How’s about a nice wee cup of tea, or coffee…

From Nolan, without further comment…

  • the rich get richer

    What was that substance that the Nuns were said to put in peoples tea to reduce friskiness .

    It surely wouldn’t hurt to try on the Storm-outies !

  • Brian O’Neill

    Bromide.

    Lithium bromide was used as a sedative beginning in the early 1900s, but it fell into disfavor in the 1940s, possibly due to the rising popularity of safer and more efficient sedatives (specifically, barbiturates) and when some heart patients died after using a salt substitute (see lithium chloride).[5] Like lithium carbonate and lithium chloride it was used as treatment for bipolar disorder.

    It has been said that during World War I, British soldiers were given bromide to curb their sexual urges,[6] although this is not well supported by documentation, and has been disputed as an urban myth, as the sedative effects of bromide would have hampered military performance. Lord Dunsany mentions a soldier being given bromide as a sedative for nervous exhaustion and overwork in his play “Fame and the Poet”(1919).

  • the rich get richer

    Cheers. Is the lithium bromide bluestone.

    I would have thought too much(maybe not that much) of that could be extremely hazardous to health.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Brian, my uncle, who was an officer in The Royal Irish Fusileers spoke of the rather liberal use of Bromide in WWII. So it’s use outlived WWI……..perhaps if the Stormont tea ladies…….

    I’m used to finding that perfectly normal things that did not receive extensive textual provenance by “experts” come to be regarded as “urban myths” by those who did not either experience them, or know someone who actually did experience them. I find that my rather chaotic Marcusist, “liberal Marxist” associates in the PD during the late 1960s, for example, have transmogrified into fiendish “Trotskyists” in the hands of most recent historians, and am frequently told so when I dispute this, usually by those who were not actually there. I’m often reminded of a California police woman who had taken one of those tours to the wee six in the wake of the GFA, speaking to my wife about “Traveling over the border into County Antrim”. When she was told that Antrim is the only county that does not touch the border, and that my wife lived in county Antrim herself, the California lady emphatically replied to my wife, stating that she was wrong, as the tour guide, an expert in these things, had certainly said they were entering County Antrim just before they reached Crossmaglen!

    But bromide was a dire reality, my uncle occasionally supervised its addition to the soldiers food, “carefully”, he said, “so as not to kill everyone!”

  • gendjinn

    My great uncle from Monaghan ended up in the RIF after his original regiment was almost wiped out. Said he saw an officer or two take one from their own men, amongst other interesting anecdotes.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    My uncle used to box for the regiment, so he “took a few” from the rankers himself, “officially.”

    Irish regiments tended to have scant respect for officers, such as Montgomery, who would not get down amongst their men. Another case of “false memory syndrome”, the media version of old Monty.

    What was your great uncle’s original regiment? Just interested!

  • the rich get richer

    Do you mind awfully if I report you and your old boys to the politically correct police.

  • gendjinn

    Oh don’t get started on Monty, we’d be here all day. Band Of Brothers characterized him and his military “genius” quite aptly I thought.

    The father was having trouble tracking down the original regiment – probably the Connaught Rangers given where he’s from and the stories he told.

  • the rich get richer

    I would’t argue with any of that.

  • gendjinn

    I’m not sure it was an over-reaction. It was Linkedin – a professional recruiting site. AND he even led his comment off with “I know this is inappropriate but…”

    Thing is, you don’t know how many other times it’s happened to her on top of the rampant misogyny in the legal field. From what I’ve seen in the software industry in “liberal” San Francisco I can’t blame this woman for publicly shaming him. It’s the only thing that’s going to bring the change women deserve, the change they need.

  • ranger1640
  • John Collins

    I do not think it is bluestone, which I have reason to believe can have fatal consequences if consumed. But again I may have fallen victim to a rural myth. BTW did anyone see the recent article outlining how bluestone was first uncovered as a commodity suiting the control of potato light?

  • SeaanUiNeill

    My uncle spoke of Monty almost snatching defeat from the jaws of victory when he re-hashed “The Auks” plans to turn Rommel’s advance. Few officers who met him on daily basis could retain Churchill’s perception of the man for any length of time.

    A puritan martinet, who (surprisingly in the light of his own sartorial eclecticism) put soldiers he met on a charge for any tiny infringement of dress regulation. Anecdotally, it began when he passed a jeep driver entirely naked except for a solar topee and regulation boots as he was driven into Alexandria from the plane on which he arrived. He did not quite have the poor man shot…

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Thank you! I was recently discussing the Connaught Rangers and their striking war record in the Great War with some people in Dublin. They Connaught Rangers were full of West Belfast boys who did not join the battalions of the Ulster Division, as surprisingly many others did.

