Ulster for sale and there’s only one buyer?

There seems to be a degree of symmetry in two stories in today’s media regarding the future direction of Northern Ireland. The Sunday Times reports that the Irish government is planning to spend more than €1 billion on motorways, energy links and healthcare in Northern Ireland as part of ongoing efforts to create an all-island economy. Update: Taoiseach Bertie Ahern has refused to confirm the financial package.

Meanwhile in the Sunday Business Post, unionism’s favourite commentator Tom McGurk argues that Ian Paisley has spent the past four decades “destroying Irish Unionism as a political, economic or moral force” and, as a result, Northern Ireland is now for sale at a knockdown price.

“Just as soon as he says ‘‘yes’’ and battens down the devolved hatches, the Celtic Tiger will pounce over the border and snap up all the bargains,” he writes. “I won’t whisper it too loudly, Paisley, posterity is listening, but you know as I do that, at the very moment of your historical triumph, you have finally got your richly deserved comeuppance. Ulster is for sale, after all.”

  • Quaysider

    Protestantism a “state cult”? Unlike Catholicism in the Republic until recently then?

    Eds Quaysider: I’ve removed the comment on McGurk’s private life.

  • Greenflag

    ‘Taoiseach Bertie Ahern is playing down reports that the Government is to make €1bn in aid available for the North.’

    Bloody right too . If they can’t manage with 6 billion a year ‘aid’ what’s an extra billion going to do .

    This attempted ‘bribe’ to get the DUP and SF into a devolved Assembly will be as popular with voters in the Republic as the bubonic plague .

    Somebody must have told Bertie that the Republic’s voters would rather see ‘aid’ being given to first time housebuyers in the Republic than showered out to a bunch of permanently ungrateful spongers and malcontents north of the border .

    The news that the ‘slump coalition’ are devising a package of northern ‘aid’ as part of their electoral strategy to unseat the FF/PD coalition is just another example of how far removed from political reality are the leaders of FG/Lab etc !

  • Quaysider

    Understood moderator, but I feel it is still a fair question to ask where McGurk’s vitriol comes from. It’s not like the RUC was ripping up his floorboards in Dublin 4. Since the events in his private life of which we shall not speak, McGurk’s commenting career has focused increasingly on a hatred of all things northern and protestant even as he sought to advocate Sinn Fein’s role in an agreement that was supposed to bring unity. His position is so inconsistent and emotional that serious personal motivations must be considered a factor.

  • Greenflag

    Quaysider,

    ‘but I feel it is still a fair question to ask where McGurk’s vitriol comes from. ‘

    Paisley .

    That which being but taught has returned to plague the preacher ..

    Ireland needs to turn it’s collective back to Ian Paisley and what he represents . Having a cleric as First Minister in a so called modern European State is a joke and not even a funny joke !

    Just because there has been no Unionist leader with the balls to tackle Paisley’s authoritarian leadership does not mean that we Irish should accept Paisley as First Minister .

    Better to have DR and wait until a new Unionist leader emerges – hopefull one with a better grasp of the modern 21st century world and without a dog collar round his neck !

  • Quaysider

    Well yes, I quite agree – but I don’t see why this opinion necessitates a newspaper column that calls protestants cultists and sneers in delight at the prospect of their culture collapsing, their communities disintegrating and everything they once owned being snapped up as a bargain by southern carpet-baggers. Even if this is to happen, a socially-responsible commentator would surely regard it as a matter of some concern given the inevitable prospect of dislocation and perhaps even violence. McGurk just seems delighted. Frankly, this piece was w work of tribal hatred – which makes its commentary on Ian Paisley seem somewhat invalid…

  • Tom McGurk is from Co Tyrone. He wrote one of the most powerful pices for Hibernia on why the H Block protest developed and rooted it in club fotball (Gaelic) in Tyrone. It was all about a small team, uncut grass grass and where many members othat team ended up. The 6 cos was a terrorist state with its own armed militia to keep those GAA players, Croppies, down.
    McGurk simply calls a spade a spade, whether he is talking about rugby, the arts or the fascist 6 co state.
    Any further bribes given to the north are probably to yet again try to buy off Sinn Fein. They are an endless pit for the hard earned money of others.

  • Quaysider

    Uncut grass from Tyrone, eh?
    But enough about Martin McGuinness.

