Tory Eurosceptics prepare a ‘retrieval of powers’ plan if Greece leaves Euro

Not sure what realistic chance they’ll have of being successful, but it’s clearly an attempt to set the agenda in advance of any major shock to the system:

If Greece were to be ejected from the euro, EU treaty changes would be required to clarify the situation and any such renegotiation among all 27 member states would inevitably prompt calls from Tory MPs to repatriate powers. Thirty MPs from a new all-party parliamentary group met on Thursday to discuss EU social policy and identify a set of powers they would like to see returned to the UK should a treaty change arise in the coming weeks.

Europe’s difficulty; Britain’s opportunity?

  • FuturePhysicist

    The powers we are looking here at are things like human rights charter legislations which are too liberal for the Tories, almost everything else they’ve surrendered willingly and won’t try to get back.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/libertycentral/2009/oct/04/human-rights-act-conservatives

  • More likely a Euro treaty than an EU Treaty. So little room for negotiations. It is not about the rules it is about implementation. Our common law system has a more specific (detailed) approach, whereas civil law juristidictions have a more general interpretive way of taking on Brussells missives.

  • “The powers we are looking here at are things like human rights charter legislations which are too liberal for the Tories”

    Human rights law does not arise out of the EU treaties. It is governed by the European Convention on Human rights but judgments in that legal arena, such as the one where Britain was forced to give up its DNA database of people who are not criminals is the sort of decision which does not help Britain’s relationship with the EU.

    Most of the EU law is concerned with commerce and trade. The maximum 48 hour week and perhaps one or two other aspects of Employment law are areas where British politicians (particularly Conservative ones) are likely to take objection to but otherwise, there is not an awful lot which is alien to the British. It is what they might do in the future which could cause difficulties and which gives the odd Conservative MP a sleepless night. Perhaps they could force UK drivers onto the right hand side of the road!

  • DC

    Why should the Tories have powers back? That party has hardly proven itself capable of handling existing powers – first up the mess over immigration & border control being a case in point.

    Secondly, the economy – if not the main priority – control over it is seemingly still held in domestic hands and no one – not one political party – has explained where the £1 trillion has gone in terms of the banking bailout – which banks, and why – who was to blame etc. Where is the narrative on this issue, also what is to be done to prevent this happening again?

    Where has the money gone first and foremost – if the Tory party can democratise the economy and get money back off the corporations then maybe – just maybe – social powers etc should be returned.

    Trouble with the Tories is that they just want social powers back from the EU with a view to clamping down on employment laws and social problems like rioting and going all right wing on that kind of behaviour – at least the EU sticks up for minorities – the disabled, those that are gay etc.

  • Reader

    DC: Where has the money gone first and foremost
    Shouldn’t you be addressing that question to Gordon Brown, rather than the tories? In any case, most of the trillion you referred to was in the form of guarantees, and never actually left the government’s books.
    DC: clamping down on employment laws and social problems like rioting and going all right wing on that kind of behaviour
    Do you prefer the French approach to rioters (european, but hardly gentle)?

  • DC

    Most of the trillion – how much exactly?

  • As the Economist points out, the Tories are unlikely to get much from the EU under these circumstances.

  • FuturePhysicist

    Maybe, Cheaper Greek holidays perhaps Nick.

  • abucs

    Not a good advertisement for the European Union when one (but more to follow) of its member countries is a financial basket case who can’t pay it’s debts.

    12 million Greeks can cause so much damage to Europe?

    It’s hard to see Ohio in the United States causing comparable damage and being booted out. There is something very wrong with the management of the European story.