Interactive remembrance of Iraq & Afghanistan casualties

20111217 CNN Casualties Map

Interactive map of Iraq & Afghanistan casualties

While reading an article about the withdrawal of American forces in Iraq — and in particular its city of Kirkuk — a participating member of the Forum for Cities in Transition, one of my work projects — I came across a link to an interactive map that displays every single casualty of the coalition forces serving in Iraq and Afghanistan:

http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/war.casualties/index.html

You can zoom in the maps, and by placing your mouse cursor over an individual hometown, see the solider’s details. At the same time, you’ll see where that person died on the corresponding map on the right.

It animates the fact that real persons died in real places, while serving their country.

I zoomed into Ireland to investigate. What surprised me, but shouldn’t have, was that there were a few casualties from the Republic of Ireland, for both the Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns.

As a matter of record, here is a list of those casualties:

IRAQ

  • Cpl John Johnston Cosby (Belfast – Basra)
  • Lance Cpl Timothy Darren Flowers (Derry-Londonderry – Basra)
  • Lance Cpl Ian Keith Malone (Dublin – Basra)
  • Capt Ken Masters (Portadown – Basra)

AFGHANISTAN

  • Cpl Sean Binnie (Belfast – Musa Qaleh)
  • Ranger Justin James Cupples (Co. Cavan – Sangin)
  • Ranger David Dalzell (Bangor – Nad-e Ali)
  • Ranger Aaron McCormick (Coleraine – Nad-e Ali)
  • Lance Cpl Stephen McKee (Banbridge – Lashkar Gah)
  • Marine Robert McKibben (Co. Mayo – Garmsir)
  • Lance Cpl Nigel Moffett (Belfast – Musa Qaleh)
  • Capt David Patton (Aghadowey – Helmand province)
  • Lt Nel Turkington (Craigavon – Lashkar Gah)
  • Cpl Stephen Walker (Lisburn – Sangin)
  • Rory Carr

    Good job its not a map of civilian casualties of the coalition forces, Mr Ulster. The mapmaker would very soon run out of little dots to represent the numbers. As to names, so many were obliterated entirely that no records, no certainty of their death other than their absence is there to tell of their time on this earth of of their leaving it.

    To the victor the spoils it seems even the spoils of remembrance of the dead.

  • The odd thing is the way these wars were so unpopular….”dodgy dossier” and all that that the Government, newspapers etc are on the wagon with ever more acts of remembrance……..”Royal Wootton Bassett” and the Christmas #1 and every Premiership football match has regulation tributes indicating that Britain is becoming as jingoistic as USA.
    Some friends living in England sent us a “charity” Christmas card which they did not realise had “Help For Heroes” among the charities. Mindful of my alleged sensitivities, they highlighted another listed charity and put a little note saying “Tell XXXX that my money went here”.

  • pauluk

    FJH1745: ‘Britain is becoming as jingoistic as USA’.

    Actually, the term originated in Britain in 1878.

  • pauluk

    What a shame that after Bush (eventually) won the war in Iraq, at great cost in men and materiel, that Obama has now created the conditions for losing the peace. Washing his hands of the fledgling democracy in Iraq so arbitrarily will, I reckon, come back to haunt him.

  • RepublicanStones

    Mr carr has hit the nail on the head with comment number 1.
    Surely we should be more concerned with civilian casualties?

    that Obama has now created the conditions for losing the peace.

    Your comment would make sense if it werent for the fact that it was under Bush that the Status Of Forces Agreement (SOFA) with the Iraqi government, was agreed, laying the groundwork for the recent withdrawal.
    And if its democracy in Iraq you are concerned about, have the decency to accept the democratic will of the Iraqi people in wishing to either have the foreign forces in their land abide by and be held accountable to Iraqi law – or having them vacate. And vacate under the auspices of an agreement signed by the Bush administration.

  • pauluk

    RS,
    This New York Times article sums up Obama’s diplomatic failure in Iraq a lot better than I ever could.

  • pauluk

    RS,
    PS Today, again from the NY Times, we see the consequences of the absence of a strong, steady hand to help maintain political stability in Iraq.

    Obama bears a huge responsibility for how things are already beginning to unravel in Iraq. I repeat, he’s losing the peace.

  • Paul uk……youre absolutely right.
    The word itself originates as an anti Russian sentiment as evidenced in the line about Constantinople.

    But Im not sure about your point. Modern USA is much more jingoistic than Modern Britain and Im not suggesting that either USA or Britain have designs on Constantinople.

    While the term orinated in Britain, the sentiment is not confined to Britain.