  • Nevin

    Here’s a video link to the committee session. Tea and coffee 4m in – and next week’s ‘free lunch’ at 1h 3m in. You can also learn about the future DfC – the Department for Communities.

    I got a laugh from Arlene on Tuesday in the gift and coffee shop when I showed her my £1.15 purchase – for the day that was in it!

  • Brian Walker

    Definitely a footnote of history…

  • SeaanUiNeill

    I’ve come on a great deal of how this kind of thing harms even very self-reliant women, and the back story of the woman’s own experiences of quite serious abuse on the trading floor in an earlier career make her response quite moderate in my opinion. The flood of hatred and mockery that has erupted at her across the internet, and the warnings that she has now aborted her career make me even more inclined to find her response fully justified.

    Thanks genjinn for your perceptive comments here.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Auchinleck is frequently criticised for his own failures against Rommel, but he was starved of the sort of logistical support that Monty and Alexander could deploy after the Auk was sacked, or so I was told. Interestingly, the Alamein engagement was rooted in the Auks plans, which, I was also told, Monty simply did not understand. Luckily for Monty the logistical famine was now Rommel’s. Despite what Wikipedia tells us, I have as yet to meet anyone from the North African campaign who has anything but praise for Auckinleck’s command decisions at the time.

    They certainly did not hand out MMs without some serious action, so your late father in law is someone to be proud of. And the Auk did not simply rubber stamp such recommendations, so his name means something here. I wish you every good luck in your researches.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    Respectfully, Anglo=Irish, not every woman has had a decent man for a father, with the empowerment that brings. I know of all too many vulnerable women who have achieved some professional success but for whom such “compliments” are profoundly threatening and invasive, flagging as they do ugly experiences of aggressive sexualised pressure at earlier points in their careers and lives.

    But I should also say that I come from a generation that holds doors open and offers seats on crowded trains to women, and still feel upset when I’m snubbed for such actions.

  • Nevin

    Bluestone is copper sulphate and it was combined with washing soda and water as a mixture to control blight.

  • Nevin

    Curiously enough, Charlotte doesn’t appear to have a problem with legal firms using appearance as a means of touting for business:

    Proudman has been using LinkedIn since she was an undergraduate. “I was embarking on a career in a competitive profession and wanted to connect with likeminded lawyers to enhance my prospects,” she says. “Being on LinkedIn is encouraged by chambers — it can help attract clients.”

    Having a photo is standard practice, “to be more personable”, and she has heard of companies that organise official photo shoots for their staff’s LinkedIn pictures and will talk about how women should dress and what makeup they should apply. .. source

  • gendjinn

    If only we wouldn’t show up to fight, just leave the generals and the monarchs to it, the world would be a far better place.

    Blake’s 7 had a decent episode along those lines.

  • gendjinn

    I’ve heard the same things about Auckinleck. That Monty was parachuted in so that the right kind of person would be taking the credit for victory in North Africa.

    Monty exemplified the saying “Amateurs study strategy, professionals study logistics.”

  • the rich get richer

    Well Doh ! (only joking)
    Why o why don’t we do this ?

  • gendjinn

    Ahhh, I get it now – “she was asking for it” was she?

  • gendjinn

    It takes greater courage to be shot at dawn than to follow orders and kill others.

  • Nevin

    I don’t know what you’ve got but I hope it’s not contagious.

  • gendjinn

    Don’t worry, you’ve been immunised against logic & facts.

  • Nevin

    If I can coin a phrase, you’re a quare jeg.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    I’ve had a career in film and television, with a lot of involvement with the music business through the sudden requirement for music videos for every newly released song from the 1980s. With sexual harassment and abuse rife, I like to think that I could use the fact that I ran a small company of my own to develop a safe space for those very talented people (actually both male and female, don’t forget the possible abuse of men) who were working with me.

  • SeaanUiNeill

    I think it turned out alright because of the massive effort to organise a future campaign by the Auk and those who preceded him. My uncle always contended that had Richard O’Connor, who first developed many of the features that would characterise the successful north African fighting, not been stripped of the forces he’d beaten the Italians with [to be squandered in Greece] and been captured soon after Rommel’s arrival, there might have been a much earlier end to the north African campaign. But what happened happened, and Monty became a household name standing on the shoulders of others, although little O’Connor was hardly a giant in anything but military skill.