Getting rid of the foreign influence in Ireland…

This was a great spot by reader Edward…. Adds: Picked up by Politics.ie where it’s being said the ‘British’ design is often used by private contractors… For reference here’s the full set of Irish roadsigns

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  • pippakin

    fordprefect

    Its all about money. It will encourage tourism if the Queen comes here and it will encourage business and tourism for Derry to be the UK city of culture. In both cases I totally understand and agree with the need to encourage jobs, tourism and money into the state.

    I think Gerry Adams said he was not in favour of the Queens visit, I don’t care. I can guarantee I won’t be in Dublin and I doubt she will be visiting my street in the wilderness.

    You’re right southern media is not as reverential to SF but really they hardly needed to bother with hard questions. SF got the easy ones wrong.

  • tacapall

    Driftwood I dont believe in religion Im more of a Michel Foucault type personality. His you only live once so enjoy every moment of it attitude speaks for itself.

    The Irish people were pagans in the past but took up christianity via St Patrick the catholic version. As for their way of life well were they not allowed to practise that religion, were they murdered or thrown off their lands, were they deported to other countries, were they starved to death by landlords who exported meat etc and watched them die in their thousands when their staple diet the patato crop failed. Did the english not try to eradicate their language.

  • fordprefect

    Pippa
    Yes, but, my point was, SF are holding themselves up as “holier than thou” republicans. That was why I mentioned Doublethink. Here in the north SF said far more than “not in favour of the queens visit” they were very harsh about it! By the way LOL@ your comment on the southern media!

  • pippakin

    fordprefect

    Yes, but its been a long, long time since the current SF leadership did anything but doublethink and double speak. I have heard of forked tongues but some senior Shinners have forked brains.

  • fordprefect

    Nun
    No, I didn’t and still don’t think everyone in authority was “in on” 9/11 (nor do I believe in any of the crackpot conspiracy theories that emanated from it), I think the killings of the almost 3,000 civilians was horrific. Of course people were frightened after it happened (who wouldn’t be?). But the fact remains that Bush and Co. ratchetted that up that fear to get away with almost anything they wanted. Also re your smart remarks about me sending solidarity greetings to Iraq and Afghanistan, I really feel sorry for those american and british soldiers who were killed/maimed and their famillies, as they shouldn’t have been sent in the first place.

  • tacapall

    Noneoftheabove I believe that 9/11 was a false flag carried out by people other than those who were blamed, why go into Iraq and Afganistan when the majority of those they claimed carried out the attack were saudi’s, the Bush administration were bursting to go into Iraq and Afganistan to exploit those countries natural resources.

  • Comrade Stalin

    MV:

    Ever so often I get an em from a contact that advise my to ‘stop winding the orangemen they do not have a sense of humor, they are likely to take what you say seriously’ !

    I don’t think there is any imminent danger of you being taken seriously.

    I have been involved in publishing all my life …

    Ah jaysus here we go.

    Whoever in Sinn Fein knocked that sign together probably got the task because they had aptitude for it and more than likely were sympathizers or supporters of Sinn Fein rather than party members.

    So Sinn Fein are stupid enough to farm out an important thing like a manifesto design to a bunch of muppets ? I think we probably agree there.

    It is not high art but it ticks off all the boxes for fit for purpose functionality and that is what counts.

    I agree there. I quite like the design and the way the message is presented. But that isn’t the point. The detail which is relevant here is that the UK-ishness of Sinn Fein is something that seems to be there at a subconscious level.

  • Dixie Elliott

    The Hypocrisy is amazing considering PSF have posters plastered all over Derry advertising a so called event to commemorate the anniversary of Frank Stagg.

    The posters have at the top a Remember The Hunger Strikers, 30th Anniversary logo alongside the logo of The X Factor….

    The wording is…

    1981 Hunger Strike Committee/Tar Abhaile

    Anniversary of Oglach Frank Stagg

    Saturday 12th February @ Sean Dolan’s GAA Club

    Doors open 9pm

    Sponsored: Sinn Fein Factor Sing Off

    Host: Dermot “Nunga” O’Leary

    Judges: Louis “Paul Fleming” Walsh

    Simon “Raymond” McCartney” Cowell

    Danii “Martina Anderson” Minogue

    Cheryl “Elisha McLaughlin” Cole

    Taille: £3

    All proceeds go to the 1981 Hunger Strike Commemoration Committee.

