What price diversity in sport?

Jarlath Burns has an interesting piece in today’s Daily Ireland, in which he considers whether both traditions most precious institutions should preserve their cultural and historical integrity or embrace change as part of an attempt to include ‘old enemies’?

  • iluvni

    Interesting piece perhaps, but the author bottled it. He raised the questions which need answered about the GAA failing to ‘reach out’ to Unionists, but then steered away from them with an entirely bogus analogy about Protestants ‘hijacking’ Remembrance.

    The fact is that the GAA should be made accountable as they’ve benefitted to the tune of millions of pounds in grants..money which, due to the sectarian nature of GAA, is benefitting one section of the community only.

  • Billy Pilgrim

    Iluvni

    Hmmmm. I think Jarlath Burns has been a lot more fair-minded than you have.

    I don’t think there is any imperative on the GAA to “reach out” to anyone. It is a private organisation made up of its national and international membership. It is incredibly vibrant and popular and needs no advice from those who, let’s be honest here, are committed to despising it anyway.

    Despite all this though, in the last four years alone the GAA has dropped its ban on the security forces and opened up Croke Park. This season, for the first time a PSNI team is competing in the Sigerson Cup.

    These are three massive initiatives, examples of the GAA acting progressively and breaking down barriers. Has unionism shown a willingness to accept any of these gestures in good faith?

    Hard question, and one with a somewhat contradictory answer, in my opinion. Over the last few years I have seen more and more Protestants at big games and getting involved in events. I also know of various informal links developing between GAA clubs and their rugby and soccer counterparts in Armagh and Dungannon. I imagine things are thawing out elsewhere too. I have also reached a stage now where I can actually chat about matters GAA with my Protestant friends. They actually know who Kieran McGeeney is now, and most of them also have opinions on whether he has another season left in him or not. This would have been unthinkable even five years ago.

    On the other hand though is the depressing reality that unionist politicians remain wedded the the rhetoric of the past, and prefer to stick to the comfort zone of excoriating the GAA as the “IRA at play”.

    I remember a little vignette recently that said it all for me. Maurice Morrow was on RTE, on Questions and Answers, the week after Tyrone, his county, had won the All Ireland, and what a heart-rendingly pathetic sight he was. He came out with a predictable spiel about cold house this, sectarian that etc, and declared he had no interest in the spectacular events at Croke Park. He went further and insisted that no unionists in Co Tyrone had any interest.

    I wish I’d been John Bowman. I would have pointed out that Mr Morrow’s DUP running mate at the last Dungannon council elections had won a Tyrone county medal with Dungannon Clarkes in the 1980s. Denvir Thompson. A ferocious full back and an all-round fantastic fella, so I’m told.

    I thought it was a great example of how, regardless of events on the ground, there will always be those within political unionism who remain addicted to polemical rhetoric.

    “The fact is that the GAA should be made accountable as they’ve benefitted to the tune of millions of pounds in grants..money which, due to the sectarian nature of GAA, is benefitting one section of the community only.”

    A few questions arise.

    1: How do you make the GAA “accountable”? It’s a private organisation.

    2: How is the organisation sectarian? I accept that it is perceived as such, but that’s not the same thing. Could you prove in a court of law that the GAA is “sectarian”? Could you prove it is more “sectarian” than any other organisation in Northern Ireland that receives public money?

    3: Why do you think the government would not allot money to an organisation that benefits “one section of the community only”? I think you’ll find almost all government money goes to such schemes – in fact, cross-community groups usually have the most trouble getting funding.

    4: “The GAA have benefitted to the tune of millions of pounds…”
    Yes but can you elaborate on the nature of these grants? Where has the money gone? If the money has gone into clubhouses and sporting facilities benefitting a community, and thereby saving millions that might otherwise be spent on publicly-owned leisure centres, isn’t this money well spent?

    5: Would you agree that the GAA provides a valuable service to communities throughout the north? If so, doesn’t this mean it provides a valuable service to the north as a whole? And if so, why knock it?

  • Conor

    very nice post Billy.

  • Mick Fealty

    Is Burns right to argue that the dichotomy (ie some unionists ‘love the game, but hate the association’) is only Unionisms. If it is true, does it not also apply to the GAA?

  • Billy Pilgrim

    Mick

    “Is Burns right to argue that the dichotomy (ie some unionists ‘love the game, but hate the association’) is only Unionisms. If it is true, does it not also apply to the GAA?”