  • GavBelfast

    Investment is investment.

    I know it’s his joband his mentality, but a lot of this article sounds like needless slabbering.

  • GavBelfast

    In my rush in post 8., I meant McGurk’s piece – there’s nothing new in it at all, who doesn’t know of Paisley’s seemingly endless of run of phyrric victories?

  • Henry94

    I see absolutely no point whatsoever in the kind of invective that McGurk is indulging in. Anyone who fails to see a win win situation where everybody benefits has no real contribution to make to the future.

    Economic co-operation is in all our interests. Roads go in both directions, health care improvements are badly needed and will suit everybody and energy doesn’t have a political allegiance.

    I have formed the view that the people on both sides who shout loudest about victory secretly believe they have lost.

  • lib2016

    Nice to see a real journalist telling the truth as he sees it, and of course he is quite right though maybe a touch negative. Got to make it colourful if he wants to sell papers, I suppose.

    Old line unionism, as in the UUP, had to be defeated and post-unionism was never going to emerge fully formed.

    Whatever the DUP is and it seems a bit unfair to call it Protestantism since most Protestants worldwide would reject any identification with it is the undisputed champion of unionism today.

    Paisleyism (and if it’s not a sect then what is it?) is a stage in the development of a new communal identity for the Northern Prod., Scots Irish, Ulster Scots or whatever you call them people. At least half of them come from an Irish or English background but who cares? Do the rows about the existence of such a thing as a Celtic race change the fact that there is most certainly an Irish nation?

    There does seem to be a move towards accepting a “Northern Ireland” identity by Sinn Fein, to go with their much loved all-Irish identity so there is hope, at last, of something we can agree on.

  • slug

    “I see absolutely no point whatsoever in the kind of invective that McGurk is indulging in.”

    Well said Henry.

  • Quaysider

    Yes, good man yourself Henry. Let’s hope McGurk is joining the long list of ‘republican’ truceleer commentators that Sinn Fein is fast outgrowing.

  • John East Belfast

    Very Lord Haw Haw esque in its style –

    This kind of thing does not unnerve unionists and if anything causes us to chuckle that our enemies engaging in this type of fantasy analysis is all they have left.

    lib2016

    “There does seem to be a move towards accepting a “Northern Ireland” identity by Sinn Fein,”

    I hope you are right as having a shared future and creating goodwill in NI is the real way to have a peaceful transition to whatever our children and grandchildren decide how they ultimately wish to relate to one another.

    The natural follow on from this of course is for 6 county nationalists to get behind the NI Football team !!

  • lies, damned lies

    McGurk is the most deluded of useful idiots. He has always been too blinded by this own sectarianism to see the reality of the Provo sell out.

  • slug

    The positives are that there is going to be a big amount of money to invest in NI, most of which is coming from London but Dublin contributing too.

    The things I would like to see this spent on are things like the University research base so as to develop a high skill base and good jobs to attract people to Belfast to set up businesses. That I think would be the most important. I’d also like to see the railway service improved so its really transformed, maybe some investment for local sports. Not sure we need that much more roads, maybe dualling on the Belfast-Derry route.

  • €1 billion! NI gets enough each year from the British Government. That’s our money, it’s not like we don’t need it.

  • Mick Fealty

    Another sectarian bun fight? This is in danger of becoming predictable and tedious.

    maca,

    One of the cross border issues is access for Donegal residents to Altnagelvin Hospital. That will involve the Republic spending tax euros on services in Northern Ireland, in order to ease infrastructural problems in Donegal.

    Surely this is less about the Republic’s generous largesse, than enlightened self interest? Or at least if it isn’t that what it should be about, surely?

  • Crataegus

    Henry94

    Economic co-operation is in all our interests. Roads go in both directions, health care improvements are badly needed and will suit everybody and energy doesn’t have a political allegiance.

    Right on target.

    The better we do both sides of the border and the more we cooperate to mutual advantage the better for us all. It should have sod all to do with the future of NI.

    I do wish people would stop grasping at such issues to justify a preset political agenda. If there is to be a united Ireland it will not be helped by forcing the issue at every turn, that simply repels.

