• Concubhar O Liathain

    It seems surprising to me y that the logo is only in English. Didn’t the Sinn Féin and SDLP councillors see it before it was signed off to ensure there would be an Irish language version – or the DUP/UUP, recent converts to the cause of Ulster Scots, did they not think an Ulster Scots version would add cultural depth to this very flimsy logo.

  • ted hagan

    It needed good bold colours to stand out, which might help it a bit. It’s a bit wishy-washy and feeble as it stands.
    I take it the article is referring to Qantas, rather than Quantas?

  • Séamus

    I don’t know if they’re official, but there’s an image doing the rounds of the logo in Irish and the Hamely Tongue.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4f71ac42b311d620aeb58b5de0d2fe7d38b72f25680fa437f0a6f407cb7fe64a.jpg

  • ted hagan

    Any Polish ones to keep Arlene happy?

  • Brian O’Neill

    As its text based its easy to switch the text to whatever is needed.

  • Easóg

    It’s so easy to switch that the Gaeilge is switched off. We have a non unionist city and a non unionist council but we still have the colonial mindset.

  • Brian O’Neill

    Good post Alan. If the council had spent £500 on it people would still whinge.

    I like it. Good job 🙂

  • Marina Coyle

    It’s not at all iconic – dire would be a better description. Hey-ho, another 45 grand wasted

  • Nevin

    The symbol conveys nothing to me and complete outsiders would be equally underwhelmed. Perhaps they should take a leaf out of the Google or the Coca-Cola book and just play around with font styles. What could be more dynamic than using capitals and possibly italics to play with the city name: Bel Fast

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6e340399d13658283fc31a88856a45fe174bf4444e9ec7b6e3efbc76eb5cd0bc.jpg

  • hollandia

    I quite like this logo. Simple (the best ideas often are), representative and marketable.

  • It vaguely reminds me of the London Olympic Games logo. My initial feeling is that it’s not really distinctive enough as a shape, it lacks something to make it memorable. Anyway, these things have a cost, it’s normal, it’s the price of advertising – those who whine about that can shush up.

    I’m not sure if the call to have a version in Ulster Scots and Irish is satirical or not, but the general idea is 1 brand 1 look 1 thing 1 sell. Not yer brand, thon brand, themuns brand…

  • If it is a marketing sign, then it makes sense to have consistency, simplicity, and brand recognition. If it were in Gaelic, the vast majority of people in Northern Ireland would not be able to pronounce or understand it it, so it would hardly help in marketing NI around the globe. People have heard of Belfast and can do a search for it on a hotel booking site or a flight booking site. People do not know where Beal Feirste is and I’m pretty sure you cant book a flight there with Easyjet or accommodation in Beal Feirste on hotels.com (maybe these companies have the colonial mindset that another comment mentions). It may be appropriate to use the Gaelic in marketing the West Belfast festival for example, as the market is those with an interest in Gaelic culture. But as far as marketing to a global audience goes, its Belfast.

  • Easóg

    The world managed to latch onto Mumbai and Kolkata.

  • Easóg

    Why English,then?

  • Concubhar O Liathain

    I see those points and they’re relevant. I do think that an opportunity is being lost to promote Belfast as a city which celebrates diversity and which is emerging from a conflict in which culture was a battleground. This is what makes a city ‘cool’ in the eyes of visitors – not a ‘logo’.

  • hollandia

    Surely the point is the shape (for want of better descriptor) is the identifier, not the language.

  • Easóg

    Identifier of what?

  • Mary Russell

    Just Googled Béal Feirste, took me straight to the Belfast Wikipedia page, then googled hotels in Béal Feirste, guess what, straight to a list of Belfast hotels, not that difficult for strangers to find out where Béal Feirste is. You may not be able to book hotels, flights etc. using Béal Feirste, but you can sure find out that it’s Belfast.
    In the interest of learning, what is the Ulster Scots name for Belfast.

  • hollandia

    Whatever it is you are selling. That’s how advertising works quite a lot of the time. You begin to associate a logo or shape as a brand identifier.

  • Mary Russell

    Just found it. Bilfawst…guess what, it works too. Maybe now all communities can use their own variations, and we can all be happy.