    Not sure I follow?

  • Mick Fealty

    Too late for me. I need an early night. I’m not sure that’s what he was arguing. I’m off to bed.

  • P Ring

    Am I in a different time zone? It’s only 8.17pm where I am. Did you forget to put the clocks back Mick?

  • I’d like to see the GAA doing more, but i’m only a Southern partitionist who’s never lived in the North etc etc.

    Mick, ‘Love the game but hate the associaiton’. I think anyone who loves the game could ignore many of the problems with the association.
    And who says you have to join the association anyway? If someone loves the games they can play them and need never join the association.

  • Billy Pilgrim

    Maca

    “I’d like to see the GAA doing more, but i’m only a Southern partitionist who’s never lived in the North etc etc.”

    Och Maca, you know we all love you really! Chin up a chara.

  • Lafcadio

    Billy – the GAA cannot be fairly described as a private organisation; there are a couple of private limited companies set up to simplify its financial dealings, but given the extent of public subvention over the years, this doesn’t make it a private enterprise.

    You are however correct to say that it doesn’t have to change; although the British and Irish governements, as major stakeholders, financial and otherwise, in the GAA are fully entitled to press for change as they see fit. But ultimately as a sporting and community body, it should reflect the views of its members. There’s no imperative for it to change, but given that you accept that it’s perception as a sectarian organisation (in the north at least), the question is rather does it want to change, or are its members content to continue in its perceived sectarian state?

  • Lafcadio
    “the question is rather does it want to change, or are its members content to continue in its perceived sectarian state?”

    Well if change will make absolutely no difference (according to some unionists here) does the question become why bother? What reason is there to change? And how do you change a community based organisation in NI which is tasked with promoting one culture? How to you promote one culture to members of another culture when the majourity of them probably want nothing to do with that culture?

  • Realist

    “Yes but can you elaborate on the nature of these grants? Where has the money gone? If the money has gone into clubhouses and sporting facilities benefitting a community, and thereby saving millions that might otherwise be spent on publicly-owned leisure centres, isn’t this money well spent?”

    The GAA has received large amounts of money from Lottery Funding.

    Lottery funding is subject to compliance with Equal Opportunities legislation. Clause 12, “Eligibility Criteria”, of the relevant legislation states:

    “Applicannts will have to show that their rules and actions do not discriminate on the grounds of ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religious belief, POLITICAL OPINION, marital status, age”.

    I have no objection whatsoever to the GAA being what they are, or to their sports which are enjoyed by so many people.

    I object strongly to public lottery money being allocated to an organisation that patently discriminates on the grounds of political opinion.

    If we are serious about equality in this land,I would expect unionist politicans to challenge this flagrant breach of equality legislation.

  • Lafcadio

    maca – “not bothering because it will make no difference anyway” doesn’t sounds to me like an especially sound reason for opposing changes in the GAA. Put it this way, do you think that ceasing to name clubs and competitions after, let’s say, “controversial” figures is more or less likely to make the association and the sports palatable to the broader unionist community? The crux, I think, is do you actually want it to be more palatable to the “others” or are you content with it being “by us for us”?

    I personally believe that the GAA should stick to doing it’s job, which is managing and promoting gaelic games, full stop. That is what its contribution to Irish culture should be.

  • Slugger O’Toole Admin

    P Ring,

    We had a problem with the time that was showing up on the site. Now fixed. Reason for the early night? Small child not sleeping.

  • George

    Realist,
    “Applicannts will have to show that their rules and actions do not discriminate on the grounds of ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, religious belief, POLITICAL OPINION, marital status, age”.”

    The GAA doesn’t ban unionists from joining because of their political opinion, unionists refuse to join because of the GAA’s cultural opinion.

    There is nothing in the GAA’s rules that discriminate political opinion. They may have a certain view but to have a view is not the same as to discriminate.

    For example, members do not have to swear an oath disowning their political opinion.

    That’s like saying a horse-riding school that gets a grant discriminates against those allergic to horses.

  • “doesn’t sounds to me like an especially sound reason for opposing changes in the GAA.”

    Well firstly, I said noting about opposing changes. My question (and these are only questions not my opinions) was should they bother to even try to make changes if it makes no difference?