    Money and investment are global. Many people own property and investment abroad. Have any of you ever sat down and calculated just how much it would cost to buy all property along one major road, have a go it is frightening. So remember all these things should be seen in the round.

  • slug

    Crat I agree.

    I thought the spin in the pieces above was rather tribalist; rather than talking about the great investment opportunities for everyone it is turned on its head and converted into a tribal calculus. How stupid!

  • aquifer

    Settlements could render a lot of tribal bonding narratives redundant.

    Business journalists could be very busy though, covering what people can get up to with 3.75 percent property mortgages and 13% or whatever corporation tax.

    An edgy separatists worst dream could be that the business class get together and find that all their teenage kids went to britain, and now want their country back without Sinn Fein.

    As for cross border packages. Bertie can no longer play the poor mouth without people laughing to his face. Sure didn’t the Brits cough up for all the cross border bits the last time. Bertie now actually needs links to the North to let off some inflationary steam.

  • Armed Atheist

    Protestantism a “state cult”? Unlike Catholicism in the Republic until recently then?

    Er no. Catholicism is an international cult led by the Antichrist in Rome, remember?

    I agree that the “tribal calculus” is in there, with all that vainglorious pouncing Celtic Tiger stuff. But….

    I don’t think it’s unfair to detail Paisley’s role in destroying moderate political opinion of all stripes since the “O’Neill must go” days, the role that destruction had in increasing violence, and finally the brass neck the man has in claiming as his legacy something he fought against tooth and nail for 40 years. I just don’t think Tom McGurk is the man to do it.

    Neither does Tom if you look at one of the conclusions of the article: Will anyone spell out to Paisley what he has done? That’s your job mate; quit foaming at the mouth and do it.

  • Yokel

    Nice try at a wind up George but if you read how much the total Ireland infrastructure plan is over the next 10 years the North’s part is like the loose change…and its fraction of what the British Government will pump in.

    Cross border joint projects make sense in these areas, its not unusual elsewhere in Europe. McGurk is just a bitter child but the North turns those out by the ton.

    Should there be a United Ireland I’m sure the south will be delighted with taking in all its bitter brothers & sisters….what a poisoned chalice.

  • ernie

    lets just take all the money and make a better place ,for all the people of the north .

  • darth rumsfeld

    ooooh I’m so scared- all that free state cash is going to come up North and buy out our beloved Ulster- just the way all that British and U.S. cash flowing into Dublin has ..er resulted in Ireland reapplying to join the UK , which has then enrolled as the 51st state of the Union.
    Economically and politically illiterate piece that even John Coulter would have no trouble demolishing.

    But look how all the republicans on this blog wallow in the comfort blanket he provides! if we can’t breed them out, or bomb them out, we’ll buy them out! You caould always try talking to us instead of at us or down to us/ Oh, and thanks for the cash.

  • Elvis Parker

    This is such a non story. The first party in the Republic to suggest that their citizens give away their hard earned cash to a ‘foreign’ country of which they know little will lose the General Election

  • mnob

    George – if I’m being generous the article has been written with a little spin. I’ll give you the benefit of the doubt as it is clearly the headline of the ST article which is just plain wrong.

    The 1Bn Euro is *not* being spent *in* Northern Ireland as is implied by :

    “the Irish government is planning to spend more than €1 billion on motorways, energy links and healthcare in Northern Ireland ”

    The Northern Ireland bit applies to healthcare only – and in this case a radiotherapy unit in Derry which presumably will be used by people from Donegal too.

  • George

    Mnob,
    I would agree that there seems to be a large degree of spin in both stories regarding investment from the Republic in Northern Ireland, which is one of the reasons why I linked them together.

    I gave no opinion either way on their supposed veracity as, in this instance, I didn’t want to add my own spin where there already was enough to go around.

    If I had to make a comment on it, I would say that it is very strange that the Sunday Times would have this investment story as its page 1 headline.

  • dantheman

    I feel a significant amount of this money will be in using Derry as an administration unit for the NW. This is a great development in my mind, as it will help diminish the border. Hopefully some money will flow into South Down.

    South Down is one of the most beautiful and peaceful parts of Ireland. By and large it is free of the curse of the Orangeman, and as a result is a good place for investment. It would be an asset to the Republic, not a drain.

