runs to Pakistan’s 132 from the allotted 47 overs. What a great day.

  • Mick Fealty

    Can we all come round to yours for the next match Bill?

  • against the head

    tut tut, Ireland are Participating in a lot of ‘Foreign’ sports these days! Rugby at Croke park and now the most English of all sports, Cricket! Ironic indeed.

  • Henry94

    True but as Declan Lynch pointed out in a perceptive piece about rugby a couple of weeks ago they don’t matter in the way soccer or GAA do.

    For the vast majority of people the county team and the International soccer team (and even your English premiership club) can break or make your day. Rugby isn’t like that. It’s mere sporting methadone.

    To prove it ask yourself who won the Heineken Cup the year before last. See?

  • against the head

    Are English or indeed Scottish soccer teams Irish
    ?
    ‘To prove it ask yourself who won the Heineken Cup the year before last. See? ‘
    I would assume these Munster fans would be huge Ireland fans as half the Irish side is made up of Munster players, thus I assume they will be just as gutted to see the international side underperform.

  • Mick Fealty

    All of these things are dynamic Henry. I was up early this morning watching premiership football, mostly to see how the players I’d picked for Chris’s fantasy league were doing. Maybe it is just me, but isn’t it getting duller and duller?

    By contrast, we had four passionate games yesterday full of skill and commitment. You get that week in, week out with GAA, but can you say the same for soccer?

  • ben

    The Irish cricket and Rugby teams are the best examples of cross-border bodies with executive powers. I love seeing Ireland succeed as a nation that celebrates the best of its traditions without any thought to any sort of sectarian or political unpleasantness. Red Hands of Ulster on GAA jerseys, shamrocks on cricket jumpers.

  • Ondine

    Good point – rugby and cricket show us that all-Ireland is the basis for success. Let’s see SF put that in their next election leaflet. 🙂

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    Maith sibh!

    That was a great result from St Lucia. To send one of ‘top’ teams home early is a massive boost for the so called minnows – where are you now, Mike Atherton? – and the Irish team deserve to be congratulated on that achievment.
    It makes me wonder whether or not they could do the same to England? First we had Stuttgart and then St Lucia!

    In passing, I’d like to point out that Lá Nua is getting regular reports directly from the Ireland camp from where a few enthusiastic cricketing Gaeilgeoirí are sending dispatches.

  • against the head

    Strange how northern nationalists are jumping on the cricket and rugby bandwagon. For decades catholic schools in the north have refused to coach these sports, presumably because they may be somehow linked to British culture and god forbid we have any of that in south armagh and west belfast!

  • Mick Fealty

    Not sure that it was refused. My lifelong fear of the cricket ball originates in one or two ad hoc sessions in which our PE teacher insisted on being the batsman. I recall him picking off chattering (bored) outfielders at will.

    And there are more than a few of our regular SF commenters that are also cricket heads.

  • CW

    I never thought I’d spend St Patrick’s night in an Irish pub in London with the punters fixated on a cricket match! Even weirder is the fact that Ireland won – in a rare sporting event where tricolours and red hand of Ulster flags were waved by people supporting the same team. Has to be a good sign!

  • against the head

    CW
    Absolutely. I think most Protestants are happy supporting\being part of an all ireland sporting side when their emblems\anthem\culture is embraced. At the moment I would be reluctant to bring an Ulster flag to an Ireland game in Dublin – I think that is something that needs to be worked on.

  • The Pict

    Who won the Heineken Cup in 1999?
    What did they bring to Lansdowne Road?

  • against the head

    hmm, i think that is slightly different the pict. Bringing Ulster flags to ulster matches has never been an issue – the last stand at landsdown was a more recent example than 1999, but when was the last time you saw one at an ireland game? I’ve seen the occasional one at away games, but never in dublin, even though several trainloads of fans head down for every game.

  • George

    Against the head,
    on bringing flags, from what I could see on the television the Northern Ireland fans were in one part of the stadium with their IFA, Northern Ireland and union flags while those from the Republic were in another with their tricolours, leprechauns, ROI jerseys and “we are the boys in Green”, “Fields of Athenry” of athenry chants.

    “For decades catholic schools in the north have refused to coach these sports.”

    Let me be the one to get in the requisite whatabout ying to your yang: I’m sure the same can be said about state schools in Northern Ireland when it comes to the GAA and the Irish language as they have something to do with Irish culture and God forbid we have something like that in Belfast or Armagh.

  • George, my state school offered Gaelic Studies for a mere hour one afternoon a week (kind of an ‘extra’ on top of the curriculum for those doing 3 A-levels), but even that wasn’t exactly popular. GAA though, you’re having a laugh. They made it difficult enough to play football. F**kin egg chasers run the show in most grammar schools.

  • kensei

    “At the moment I would be reluctant to bring an Ulster flag to an Ireland game in Dublin – I think that is something that needs to be worked on.”

    I think you’d find no problems with an Ulster flag. An old Stormont flag, however, is not the same thing.