    “do you think that ceasing to name clubs and competitions after, let’s say, “controversial” figures is more or less likely to make the association and the sports palatable to the broader unionist community?”

    Surely it’s unionists which would need to answer that? I think it would make no difference to some, but should to others.

    “The crux, I think, is do you actually want it to be more palatable to the “others” or are you content with it being “by us for us”?”

    I actually think the “crux” is, is there anything the GAA can do to make it more palatable to unionists?

    “I personally believe that the GAA should stick to doing it’s job, which is managing and promoting gaelic games, full stop.”

    Gaelic games … and music, song, dance, language etc Don’t forget those.

  • Lafcadio

    maca – in answer to your first question, well how do you know that it will make absolutely no difference, without change actually happening? (and if you answer that satisfactorily, as a follow-on, can you email me some of next week’s football results??)

    I personally believe that even if the GAA got rid of its more egregious perceived sectarian trappings, that as you say, for some unionists it would make no difference (certainly in the short-term). However changes of this nature will inevitably be slow-moving, and generational. And in any event, if unionists were still to rail at it (as some would undoubtedly do), it would be their own sectarianism tht was exposed. And even if only a few people came on board, would it not be worth it? Would it not be better than none?

    “Surely it’s unionists which would need to answer that?” no sorry, it’s you and your fellow-members who need to answer that, and it’s not hard to answer! My original question was rhetorical – unless you seriously believe that naming clubs after “controversial” figures (in unionist eyes) makes it MORE likely that the GAA will be more palatable to the broader unionist community??? But the GAA needs to take responsibility for its own stances and actions.

    Your last question astounds me!!! See above for example of change that the GAA could make.

    To go back to my “crux” of the issue – do GAA members in NI want their organisation to have more cross-community appeal? Do they want to have protestant neighbours sitting in their clubhouses, drinking in their bars, standing on their terraces? Or do they prefer something that is “their’s”? That is something I can’t answer (although I suspect that maca will tell me that this is in fact a question for unionists :-))

  • George

    Lafcadio,
    “Do they want to have protestant neighbours sitting in their clubhouses, drinking in their bars, standing on their terraces? ”

    The problem is with unionism not with Protestantism. An Irish Republican Protestant could do that in the morning.

    The question is should the GAA become less Irish Republican (in the Michael McDowell sense of the word) so unionists would feel happier joining?

    What’s in it for them? Two flags, two anthems and a split?

  • Realist

    “There is nothing in the GAA’s rules that discriminate political opinion. They may have a certain view but to have a view is not the same as to discriminate.”

    George,

    That’s the crux of the issue.

    We have differeing views on that.

  • George

    Take it to court realist and plead the case. I think you’ll lose. If it wasn’t the case, I’m sure some bright spark would have been there.

    Imagine the Northern Ireland football was a private organisation like the GAA and not the national team.

    Does it discriminate against nationalists? No it doesn’t. It is simply that if you play football for them it’s GSTQ and union flags.

    There is no rule stopping an Irish Republican from playing for Northern Ireland or joining the IFA and there is no rule preventing a unionist playing GAA or joining the organisation.

    Ergo, no discrimination.

  • Lafcadio
    “how do you know that it will make absolutely no difference”

    I’m only saying what a number of unionists have said here. I can probably did out some quotes frm the archive if I have time.

    “And even if only a few people came on board, would it not be worth it? Would it not be better than none?”

    Certainly.

    “Your last question astounds me!!! See above for example of change that the GAA could make.”

    I know umpteen changes the GAA could make, which I have discussed with others here before. But my question is still essentially will these changes make any difference to unionists?

    “do GAA members in NI …”
    “I suspect that maca will tell me that this is in fact a question for unionists”

    Actually it’s a question for GAA members in NI so I can’t asnwer that 🙂

    Lafcadio, my questions are just that … questions. Don’t take them as arguments.

  • Lafcadio

    George – ok:

    do GAA members in NI want their organisation to have more cross-community appeal? Do they want to have unionist neighbours sitting in their clubhouses, drinking in their bars, standing on their terraces? Or do they prefer something that is “their’s”?

    Your apparent assertion that the GAA is “Irish Republican” may go some way to answering that.

    In any case, like I said before, the GAA shouldn’t change if it’s members don’t want to – but at least let’s be honest about it, and not have hands thrown up in shock when someone points out the perception that will exist of it.