    My point is that Britain might have originated in Britain, USA adopted to it.
    The term Concentration Camps was originated by the British after all………yet Im sure youd agree they tend to be more associated with Nazi Germany.

  • RepublicanStones

    And it doesn’t even do that. In fact it puts more of the blame on Bush…

    At the end of the Bush administration, when the Status of Forces Agreement, or SOFA, was negotiated, setting 2011 as the end of the United States’ military role, officials had said the deadline was set for political reasons, to put a symbolic end to the occupation and establish Iraq’s sovereignty.

    And as I said earlier – if its Iraqi democracy you’re concerned about…

    This time the Americans asked them to take a stand on the question of immunity for troops, hoping to remove what had always been the most difficult hurdle. But they misread Iraqi politics and the Iraqi public. Still burdened by the traumas of this and previous wars, and having watched the revolutions sweeping their region, the Iraqis were unwilling to accept anything that infringed on their sovereignty.

    the only part of that article you link to that could be construed as being critical of Obama is this…

    Some American officials have privately said that pushing for that meeting — in essence forcing the Iraqis to take a public stand on such a controversial matter before working out the politics of presenting it to their constituents and to Parliament — was a severe tactical mistake that ended any possibility of keeping American troops here past December.

    Thats a grand total of 5 lines out of the entire article and even then it’s some off the record, on the QT hearsay.
    Fact is, it was under Bush that the time limit and agreements were set for US troop withdrawal. I guess he could have helped Iraqi democracy by completely ignoring it…

    http://thinkprogress.org/security/2011/10/25/352776/surge-architect-keane-preserve-iraqs-democracy-keep-u-s-troops-there-against-its-will/

    Never mind the fact that if he were to do so, he would not just be opposing Iraqi democracy, but also the overwhelming portion of the American public

    http://www.pollingreport.com/iraq.htm

    See what you’ve gone and done, you made me defend Obama. Something i’ve grown to dislike greatly.

  • RepublicanStones

    Pualuk please elaborate (at length if need be) on how keeping US troops in Iraq for a while longer will put to bed and absolve Iraq of the centuries old internal struggles between differing factions and denominations, which are older than the United States itself? I can’t wait….

  • pauluk

    RS,
    ‘it puts more of the blame on Bush’

    Now you are talking absolute rubbish. Obama’s inexperience and non-ability in foreign policy has been a disaster. Even Matt Damon, like yourself, has twigged on to him.

    Obama’s amateurism in being unable to follow up on Bush’s agreements with longer-lasting accords with the Iraqis, sadly, could have dire consequences.

    And, btw, modern Iraq has only been a political entity since 1920, it’s not ‘centuries old’! Of course, Mesopotamia is the ‘cradle of civilisation’, and has seen its fair share of wars and strife, not unlike many other parts of the world which are now peaceful, functioning democracies.

    I think it is rather insulting to Iraqis when you suggest that they cannot live in peace. I suppose people have also said the same thing about the people of NI. How wrong they were!

  • RepublicanStones

    Even Matt Damon, like yourself, has twigged on to him.

    You do realise that the reason a lot of Obama’s former supporters dislike him is because he has doubled down on a lot of Bush’s policies. And why you chose to prefix Matt Damon’s name with ‘even’ alludes me. Is he the final arbiter in all matters political?

    Obama’s amateurism in being unable to follow up on Bush’s agreements with longer-lasting accords with the Iraqis, sadly, could have dire consequences.

    He couldn’t (for the third time) because of what Bush had put in place.

    And, btw, modern Iraq has only been a political entity since 1920, it’s not ‘centuries old’!

    Ummm, who claimed that? im well aware of the age of the lines drawn by colonial powers on the maps of the middle east. I was talking about the sectarian divisions in ‘Iraq’ or the ‘pashalik of Baghdad’ or whatever you want to call it.

    I think it is rather insulting to Iraqis when you suggest that they cannot live in peace

    Where did i even claim that? I asked you to explain how prolonging US troop presence will do away with the sectarian tensions. (which you didn’t do). Nowhere did i suggest that they are incapable of living together peacefully. please don’t try and put words in my mouth.

  • RepublicanStones

    Now you are talking absolute rubbish.

    Actually im not. As the article you linked stated…

    At the end of the Bush administration, when the Status of Forces Agreement, or SOFA, was negotiated, setting 2011 as the end of the United States’ military role, officials had said the deadline was set for political reasons, to put a symbolic end to the occupation and establish Iraq’s sovereignty.

    See emphasis.

  • RepublicanStones

    Don’t ask why i typed ‘alludes’ instead of ‘eludes’.

    Those dam ludes….