    This is a sick, ill thought out attempt at making a quick buck out of the memory of the Hunger Strikers. I’m sure that the likes of Bobby Sands and Big Tom McElwee who were proud Gaeilgeoiri and the other Hunger Strikers who had a love of everything Irish would be appalled to think they were being remembered by something so British as the f-cking X-Factor.

    Whats wrong with an Irish night? Oh thats right PSF in Derry are now into everything with a UK connection.

    Anyway why do the so called 1981 Hunger Strike Commemoration Committee need to raise money? I’m sure the other Republican groups who held commemorations over the years didn’t need money, it costs nothing to walk from A to B.

  • Dixie Elliott

    Also as somebody pointed out on a Republican forum….

    “X Factor is used for pro British war propaganda so it should be removed from a republican poster. Disgusting.”

  • pippakin

    Dixie Elliott

    I don’t like to rub salt in the wound (much) but they could have used the Irish version. If they had bothered to find out there is an Irish version that is.

  • fordprefect

    Dixie
    I agree, apart from the X factor being british and promoting british war propaganda it’s complete shit! Anyone who watches it has to be a brainless moron, hold on I’ve hit on something there! That’s why SF are holding it! Apart from that, I’m sure SF MLA’s, MP’s and Councillors could fork out a few quid from their “industrial wages”, so, they wouldn’t have to have this pathetic load of bollocks!

  • Dixie Elliott

    They could even donate some of the money to the X-Factor ‘Heroes Charity’….

    http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=2H0XFLMJSB8&feature=related

  • tacapall

    Dixie look whats happening in Iraq and Afganistan, Africa and around the world, a modern day land grab we are a distraction, a model to use as a springboard for control. We are puppets, the 26 county government sold our country to foreigners the Shinners became the foot soldiers of the elite, there is no escape.

  • fordprefect

    Tacapall
    I understand what you are saying, but, please don’t be so defeatist.

  • tacapall

    Fordperfec, Im not being defeatist, Im a realist, im saying the rules of war have changed, body bags can be portrayed by those who control the media in a favourable light for themselves. Hitting them in their pockets is a different matter entirely – There is no unlimited purse string in todays world.

  • fordprefect

    Tacapall
    I agree with everything you said there. Those who control the media, I take it that’s a reference to governments and the likes of Rupert Murdoch? I took my own small stand against that years ago (encouraged people then and now, not to buy their malevolent hate rags), the only paper I shell out for is Private Eye. I know it’s (probably) a pipe dream, but, if all working class people stood together (don’t let any political bandwagon jumpers near you) and say, the price of whatever goes up, don’t buy it, boycott the shops, pubs, whatever. Apparent monolithic political entities appear to big to be overcome but they can/have been, eventually people wise up to them. As a great man once said: “The great only appear great because we are on our knees, let us rise”!

  • slappymcgroundout

    “Dixie look whats happening in Iraq and Afganistan, Africa and around the world, a modern day land grab…”

    What land has the US grabbed in either Iraq or Afghanistan? You can add in Africa as well. For how completely dim is your idiotic screed, when the US actually had a colony, the Philipines, a certain law put a cap on how much land could be owned by Americans in total and by any American in particular. No other occupying power has ever had such a law. We were otherwise the occupying power for less than 50 years. Lastly, you might invest some time in a decent education, not to learn names, dates and places, but a critical thought process.

    Dixie:

    And you could donate to these folk:

    http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=NFBsVbwBgLU

    http://il.youtube.com/watch?v=nDpuAHkVM5Q

    There are your glorious heroes. Lastly, and by the way, the late Mr. Patrick Henry is rolling over in his grave owing to your pretense of having anything to do with love of liberty. In other words, you wouldn’t know liberty if it were alive, hard sharp teeth, and bit you in your behind.