  • Conor

    Look, stop all this crap.
    Simple as this, there doesnt need to be any more change. The GAA have already given enough by changing Rules 21 and 42. These Rules being changed were two steps too far anyway. Letting members of the security forces play in Croke Park? That was an absolute disgrace. Why do i say that? Well lets consider the fact that on Sunday 21 November 1920, British troops stormed Croke Park and massacred 2 players and 12 spectators. Sounds familiar doesnt it? It was an organisation set up to promote Irish culture{a culture which was diminishing before the citizens of this lands eyes due to the British}through games and music and thats the way it should stay. Why do unionists want it to change? Do unionists want to play Gaelic? Have they suddenly developed a taste for traditional Irish music? I dont think so some how, sure arent they British? If we want a real example of a sectarian organisation stop and look at the Orange Order.

  • Realist

    “There is no rule preventing a unionist playing GAA or joining the organisation.”

    George,

    Being a man of little means, I cannot test it in court.

    I too am surprised that it has not been tested by unionism, but perhaps there’s greater brains than mine looking at that very option as we speak.

    By joining the GAA, I would be “bound” to “undertake to further the aims and objects” of the Association.

    The issue is whether some of the “aims and objects” discriminate against those of a unionist political outlook.

    The “Basic Aim” might be an interesting one to start with, coupled with some of the myopic political rhetoric contained in the Official Guide.

    Would be a facinating case.

  • Realist

    “Do unionists want to play Gaelic?”

    Well Conor, if you read Jarlath’s comments carefully, some of those “Brits” in the loyalist housing estates of Portadown might.

    You do make a good case for the plantiffs, I have to say.

    Not a Brit about the place eh…even if they are Irish?

  • George

    Realist,
    indeed, but I am also too poor to follow it up but it could cause movement on the Official Guide, which I have never seen.

    You might find this interesting.

    GAA Mission Statement from its 2002 G.A.A. Strategic Review – Enhancing Community Identity
    review:

    “The primary role of the Gaelic Athletic Association is the development and promotion of Gaelic games as a principal component of Irish identity and culture….

    The G.A.A. is a non-party political, anti-sectarian and anti-racist organisation….

    The difficulty of summarising the aspirations of an organisation as steeped in history and as complex in its activities and values as the G.A.A., is acknowledged….

    The Association should be seen, first and foremost, as a sporting body, one of whose main strengths is its presence in almost every community in Ireland…

    The G.A.A. should be seen as a uniquely Irish organisation that is welcoming to all those who wish to join and who show respect for its ethos and values. In the opinion of the Committee, there is very little, if any, need for, or benefit from, exclusionary rules in an inclusive
    organisation, that is confident of its role, status, potential and prospects.

    http://www.gaa.ie/files/official_reports/strategic_review_2002_part2a1.pdf

    Lafcadio,
    I said Irish Republican in the Michael McDowell sense of the phrase, not the SF sense.

    You show me a unionist who is dedicated to and/or respects the promotion of Gaelic games and pastimes, and the Irish language and I’ll show you someone who should be bought a pint at any bar in any GAA club.

    How this unionist would then (after a few scoops naturally) square the circle of also wanting to live in a separate state because his/her culture is different/would be under threat from an Irish stae would be a discussion I’d love to be sitting in on.

  • bluedemon

    Conor, thank you for your honesty. You sound remarkably like an Orange Order bigot.

  • Lafcadio

    george – this is the problem, there is no inherent linkage between the sports that the GAA sees as its primary role to promote, and Irish Republicanism, of the Michael McDowell or Sinn Fein varieties; at the minute I rather suspect it would be difficult to find a unionist (of big or small u variety) who respects the GAA and its goals, for the very reason that it has aligned itself so definitively to one side of the political divide. But I can think of no reason, apart from personal choice or residual prejudice, for some unionists not to develop an interest in a GAA shorn of its sectarian trappings.

    But in the meantime if you have anything to do with it, to paraphrase glibly, not a unionist about the place?

    I’m impressed by your candour however – are you a member? Most members I’ve spoken to in the past have been at pains to give the message that the GAA is not institutionally nationalist / republican (as the GAA themselves attempt to do in the anodyne language of the “mission statement” that you quote above), but you’re fairly unabashedly saying that it’s Irish Republican (Michael McDowell variety – speaking of him, I wonder whether he’s well thought of among the GAA fraternity in NI?), which is of course quite true.