    Though I agree we should be in a position where you can display that if you like.

  • andy

    Well done Ireland.
    I’m unsure if this will have any lasting, deeper effect in terms of enhancing cross-community feeling , but its good fun nontheless.

    I was in the Archway tavern (a bit like CW above) last night and it was certainly surreal to see the crowd go mental over cricket on St PAddy’s night.

  • Blarney Army Cadet

    Watching this was like watching paint dry — but on a Picasso canvas. You couldn’t figure out what was going on for a while, but it all came together in the end. Ireland’s googlies were there for all to see.

  • merrie

    The odds of an Ireland/Bangladesh final are now 4990 to one

    From The Sydney Morning Herald:
    http://blogs.smh.com.au/sport/archives/mad_monday/

    Ireland’s winning, cricket’s winning

    The cricket World Cup has finally come of age, with its first week showing upsets are now possible after Ireland and Bangladesh won and Australia lifted itself out of a five-match losing streak to overcome Scotland. Before the tournament, the odds of an Ireland-Bangladesh final were a juicy 5000-1. Now they are closer to 4990-1 after both teams recorded stirring victories on Saturday. Ireland rebounded from managing only a tie against Zimbabwe to slay Pakistan in what was a triumph for Gaelic perseverance and the Australian accent. Without any assistance from forfeited games or other such aids which have helped minnows through and boosted the tournament’s shaky claims to credibility in the past, the Irish became the first team to reach the last eight. Not to be outdone, Bangladesh, too, showed themselves to be an emerging cricket power by beating Greg Chappell’s India. The wins have turned the tournament on its head, and if any locals had bothered to turn up and pay half their week’s wages to watch, they would have walked away with a memory to hold for a lifetime.

    by TREVOR MARSHALLSEA
    March 19, 2007

  • lapsedmethodist

    When questioned about his attitude to the Irish cricket team becoming World Champions, well known GAA writer and historian J.J. MacSulk said he’d be writing to the GAA asking them to return his fathers medals which he’d returned to them previously so that he’d be in a position to return them if the occasion ever arose.

  • inuit_goddess

    “Watching this was like watching paint dry—but on a Picasso canvas.”

    Fantastic description of what cricket is like at it’s best Blarney – brings back memories of pre-internet times back in Galway, listening to “Test Match Special” on the static-y 198 LW radio 4 transmission…

    1999 in Dublin was just great – there were Ulster flags everywhere, being flown from the big stores on Grafton Street and from every second pub. Drunken eejits belting out the sash along the quays the night before too, great stuff!

    I think Ireland’s rugby and cricket performances have shown what we can all do when we’re on the same side – and also demonstrated the great potential of sport as a catalyst for reconciliation.

    In particular, as a unionist, the respect shown for my national anthem at Croke Park this season will live long in the memory.

  • The Pict

    “but when was the last time you saw one at an ireland game?”

    When they played England at Croke Park. There is a photo at The Times or Telegraph of a guy in an Irish rugby shirt with one.

  • George

    Is it true that the old GAA ban on “foreign sports” never extended to cricket.

    Heard once that the old cricket strongholds in Ireland were where hurling now predominates.

  • Blarney Army Cadet

    Yes, Innuit, nice to see someone playing with a straight bat. Well done.

  • t.Ruth

    This is not Irelands first cricket triumph-years ago Ireland beat the West Indies at Sion Mills. had them all out for twenty eight(28)runs.
    I got to meet Viv Richards once in Antigua when I was there working. When I threatened to remind him of the result he pleaded for mercy.Some of the Antiguans present refused to believe it could have happened until one of their cricket expert friends reported back next day.
    I do believe that the Sion Mills victory was influenced by the after effects of much merry making in local hostelries the night before.
    What a great result against Pakistan for a sport that has worked hard to modernise and develop.
    T.Ruth.

  • BP1078

    I’m sure the same can be said about state schools in Northern Ireland when it comes to the GAA and the Irish language as they have something to do with Irish culture and God forbid we have something like that in Belfast or Armagh.

    George

    In my state school, during both History and Literature classes, I was exposed, without any lasting ill-effects;),to Irish *culture* (for want of a better word).

    The Irish language is also now taught as an optional extra in a few state grammar schools.

    I don’t know of any taking up GAA sports, rugby and cricket still rules the roost most places without even soccer getting a look in.

  • Donnacha

    “Heard once that the old cricket strongholds in Ireland were where hurling now predominates.”

    You could be right there George. It was very popular in Wexford at one time and there is still an obstinate few who wield the willow in north Wexford of a weekend. However, while hurling might now predominate in Wexford, the quality of said hurling leaves a lot to be desired. Still, a fantastic victory for Ireland and great to see cricket finally making headlines.

  • Bill

    The Irish Cricket Team
    PO Box 2007
    Dublin 1

    (The Northside? How starnge?)

    Letters can be posted to the Irish Cricket team for free before Thursday evening in the RoI.