  • Brian

    “oneoftheabove I believe that 9/11 was a false flag carried out by people other than those who were blamed, why go into Iraq and Afganistan when the majority of those they claimed carried out the attack were saudi’s, the Bush administration were bursting to go into Iraq and Afganistan to exploit those countries natural resources.”

    Yes, 9/11 was undoubtedly a CIA/Mossad job.

    BTW, what natural resources are the US exploiting in Afghanistan? Hilarious, absolutely hilarious.

    Have you taken a look who got the big oil contracts with the Iraqi government? I’ll give you a hint, American companies got a lot less of them than the Chinese. That is some strange Imperialistic strategy, don’t you think?

  • fordprefect

    Slappy/Brian
    It is a land grab, as the yanks think of themselves as the police force of the world, haven’t you ever heard of PNAC? the project for a new american century? You mean the American controlled Iraqi government Brian? No doubt doing secret deals with the Chinese to get a bigger slice of the cake than they are letting on. Who are you Slappy, to tell anyone to go and get an education? You can’t even spell properly!

  • Nunoftheabove

    tacapall

    The natural resources in Afghanistan worth ‘invading’ for being the opium harvest presumably, yes ? Or was it the frightening global shortage of grapes, melons and apricots which persuaded the United States that military intervention was their only option, hmmm ?

  • tacapall

    Slappy, Brian, Noneoftheabove.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_in_Afghanistan

    In 2010, small team of Pentagon officials and American geologists discovered nearly $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits in Afghanistan, far beyond any previously known reserves and enough to fundamentally alter the Afghan economy and perhaps the Afghan war itself, according to senior American government officials. According to other reports the total mineral riches of Afghanistan may be worth over three trillion US dollars. “The previously unknown deposits — including huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold and critical industrial metals like lithium — are so big and include so many minerals that are essential to modern industry that Afghanistan could eventually be transformed into one of the most important mining centers in the world”, the United States officials believe. The Ghazni Province may hold the world’s largest lithium reserves.

    The deposits were already described in the USGS report on Afghanistan issued in 2007. President Hamid Karzai remarked “Whereas Saudi Arabia is the oil capital of the world, Afghanistan will be the lithium capital of the world.” Deposits in the United States and Canada which need mining operations similar to those necessary for the deposits in Afghanistan went out of production due to cheaper production from lithium containing brines. Afghanistan invited 200 global companies for the development of its mines.

    As for your you tube links. How many people do they execute in the USA every year – do they execute women as well.

    http://boingboing.net/2010/04/05/wikileaks-video-of-u.html

    Beating people in public, maybe you dont watch your own news and you can find dozens of differerent clips on the net. Remember Rodney King theres plenty of Rodney Kings.

    http://wn.com
    /5_police_officers_beat_unconscious_man_after_crash,_beating_caught_on_camera

    Brian.

    “Have you taken a look who got the big oil contracts with the Iraqi government? I’ll give you a hint, American companies got a lot less of them than the Chinese. That is some strange Imperialistic strategy, don’t you think”

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/jul/04/oil.oilandgascompanies

    “We” are already heisting Iraq’s oil, or at least are on the brink of doing so.

    It started with no-bid service contracts announced for Exxon Mobil, Chevron, Shell, BP and Total (they have yet to be signed but are still on course). Paying multinationals for their technical expertise is not unusual in itself. What is odd is that such contracts almost invariably go to oil service companies – not to the oil majors, whose work is exploring, producing and owning carbon wealth. The contracts only make sense in the context of reports that the oil majors have insisted on the right of first refusal on subsequent contracts handed out to manage and produce Iraq’s oilfields. In other words, other companies will be free to bid on those future contracts, but these companies will win.

    One week after the no-bid service deals were announced, the world caught its first glimpse of the real prize. After years of backroom arm-twisting, Iraq is officially flinging open six of its major oilfields, accounting for half of its known reserves, to foreign investors. According to Iraq’s oil minister, the long-term contracts will be signed within a year. While ostensibly under the control of the Iraq National Oil Company, foreign corporations will keep 75% of the value of the contracts, leaving just 25% for their Iraqi partners.