  • Conor

    hows that bluedemon?

  • Realist

    George,

    “The primary role of the Gaelic Athletic Association is the development and promotion of Gaelic games as a principal component of Irish identity and culture….”

    Sounds like a good “basic aim ” to me! Does Irish identity and culture include all Irish identies and cultures, or just the one?

    “The G.A.A. is a non-party political, anti-sectarian and anti-racist organisation….”

    Wny not just non political?

    “The Association should be seen, first and foremost, as a sporting body, one of whose main strengths is its presence in almost every community in Ireland…”

    Including the large unionist community, representing 20% of the population of Ireland?

    “The G.A.A. should be seen as a uniquely Irish organisation that is welcoming to all those who wish to join and who show respect for its ethos and values.”

    That depends on what the ethos and values of the association are…if they are wholly non political, brilliant!

    “In the opinion of the Committee, there is very little, if any, need for, or benefit from, exclusionary rules in an inclusive
    organisation, that is confident of its role, status, potential and prospects.”

    Absolutely right on the money.

    Here’s a thought.

    The GAA is the most influencial sporting association on the island…hearts and minds etc.

    The IRFU is a 4 Provinces/32 County based organisation…it espouses no political aspirations, it has no divisive political rhetoric in it’s rules and ethos.

    Which organisation is doing more to truly “unite” Ireland?

  • Moyle Rover

    Re Realist point about unionists taking the GAA to court and thinking about it at present: The GAA has been around since 1884, how long do you need to think about taking a case???
    Perhaps there is no case to answer in law hence the great unionist baby barristers never took it on

  • Realist

    Moyle Rover,

    You seem to forget that the relative legislation was only passed in 1998…post GFA.

  • George

    Lafcadio,
    Good grief no. There was no Gaelic where I grew up in Dun Laoghaire. Even the Catholic children would have to race to pick up the ball when the Christian Brother came into view.

    For me, it was rugby and FAI football (brought up to hate Shamrock Rovers naturally, this could be a great week – Come on Dublin City), that was all.

    I didn’t see a hurley stick until I first left the city limits.

    No I’m not a member and never have been but I have taken to watching the sport on a regular basis and going to championship games involving Dublin. Great stuff.

    I live in Cork now, where it is bread and butter to most people even the children of my Lutheran workmate.

    GAA people like Sean Og O’Hailpin and the leadership they show to the community really impress me, especially how he was there for the family of the child Robert Holahan was murdered.

    The coaches etc. are a credit and they held rural and expat communities together in the darkest days.

    To insult the GAA here is virtually to insult Cork itself. I’m sure it’s the same in other counties.

    I don’t have a problem with a private organisation having an Irish ethos just like I don’t have a problem with one having a British ethos.

    The GAA demands the flag of the Irish Republic be flown over its grounds and is rightly entitled to demand this. If the choice is lose unionists or lose your ethos, the GAA will choose losing the unionists.

    Who am I to disagree? Leave your Britishness at the door and pick it up on the way out is my view. Surely it can survive been left on its own for an evening?

    If a unionist finds something like the Irish national flag too great an insult, then there is nothing anyone can do.

  • bluedemon

    Why don’t unionists have to leave their Britishness at the door if they go to the Gaeltacht or do Irish dancing. Both are examples of an Ireland envisaged by a man that many GAA clubs are wrongly called after that includes protestants Roman Catholics and dissenters. The GAA uses a narrow bigoted definition of Irishness.

  • Realist

    “The GAA uses a narrow bigoted definition of Irishness.”

    Nail on the head bluedemon.

  • George

    Bluedemon,

    I’ll try clarify what I meant by leaving Britishness at the door.

    GAA strategic review I quoted earlier:

    “The G.A.A. should be seen as a uniquely Irish organisation that is welcoming to all those who wish to join and who show respect for its ethos and values.”

    When I said leave Britishness at the door, I meant unionists accepting that the GAA isn’t there to promote or soothe the Britishness espoused by unionists.

    I strongly believe Britishness doesn’t recognise its very own Irish dimension and never has.

    If there was a part of Britishness that is patently Irish and which is celebrated by the British state and the British people, I would like to hear of it.

    Anybody I have ever met who says they are “British and Irish” would never vote to live in a state with other Irish people.

    British always has primacy. In the GAA, it’s the other way round.