  • Wilde Rover

    Ah, the Celtic Tiger. Historians of the future will be forgiven for thinking that this Celtic Tiger was just the latest installment in colourful Irish mythology, what with its pouncing across whole counties and engulfing large swathes of property with one bite.

    The reality is that the so-called Celtic Tiger came about because enough people managed to mentally disentangle themselves from the rule of Rome and a stalemate conflict to become the enterprising progressive pluralistic society it is today.

    It is laughable that this society has been personified as some sort of psychotic feline. It all smells like naked sectarian nationalism masquerading as republicanism.

    And yet while it is abundantly clear that the vast majority of the people of the Republic of Ireland are now culturally Protestant in both work ethic, spirit of enterprise and, it would seem most importantly, religious independence, some commentators still seek comfort in old certainties, like the Free State.

    Come now Darth, those days are long gone. After all, isn’t the twenty-first century Republic of Ireland the type of neighbour Unionism has been saying it wanted for eighty years?

  • darth rumsfeld

    ..er, am I missing something here Wilde Rover? Did I not make it clear that the idea of McGurk’s fantasies that one morning perfidious Hibernia would announce it had bought up all the title to our wee Ulster and was giving 28 days’ notice to quit to us Planters was complete manure? We don’t much care how the Republic does economically except as follows. If it’s doing better or worse than us it’s a competitor. If it’s doing well, and we benefit as a spin off, congratulations! If it’s a basket case and it starts exporting its superfluous population to the UK to our detriment-again- then we’re not pleased. If it wants to throw us some cash, hurrah! So on balance we’re favourably disposed to the Celtic Tiger- like we are to the USA and its dollars that come over here. It still isn’t going to change our politics-gedditt??

  • dantheman

    Mr rumsfeld,

    No-one is asking you to change your politics. Just informing you that the house that you have been renting is being sold over your heads. And you have never been very good at paying you bills now have you?

    Try to some respect for your new landlord for Christs sake man!! He’ll be calling in soon so we’d appreciate it if you remove all those red white and blue periphenalia that you have covered you house with.
    That sort of stuff belongs to the house next door, and he would appreciate it if you could give it back – as your behaviour with the aforementioned articles has been quite an embarassment to him for quite some time.

  • Quaysider

    Appalling sectarian triumphalism.

  • darth rumsfeld

    dantheverysillyman
    we’ve been squatting since 1603, and noone’s put us out yet.

  • dantheman

    “dantheverysillyman
    we’ve been squatting since 1603, and noone’s put us out yet.”

    Seroiusly Darth, all joking and sectarianism aside – a few serious questions for you.

    As you are not Irish – what are you doing in Ireland??
    Did nobody like yous in Scotland??
    And when are you going home?

    All the best for now, Looking forward to hearing from you,

    Dan the “not silly at all at all” man

  • Quaysider

    Putting Dantheman’s e-mail name into Google reveals that he has signed the IRSP’s “Hands off Venezuela” petition.
    So here is a question for him:

    Venezuela was colonised by Spain in 1522. Should all the people of European descent in Venezuela now return to Spain, or does this principle only apply to colonisations after 1603?

  • dantheman

    There’s no bigger brit than a D4 West Brit.

    1. I was only taking the piss out of an obvious bigot.
    2. Venezuela is an independent nation. Ireland is not yet.
    3. Nobody answered my questions. What are you doing in Ireland if you are not Irish??

  • Quaysider

    So are you taking the píss, or are you actually seriously asking the question: “Why don’t you go back to your own country?”

    Not bígótéd at all yourself then, thank god.

  • dantheman

    Quaysider,
    Thanks for the Google search.

    It is a serious question, which is yet to be addressed. I personally think that they should stay here, but their behaviour needs to be watched and controlled a little more rigorously.

    PS None of my questions have been answered. I am only looking for clarification.

  • Quaysider

    If you want ‘them’ to ‘stay’ but their status to change, then an onus falls on you to create a new sense of Irishness that accommodates their sense of Britishness. Or do you envisage moves to unity as a one-way process in which you get want you want and anyone who doesn’t like it leaves the country?

  • Wilde Rover

    Yes Darth, I believe you have missed something. I never asked you to change your politics. Rest assured, I was not trying to love bomb you, and I would use ‘neighbour’ in reference to France, Germany, the Netherlands or any member state of our great Union.