  • Easóg

    You mean to say that if you are intending a city break, you google all the city logos and then make your choice. Weird or advertisers’ bull. ImAgine 12 people slaving over a hot desk for months to produce that.

  • hollandia

    No that’s not what I’m saying at all, as well you know. If a car is coming towards you, you don’t google the logo, you generally know what it is – especially non written ones such as Toyota, Audi, Chrysler, Mercedes-Benz, Renault, Citroen etc. That’s brand recognition. Its really not a difficult concept.

  • Easóg

    It is difficult if you have a healthy contempt for advertising and brand recognition. Are you saying that this logo is for foreigners and of no relevance to us locals? As regards a few puffed up individuals spending other people’s money, the old proverb springs to mind: a borrowed horse is hard dhriv. (The hameley version)

  • hollandia

    No. What I’m saying is what I’ve said in my previous post on the matter.

  • babyface finlayson

    I think you are making a reasonable if somewhat cynical point.
    I don’t quite get what a city logo achieves. No one will be any more likely to travel to Belfast on the basis of a cool logo (I don’t find this logo cool but that is a matter of taste I suppose).
    I can’t recall paying any attention to any logo of any city anywhere ever.
    I suppose it might be argued that it is part of an overall branding strategy of promotion and that is how all cities sell themselves.
    Maybe it works on a more subliminal level.
    The cost is not huge and I don’t want to denigrate the work and enthusiasm of the team behind it, since anything of this nature is easy to mock.
    It is easy to have a ‘healthy contempt for advertising and brand recognition’ as you say but without it how would we know where to find stuff?
    So in conclusion, I am undecided about this.
    Take that dogmatists!

  • Well, as others have said, you can probably slap extra text down over the logo. Frankly though, there would be comparatively bog all interest in advertising worldwide the Belfast Brand in either Irish or UlsterFry. Maybe they both exist already anyway? I don’t know if what we’ve seen is the entirety of the resulting commissioned work or not.

  • Well Google is smart like that. It doesn’t really matter that it is relatively simple to find out that the three names are one, what matters is that it is one extra step, and each step will carry an information loss.

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Semiotics and the Cognitive theory work of Piaget. MS windows seized it and you’re using it yourself several times a day.

  • hollandia

    I agree. I think the text is secondary.

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Of how united we are and how cohesive the society of our wee place is even if it does look like a cartoon version of a broken window pane.

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    If we can all be happy then we might become one community. Whooda thunk it?

  • Ben De Hellenbacque

    Hmmmm, the cool colours of a chemical product inconsistent with the word ‘fast’. Don’t apply for work in graphics.

  • There are Irish and Ulster Scots versions! Excuse the blurred photo … https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/56ec0e41d53db88c7ec400ab74179bf609ef71cdcdfca625f4a08e2b67019423.jpg

  • Stifler’s Mom

    Looks like meaningless corporate branding. That sort of logo is suitable for corporations, but not for cities or countries. Those places have a history and usually have various symbols associated with them. Picking a well known symbol and perhaps adjusting it a bit with colour, texture, stretching, etc would have been a better option.

    Angular shapes like star bursts, diamonds, triangles are more associated with ecstasy tablets these days.

    Didn’t Queens university get rid of their old symbols and replace them with a bland shape? Only to reintroduce the original symbols?

  • Stifler’s Mom

    although many Indians still use Bombay and Calcutta.

  • Nevin

    So both ‘cool’ and ‘fast’ – not bad for a colour-blind bloke!

  • MainlandUlsterman

    I quite like it.

    As with a lot of logos the point is not so much what it is but how much it is used. Use a logo a lot and most half decent logos get some recognition.

    Evaluating them (part of my job) is more about screening out the bad ones than choosing something ‘perfect’. That said, for it to get currency it needs to be distinctive and memorable *enough*.

    The reason it’s worth having, for me, is in bringing a sense of, for want of a better word, chutzpah to communications about the city – a sense of it being a defined place with a vision for itself and a certain determination about driving that through. Having a logo at all is the first bit of signalling. Then not having a sh*te one is next. Then you can start getting into what it’s saying about you.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    I suppose it might unconsciously reflect the shattering windows that marked Belfast’s nineteenth century riot “tradition”..,,,,,,