  • Lafcadio

    George – so you were born in Dun Laoghaire, you live in Cork, are not and never have been a member of the GAA, have no history as a participant in the sports, and are for the most part an armchair spectator, although you attend occasional championship games where Dublin play; well, with the greatest respect, and interesting though your personal views undoubtedly are, it would nonetheless be nice to hear from someone more representative of the GAA community, specifically in NI.

    You never know, maybe we’ll have someone actually engage the issues raised by drawing on something more than the GAA’s “mission statement”, and end up with something more instructive than “..leave your Britishness at the door”..

  • George

    Realist and Bluedemon,
    The GAA’s definition is not of Irishness but of a unique constituent part in Irishness.

    It is extremely interesting that both of you immediately jump for the bigotted and narrow-minded clubs to bash it with.

    Why is this uniquely Irish experience such a problem for unionists?

    Just because this unique part of Irishness is repugnant to unionists, this in now way means it is bigotted and narrow.

    Sometimes I think this is typical of a common and ingrained British attitude that Britishness is somehow superior to Irishness.

    In other words, Irishness can only be open and non-bigotted if the purifying agent that is Britishness is included.

    Both of you fail to realise that by demanding the GAA represent all on this island, you are the ones narrowing the definition of Irishness.

    This is rubbish in my view. Uniquely Irish is just that, uniquely Irish. It’s not narrow, it’s not bigotted and it’s not sectarian.

    You can enjoy the uniquely Irish GAA experience as a Protestant, Catholic or dissenter.

    Lafcadio,
    it doesn’t mean I can’t talk about the GAA or that I don’t have point. You’ve probably never been a member of a unionist party but doesn’t stop you from understanding unionism.

    Alright, maybe some GAA members can tell me if I am right about what I wrote.

    Have a nice weekend all. Will look back in Monday.

  • bluedemon

    I am not British. I am not a unionist. I still don’t like the GAA’s Irishness. Irish dancing is no less Irish eventhough it includes everyone and you don’t need to check anything at the door. Likewise for the Irish language and the organisations that promote it at least here in the south.

  • Bluedemon
    What’s your problem with the GAA in the south? In the south playing Gaelic sports is just the same as the Irish langauge or Irish dancing or Irish music, it’s just something you do that you are interested in. They don’t tell me how to be Irish or what kind of Irish I am or how to think. I can be who I am and I don’t need to “check anything at the door”.

  • Conor

    heres one and i dont care what you’s do {editors} FUCK ALL of ye unionists swines. if ye’s have a problem with GAA take it to Croke Park and do something about it. otherwise stop sitting in your armchairs reading the newsletter and crying over something ye’s know nothing about and leave us to ourselves.

  • Realist

    I take it Conor’s comments are NOT representative of official GAA thinking.

    Anyways, I’m an Irish News reader. lol

  • bluedemon

    Realist Conor’s comments are identical to official GAA thinking. They just have got better at PR and soften the message.

  • bluedemon

    I don’t think official GAA thinking is identical to Conor’s, perhaps you’ve found it amongst those ‘political rules’ i asked you to point out on the other thread on GAA?

    Moderater

    Maybe you’ll remove Conor’s comment?

  • bluedemon

    GAA rules forbid playing of foreign games in Croke Park. GAA have only recently changed rules forbidding the north’s security forces from playing. There are rules that Irish goods should only be used which must be against EU laws.

    There is no evidence that the GAA has ever tried to reach out and include others.

  • BD
    “Realist Conor’s comments are identical to official GAA thinking”

    Of course you’d know being in the GAA an all? Or are you just spouting more shite?

    “GAA rules forbid playing of foreign games in Croke Park”

    No they don’t. I suspect you’re like quite a few people here, never actually read and rule and no clue what you’re actually talking about.

    “There are rules that Irish goods should only be used which must be against EU laws.”

    So??

  • Conor

    Bluedemon,

    get with the times son, the GAA have ‘reached out’ as you put it and also changed the Rule not permitting security forces to play in Croke Park. not that it matters to you does it? are you looking to play gaelic? no i dont think so. so whats the big deal then? are you just being a prick for no reason?

  • Brian Boru

    Protestants who are Nationalists should not feel excluded from the GAA. The GAA has every right to retain its Irish Republican traditions. I would recommend however that the GAA remove Provo names from its grounds, though not Old IRA ones, as they freed the South of Ireland.