    That kind of ratio is unheard of in oil-rich Arab and Persian states, where achieving majority national control over oil was the defining victory of anti-colonial struggles.

  • tacapall

    Slappy, Brian, Noneoftheabove.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_in_Afghanistan

    In 2010, small team of Pentagon officials and American geologists discovered nearly $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits in Afghanistan, far beyond any previously known reserves and enough to fundamentally alter the Afghan economy and perhaps the Afghan war itself, according to senior American government officials. According to other reports the total mineral riches of Afghanistan may be worth over three trillion US dollars. “The previously unknown deposits — including huge veins of iron, copper, cobalt, gold and critical industrial metals like lithium — are so big and include so many minerals that are essential to modern industry that Afghanistan could eventually be transformed into one of the most important mining centers in the world”, the United States officials believe. The Ghazni Province may hold the world’s largest lithium reserves.

    The deposits were already described in the USGS report on Afghanistan issued in 2007. President Hamid Karzai remarked “Whereas Saudi Arabia is the oil capital of the world, Afghanistan will be the lithium capital of the world.” Deposits in the United States and Canada which need mining operations similar to those necessary for the deposits in Afghanistan went out of production due to cheaper production from lithium containing brines. Afghanistan invited 200 global companies for the development of its mines.

    As for your you tube links. How many people do they execute in the USA every year – do they execute women as well. “Beating people in public” maybe you dont watch your own news and you can find dozens of differerent clips on the net. Remember Rodney King theres plenty of Rodney Kings.

    Brian.

    “Have you taken a look who got the big oil contracts with the Iraqi government? I’ll give you a hint, American companies got a lot less of them than the Chinese. That is some strange Imperialistic strategy, don’t you think”

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2008/jul/04/oil.oilandgascompanies

    “We” are already heisting Iraq’s oil, or at least are on the brink of doing so.

    It started with no-bid service contracts announced for Exxon Mobil, Chevron, Shell, BP and Total (they have yet to be signed but are still on course). Paying multinationals for their technical expertise is not unusual in itself. What is odd is that such contracts almost invariably go to oil service companies – not to the oil majors, whose work is exploring, producing and owning carbon wealth. The contracts only make sense in the context of reports that the oil majors have insisted on the right of first refusal on subsequent contracts handed out to manage and produce Iraq’s oilfields. In other words, other companies will be free to bid on those future contracts, but these companies will win.

    One week after the no-bid service deals were announced, the world caught its first glimpse of the real prize. After years of backroom arm-twisting, Iraq is officially flinging open six of its major oilfields, accounting for half of its known reserves, to foreign investors. According to Iraq’s oil minister, the long-term contracts will be signed within a year. While ostensibly under the control of the Iraq National Oil Company, foreign corporations will keep 75% of the value of the contracts, leaving just 25% for their Iraqi partners.

    That kind of ratio is unheard of in oil-rich Arab and Persian states, where achieving majority national control over oil was the defining victory of anti-colonial struggles.

  • Nunoftheabove

    tapacall

    That’s how much more under domestic democratic control in Iraq than was the case pre-intervention ?

    In terms of the mining potential you refer to, are you, with a staright face, arguing that this was the rationale for the invasion ?

  • tacapall

    “That’s how much more under domestic democratic control in Iraq than was the case pre-intervention”

    Noneoftheabove maybe you should go to the link again and read the whole article about the oil contracts in Iraq.

    I can ask you the same question can you say with a stright face that the invasion of Afganistan was about bringing democracy to the country.

  • Nunoftheabove

    tapacall

    So you don’t want to answer either question ? The intervention in Iraq was primarily about regime change -moving moving Iraq into a post-Saddam place – and it happened later than it should have happened. After all, it had been official US policy since 1998.

    While there were ample grounds on which to base this intervention, I would have my criticisms about how the rationale for it was positioned with the public in the immediate run up to it and more so about the way that it was planned and implemented but I can’t bring myself to a position where I’m sorry that it did not happen and am under no illusions about why it happened.

    For what it’s worth, I would strongly prefer to have the oil under democratic hands or under the control of companies amenable to democratic governments than in the hands of a sadistic and criminal enterprise. I am under no illusions about that either.