  • darth rumsfeld

    “As you are not Irish – what are you doing in Ireland??
    Did nobody like yous in Scotland??
    And when are you going home?”

    well danthe even sillier than I suspected man

    having squatted here for 400 years we have firmly established squatters’ title, which is accepted in Irish and British law, and means we own the place, so this is our home. Sorry to burst your racist bubble

  • George

    “having squatted here for 400 years we have firmly established squatters’ title, which is accepted in Irish and British law, and means we own the place, so this is our home.”

    Actually Darth,
    that’s not exactly true. “Adverse possession” only comes into effect if you enter the land illegally and with the full knowledge of the owner, who then subsequently fails to take action.

    But, as I understand, the settlers went on to the land legally so therefore the rule of adverse possession can’t apply in this case regardless of how many years they were on the land.

  • lib2016

    I thought it had been decided (by themselves) that 1/ they were only tourists

    and 2/ the “United Irishmen” were only an illusion brought on by the Devil’s buttermilk.

  • Greenflag

    ‘You could always try talking to us instead of at us or down to us’

    Waste of time Darth. Might as well try to talk your namesake out of his conviction that invading Iraq was the best way to introduce the Iraqis to the benefits of democracy .

    Some people are destined to learn the hard way or never at all .

    Roll on repartition and be done with the shite !

  • dantheman

    Roll on repartition and be done with the shite !”

    Sounds better and better by the day. If they build the motorway from Dublin to Derry, the transport system will effectively already be repartitioned.

  • Billy

    Darth

    What a lot of nonsense you do talk.

    No-one is putting anyone out. However, it is a FACT that many businessmen and property developers from the RoI own substantial amounts of prime land in NI.

    The truth is that more and more of the private sector investment in NI originates from the RoI. Money talks and only the most bigotted of businessmen would be stupid enough to turn down good investment opportunities with RoI businesses.

    Cross border links (both public and private) can only grow in strength over the next few years. This (among other things) will lead to increasing input from the RoI into the running of NI.

    As for your remarks about NI and the RoI being “competitors”. You must be joking!!. NI IS AND ALWAYS HAS BEEN DEPENDENT ON THE UK GOVT BAILING IT OUT TO THE TUNE OF BILLIONS EACH YEAR.

    Over 70% of NI income comes from the public sector. In case you hadn’t noticed the UK govt is trying to cut the bill in NI and gradually disengage – as successive UK govts have been doing for 30 years.

    NI can’t compete on any terms – if the UK govt withdrew the subsidies, it would be bankrupt.

    I am not silly enough to believe that one day everything will just change and there will be a United Ireland.

    However, over the next generation, everything is clearly moving inexorably in that direction – the demographics, the finanacial situation and, most importantly, the clear strategy of the UK govt (of either party) to keep disengaging from NI.

  • John East Belfast

    Billy

    “However, it is a FACT that many businessmen and property developers from the RoI own substantial amounts of prime land in NI.”

    This FACT you are talking about – how many businessmen and what square footage or acreage are we talking about ?

    “The truth is that more and more of the private sector investment in NI originates from the RoI.”

    This truth you are talking about can you quote Euros and £ ?

    “Cross border links (both public and private) can only grow in strength over the next few years. This (among other things) will lead to increasing input from the RoI into the running of NI.”

    How exactly will that happen in practice ?

    All those multi billion $ investments by US companies in the ROI in last 20 years – is the US now running the Free State ?

    “NI IS AND ALWAYS HAS BEEN DEPENDENT ON THE UK GOVT BAILING IT OUT TO THE TUNE OF BILLIONS EACH YEAR.”

    At the turn of the Century Belfast was one of the three biggest contributors to the UK Exchequer – the City Hall was lavishly built as a monument to this.
    This trend continued for many more years.
    The fact that it once had the largest ship yard in the world, built ships like the Titanic, was at the forefront of Linen manufacture and textile machinery manufacture, rope making and aircraft design
    – and all this was going on while the forefathers of the celtic tiger were kicking shuck around the fields.

    “Over 70% of NI income comes from the public sector. In case you hadn’t noticed the UK govt is trying to cut the bill in NI and gradually disengage – as successive UK govts have been doing for 30 years.”

