Mrs May to go, but what is to come next in the Brexit zone?

So, she’s gone. Or she will be in a week or two.  I have to say it is hard not to have compassion for someone who has suffered in the press the way Mrs May has. Politically, it’s hard to not to be harsh.

Delivering Brexit was not an impossible task, but she made it infinitely more difficult for herself by running to the country for a mandate and finding only that she’d only replicated the marginal Brexit majority the Brexit referendum had delivered. Hindsight is a marvellous thing.

Fundamentally, the referendum forced her (and many other parliamentarians) to act against her own original better judgement.

This is one of the reasons that my good friend and former colleague Paul Evans argued with the ardency of a firm disbeliever back in 2010 here on Slugger that Referendum(b)s are a completely nuts way to consult the people.

Whoever takes over from her also takes on the same level of risk she’s been trying to juggle. Whoever it is (and Boris Johnson seems to be the favourite at the moment) cannot afford to play political games with it.

There are limits to the popularity game which gave rise to Brexit in the first place. Over time, as the far right in The Netherlands may find out on Sunday, populism can make you less popular than you think.

Writing before her resignation, Robert Shrimsley in the FT said

The government has disintegrated, the Conservative party is fracturing, faith in the political process is ebbing away. Some new sense of direction is necessary, though many MPs believe that what comes next could make us nostalgic for the May era.

Her failures were legion and she contributed hugely to the sense of crisis but she did at least at the end, accept the realism of the situation and see a higher duty in trying to prevent the worst outcome. [Emphasis added]

So shall we hang on for the ride, or is Brexit just destined to be a state of mind rather than an actual state of being?

Answers in the comment zone, please… ⬇️