    I have read the article you posted and Klein’s “Shock Doctrine” – arguments such as “the invasion of Iraq neatly creates the argument for its subsequent pillage” might impress some people; sloganeering left-wing students and credulous members of Eirgi seem to be mightily impressed by it, for instance. Respecting peole’s right to believe arguments like that is some distance away from saying that I respect them for believing it.

    I’d invite you to critique this article if you’re rigid in your view that the intervention was for and about specifically US oil interests:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2009/12/13/us-iraq-usa-oil-idUSTRE5BB18Q20091213

    To broaden this out somewhat, if predictions about oil production made by the Iraqi goverment turn out to be true, then Iraq’s output could fairly soon rival that of both Saudi and Iran. Having this as a by-product of (rather than arguing that it was the reason for) the intervention is, by non-reactionaries at any rate, to be welcomed, I’d have thought. A democratic Iraq situated between two sinister theocracies and capable of challenging their oil duopoly. I’d call that progress – wouldn’t you ?

    Perhaps Kein could bring herself to research and publish an article or two on Saudi funding of Sunni ‘insurgents’ in Iraq (or indeed Iranian funding of Shiite ‘insurgents’, for that matter) and ask herself why she thinks that might be; I’m sure she could introduce an oil motivation to those articles if she tried hard enough.

  • tacapall

    Noneoftheabove – “and it happened later than it should have happened. After all, it had been official US policy since 1998”.

    What give America the right to decide regime change in another country, who made them the world police force?

    Maybe you just dont get the point of the arguement –

    “After years of backroom arm-twisting, Iraq is officially flinging open six of its major oilfields, accounting for half of its known reserves, to foreign investors. According to Iraq’s oil minister, the long-term contracts will be signed within a year. While ostensibly under the control of the Iraq National Oil Company, foreign corporations will keep 75% of the value of the contracts, leaving just 25% for their Iraqi partners”.

    The deposits were already described in the USGS report on Afghanistan issued in 2007. President Hamid Karzai remarked “Whereas Saudi Arabia is the oil capital of the world, Afghanistan will be the lithium capital of the world.” Deposits in the United States and Canada which need mining operations similar to those necessary for the deposits in Afghanistan went out of production due to cheaper production from lithium containing brines.

    “Afghanistan invited 200 global companies for the development of its mines.”

    Is the democracy and regime change you’re talking about more about forcing those countries to open up its markets and access to natural resources to the same people who are financing the war on terror. Or are you just going to bullshit us about human rights issues if so I can name you plenty of countries that need to be invaded but wont be because they have no valuable natural resources.

  • Nunoftheabove

    tapacall

    “need to be invaded” ? – so no objection in principle to invasion then – thanks for confirming.

    Of the 75% figure you refer to, what % of those are US-owned/backed please and of that % how many of them were direct participants in the military intervention ? (clue – I’ve already provided you with a good steer on that)

    Ok, leave aside 1998 if you want – explore it nonetheless though and let me know where you come to the oil exploitation parts – there are four grounds on which sovereignty may be breached in international law and Iraq was multiply in breach of a number of them and in plain breach of all four. Are you honestly going to pretend that you don’t know what these are ? I’ll re-post them if you like and discuss them point by point but if you dont know what they are already I submit to you that you do not have any knowledge of the subject on which we’re speaking or have no real interest in the facts of the matter.

    Were you content to adopt an isolationist position and leave Saddam ‘to it’ incidentally ?

  • tacapall

    Noneoftheabove “need to be invaded” I was being sarcastic. We’re going round here like a dog chasing its tail, so what you’re saying is that America/Britain invaded Iraq costing both countries £$ billions or trillions on the American side plus the cost of human life in terms of lost personell all because of human rights and democracy for the people of Iraq and Afganistan. Very generous of you both especially in a global recession, yeah right !

  • Nunoftheabove

    tapacall

    One of us is chasing the other for answers and the other isn’t providing them. Not content with avoiding defending your own corner now – a concession of sorts on your part – high time too – you’re now wanting to throw my punches for me. I’m comfortable defending my own arugments thanks, you worry a whole lot more about your own.