    Our disengagement from old industry coincided with a 30 year viscious terrorist onslaught designed to destabilise the economy – indeed as someone actively involved in NI plc I am amazed at the shape it is in considering.

    Several years of peace just might see a repeat of the NI v ROI football rankings ? – so I wouldnt crow to loudly

    As for the British disengaging I wonder what that MI5 HQ is all about ?
    Anyhow your wrong – NI remains an integral part of the UK for those who wish to engage.

    If Nationalists continue to remain on the outside I can understand how you feel unwanted

    “NI can’t compete on any terms – if the UK govt withdrew the subsidies, it would be bankrupt.”

    The Economist magazine did a similar infamous feature about the ROI 20 years ago.

    Once again for those of us on the inside given a fair wind there is no end to what we could achieve here

    “However, over the next generation, everything is clearly moving inexorably in that direction – the demographics, the finanacial situation and, most importantly, the clear strategy of the UK govt (of either party) to keep disengaging from NI.”

    You need a reality check

  • dantheman

    Billy,

    I agree with everything you say 100%.

    I suspect DR is one of a certain type of unionists who believes that God has given them the right to govern unquestioned what they refer to as Ulster. It is taking them too long to realise these dyas are long gone and rightly so, and when they do their influence may well be greatly diminished.

    There are no prizes in this world for standing still. Nationalism has moved with the times and taken great risks, Unionism hasn’t. It will ultimately pay the political price for its intransigence.

  • none of your business

    Will unionists still call the 3 super councils they control “Ulster” ? Once the Doc is tamed (then carks)..the game is over..The “Rome rule” and “Pigs in the Kitchen” arguments don’t fly no more..you are being sold down the river..get over it or do something constructive..

  • Billy

    JEB

    I must admit that your reply isn’t up to your usual standard.

    Your “comparison” between the RoI and NI is not logical. In simplistic terms, the RoI moved from outdated policies, too much Trade Union influence and a draconian tax policy to an economic base providing the foundation for the “Celtic Tiger”.

    The KEY factor here is that the RoI govt had control over all these things. Even if an NI assembly is established, it will have control over NONE of these things.

    “Given a fair wind, there is no limit to what we can achieve”. If that’s so – why are so many students (particularly middle and upper class Unionists) going to UK universities and not coming back?

    MI5 – is that really the best example of the UK Govt engagement that you can come up with? How many jobs is that bringing to NI? and how exactly will it add to the future prosperity of NI?

    I would have thought that the troop withdrawals, the disbandment of the RIR etc would possibly be a better indication of the UK govts long term intentions.

    I have no doubt that the RoI economy (like anywhere else) will have it’s ups and downs. However, I think it’ll be a long long time before it could “compete” with an economy that has been dependent on subsidies for 30 years.

    The RoI influence in NI affairs was formalised in the Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985 and has grown ever since. Despite the DUP propaganda -the St Andrews Agreement has not reduced the number of cross border bodies or their remit.

    It is still a fact that the Catholic/Nationalist percentage of the NI population is growing faster that the Unionist (albeit at a slower rate than previously).

    It is also my opinion (shared by many Unionists) that NI is a complete non issue to the UK electorate – most of them don’t care if the “Union” goes at some point.

    I hope there is peace in NI and, as I stated, I think that the moves towards a United Ireland will be a gradual process over the next generation.

    However, the vast majority of the (growing) Catholic/Nationalist population will still aspire to a United Ireland achieved through peaceful democratic means.

    The UK govt will be (at best) ambivalent and the RoI govt will encourage it. Therefore, in my opinion, things can move only in 1 direction. I mean – I can’t see anything happening that strengthens the Union in the long term.

    You mentioned a reality check. I think that you may be one of those UUP members who believes this “as British as Finchley” or “Simply British” crap.

    I think the reality is that VERY few of the UK electorate outside NI Unionism considers NI to be a real part of the UK. Most of them wouldn’t care if NI went from the Union – a reasonable percentage would be happy to see it go.

    The increasing input from the RoI at both Govt and private sector level is welcomed by the UK as it “lightens the load” for them.

    That’s reality.

  • Crataegus

    Billy

    I own property in the south and what does that prove? Simply I saw opportunities to make a profit. Does it have any political significance whatsoever NO. Same applies to investors in the North.

    I wonder if the British are trying to buy back Aquitaine?

    NOYB

    We are all being parked well off shore.

  • darth rumsfeld

    “that’s not exactly true. “Adverse possession” only comes into effect if you enter the land illegally and with the full knowledge of the owner, who then subsequently fails to take action.

    But, as I understand, the settlers went on to the land legally so therefore the rule of adverse possession can’t apply in this case regardless of how many years they were on the land.”

    Posted by George on Oct 23, 2006 @ 05:19 PM

    Well thanks George, I accept your gracious endorsement of the legality of british rule, but some of the less revisionised republicans are still having problems with that one, so presumably they’ll regard 1641, to take one example, as “doing something about it”,as doubtless the campaign of the last 35 years also counts for some of that mindset. You and i are able to rise above that nonsense though.

    dan the “hiding behind stereotypes because you can’t answer the arguments” man .
    Au contraire, I’m just a happy capitalist, who is never more content than when he’s taking someone’s money. I’ve taken lots of Protestant money, and it hasn’t turned me into a fundamentalist, I’ve probably taken more Roman catholic money-if I could be bothered to work out is origin, but I’m not a Jesuit- and yes, I’m proud to have taken Irish money, but you’ll never get me turned on to a united Ireland.

    It’s saddos like you who waste their lives with a slide rule, a calculator, and every local paper to count up the births and deaths, waiting and longing for the day when you’ll be able to say “It’s 50%+1 Day!-let’s slap it into the Prods, let’s paint all the red pillar boxes green”.

    I’d almost want to see it happen- the look on your face as the overwhelming apathy of your claimed closet nationalists in the RC community to the idea of constitutional change would be a picture. Because the real fear for you is that for every garden centre Prod there is today, there’s a garden centre taig tomorrow, who’s as turned of by your zealotry as North Down is by Willie Mccrea

    It’s like all the guff on this thread about the Prod brain drain. Why shouldn’t a UK citizen go to university in GB, and live there? Do we put an electric fence around Hull too to prevent northern brain drain? Oh, and in case you hadn’t noticed , there’s lots of British citizens from NI going to GB who happen to be RCs- even your old mucker Chris Gaskin. Whaddaya say in 5 years time he’ll have put some manners on the ould South Armagh accent, adopted a strangulated English drawl, a taste for best bitter, cricket supporting a foreign team in a saxon game like-oh, say West Ham, find a nice Home Counties girl, settle down and make a pile of cash-it’s called getting a sense of perspective, and it’s shared by Eamon Holmes, Terry Wogan, Roy Keane, and millions of other irish people who are quite content to enjoy the multiple benefits of the UK . You should try it.

  • dantheman

    OOOOOOOOOHHH!!!!

    http://www.chameleon-web.co.uk/photography/handbag.jpg

    Well DR, you havent put forward any arguments and you didnt answer my questions either.

    “It’s saddos like you who waste their lives with a slide rule, a calculator, and every local paper to count up the births and deaths, waiting and longing for the day when you’ll be able to say “It’s 50%+1 Day!-let’s slap it into the Prods, let’s paint all the red pillar boxes green”.”

    Funnily enough I work for a living in belfast, and even were I on the bru I nor any other (sane) person on the island would do such a thing.

    “Eamon Holmes, Terry Wogan, Roy Keane, and millions of other irish people who are quite content to enjoy the multiple benefits of the UK . You should try it.”

    Well technically I have been trying it all my life and I think the benefits of the reunification of my country are infinitely better.

    “but you’ll never get me turned on to a united Ireland.”

    That’s no problem, we’ll not lose any sleep over that. As long as you behave yourself when it happens.

  • Quaysider

    Brain drain?
    When Chris Gaskin left Northern Ireland average IQ went up. It was average weight that went down.

  • dantheman

    “Brain drain?
    When Chris Gaskin left Northern Ireland average IQ went up. It was average weight that went down.”

    http://www.chameleon-web.co.uk/photography/handbag.jpg

  • Iano

    Would this billion count towards the 0.7% Liz O’Donnell and a few others want spent helping the third world?

  • Pounder

    Danthemsn, last time I checked my Passport it said United Kindom of Great Britain AND NORTHERN IRELAND. Are you also going to argue that a scotsman or welshman can’t be british either?