    By the way I don’t believe that your last sentence is sarcastic, not by any definition that I recognise anyway.

  • fordprefect

    Nun
    No, the primary reason for invading Iraq was “weapons of mass destruction” another lie fed to the American people so that the Neo Con nutcases could do what they wanted. As Tacapall said, who do the US think they are, invading sovereign states and trying to impose their form of “democracy”. By the way, I notice the US doesn’t make any threats of invasion against North Korea (in case they DO have weapons of mass destruction) that’s how brave the yanks are! I laugh (sarcastically) when I hear about the US condemning other countries for human rights abuses, executions etc. (I am totally against the death penalty) when America executes people that are/were mentally retarded.

  • slappymcgroundout

    Uhhh, hate to break the news, but Seoul is in range of DPRK heavy artillery. That explains the caution.

    “Estimates of the damage that could be inflicted by a North Korean attack range from bad to apocalyptic. Lee Yang Ho, defense minister during a similar nuclear crisis in 1994, said one computer simulation conducted during his term projected 1 million dead, including thousands of Americans.

    It is assumed that if the United States were to strike North Korea that the North Koreans would fight back,” Lee said. “All industry would be destroyed, gas stations, power plants. This is such a densely populated area that even if North Korean artillery were not very accurate, anyplace you would hit there would be huge numbers of casualties.””

    Here, one of your UK overlords:

    http://www.rogerhelmer.com/seoul.asp

  • Dixie Elliott

    slappymacwhatever, you said and had me chuckling…..

    “There are your glorious heroes. Lastly, and by the way, the late Mr. Patrick Henry is rolling over in his grave owing to your pretense of having anything to do with love of liberty. In other words, you wouldn’t know liberty if it were alive, hard sharp teeth, and bit you in your behind. ”

    So, because I criticize the Anglicism of PSF and their insult to the Hunger Strikers of which you typically have no answer I’m a supporter of some dastardly group or other?

    Also, you are also a member of IR.net? If so you’d know that I sent Patrick Henry off to live with the Tibetan Monks in the Himalayas in case there’s a global catastrophe and theres no higher place than the Himalayas in the event of a deluge is there?

    Or more exactly I stopped using that name over there and started using my own name being as everyone knew who I was anyway, unlike your good self. You have the brass-neck to lecture me on liberty when your heroes on the PSF leadership went as far as trying to outlaw all kinds of street protest, something they build careers on….

    Maybe they were trying to stop others who are following from coming down the same road and they needed it blocked off?

  • Nunoftheabove

    fordperfect

    Ain’t going to rehearse for you – yet again – the grounds on which the sovereignty of another country can be legitimately challenged and breached under international law; you’ve been told about it before and you don’t want to hear about it. At least be honest about it and admit that the Ba’athist regime was in violation of those (in some cases multiply so) and despite that – for all I know because of it – you still supported it, just as you do the ‘resistance’ to the transition to a democratic federal Iraq facilitated by international military intervention. And don’t you even dare call the al Qaeda component of that ‘insurgency’ anti-imperialist – just don’t try – and neither have the balls to deny that serious portions of both the Sunni and Shiite terrorist groups which you have no problem with are sponsored by neighouring theocratic regimes with a very substantial interest in Iraq’s petrochemical competitiveness in the international market.

    With regard to your repudiation of the death penalty, I myself have been a lifelong opponent of it. In your case, it rings altogether more hollow given your support for unashamedly totalitarian and decidedly pro-imperialist Islamist suicide bombers.

    If you straightforwardly loathe the current US state and/or US citizens then at least have the moral fibre to say so.

  • fordprefect

    Nun
    America and “Israel” are terrorist states! I support ANY “insurgent group” that wants to expel an invader from their country.

  • fordprefect

    Nun
    Why has “Israel” ignored (with contempt) every UN sanction brought against it? Answer me that one, at least, instead of hiding behind the bullshit?

  • fordprefect

    Nun
    Why would I hate the American people? I don’t. Also, don’t tell me what to think, as far as I’m concerned, the biggest “terrorists” in the world today are the US administration, who think they can do whatever they want with other nations!

  • fordprefect

    Nun
    You are most definately the biggest BORE and ASSHOLE I’ve ever had the misfortune to come across! (don’t insert any joke about that!)

  • slappymcgroundout

    Thomas, I was replying to this:

    “X Factor is used for pro British war propaganda so it should be removed from a republican poster. Disgusting.”

    and also

    “They could even donate some of the money to the X-Factor ‘Heroes Charity’….

    http://il.youtube.com/watch?v= 2H0XFLMJSB8″

    I would otherwise rather be found dead than be found a member of IrishRepublican.net.

    I can also think of any number of reasons to not make one’s name more public than it already is, and you can start with identity theft and work your way on down the list. Otherwise doesn’t matter the name as the argument stands on its merit, unless, of course, you’re a lover of the logical fallacy of the argument from authority.

    Next, you and yours over on IR.net are so reflexively anti-British that you remind one of Pavlov’s dog. So if you wish to speak to chuckles all around, yes, IR.net is certainly good for that. But, regretably, there’s more than chuckles. You see, you and your mates at IR.net are at heart profound racists. How else could you deny an entire group of humans the ability or capacity to change in any significant respect over the course of 800+ years. And so you and the like-minded here are found defending the fascist Ba’athist regime of Iraq and the miscreant Taliban in Afghanistan against the British. And in doing so, you skip over some rather elemental matters, one of which is that the leaders of the former Orange state in NI had a greater claim to legitimacy than did the Ba’athists in Iraq, since at least the leaders of the former Orange state did represent the majority population, which is something that one cannot say about the Ba’athist regime in Iraq.

    If that is something that you wish stand over (your phrase) by voicing the sentiment in your own name, then have at it. By the way, for the other side of the coin, not only does my name not appear on posts that might be rather unflattering with respect to my person and character, my name also does not appear on posts that might work to the credit of my person and character. So it works both ways, something you never seem to remember. That’s how absurd your criticism here.

    But there’s still one more. Last time you raised the matter, you made the equally absurd claim that some, me included, only say such things concerning the likes of Mr. O’Rawe because we are “gutless” “cowards” who hide behind the anonymity. Sorry, Thomas, but I rather doubt that anyone is afraid of either you or Mr. O’Rawe, as there’s nothing whatsoever to fear. And that’s in every sense and respect, from the both of you being the opposite of intellectual giant to that bulge around your middle there indicating that you probably couldn’t run around the block without need of oxygen tank support.

    Lastly, no one in Sinn Fein is my “hero”. Neither are any humans who starved themselves to death (I can think of any number of better ways of making a point). And as I said last time, it was simply immoral for the late Mr. Sands to stagger the strike in any event, since once he dies, the moral pressure on the others to continue then becomes overwhelming. Some love he had for them… And here you now sit in front of your computer and stand out there in public complaining of some others using yet others as pawns. As we here say, Puh-leaze! The late Mr. Sands has already done enough of that.

  • tacapall

    Slappy the american armchair revolutionary.

    The truth will set you free.

  • fordprefect

    Slappy
    You mean the artificially created “northern ireland”? Just like Iraq the british and their cohorts carved it up before they were booted out in the 20’s.

  • Dixie Elliott

    Slappy for someone who “would otherwise rather be found dead than be found a member of IrishRepublican.net.”

    You seem to know a lot about it even the fact that I used the name Patrick Henry there. I’ve never mentioned that here therefore you must’ve been on IrishRepublican.net to know that.

    Oh and I’ve no problem with people using fake names on the internet. My problem lays with gutless people who attack those not afraid to go public like Richard O’Rawe, hiding behind aliases to do so.

  • fordprefect

    Appauds Dixie!

  • fordprefect

    Dixie
    Go on my son!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • tuatha

    How did such a topic/thread turn into the ‘nya,nya’ above? 140+ posts FCS! There’s an election for the Dail, unarguably the most important decision to be taken for the future and … I’m with yeats, ‘..mere anarchy ..the good lack all conviction…what rough beast…slouching towards …” WHAT? C certainly NOT the future.