Service announcement: Minor Facebook / Twitter-related tweaks to Slugger

At the top of this post, there’s a lovely new ‘Facebook Like’ button and a ‘Tweetmeme’ link on the left. These are designed to help you flag up anything you read and like to your followers as well as giving our contributors a bit of feedback. These things only work, of course, if you’re on Facebook / Twitter.

Looking at the poor quality of spelling and punctuation in the comments thread, we know that you are all crying out for a reinstatement of the ‘preview’ option for commenters 😉

Apologies for the delay – we’ve got a great one in mind, but it conflicts with our theme at the moment and we’ll need to get that all sorted before we can activate it.

Let us know (in the comments, below) if either of these new buttons mess with your browser in any way. They shouldn’t – I’ve used them on lots of other sites without a hitch.

  • Mack

    Paul this is true – from a publishers perspective –

    These are designed to help you flag up anything you read and like to your followers as well as giving our contributors a bit of feedback

    That’s a proxiamate reason for their presence on web content.

    What they’re (ultimately) really designed to do is give Facebook & Twitter behavioural data on your (possible) purchasing intentions and to build up a demographic profile of you so they can sell targeted segments to advertisers – (as the image is hosted by Facebook, they use it to track which web pages you are viewing and which they like). Google analytics provides Google with similar data (as does chrome! every character you type into the address bar goes back to Google). Whether it’s evil or not is moot at this point – it’s ubiquitous.

    Scott McNealy was right –

    “You have zero privacy anyway, Get Over it!”

    http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/1999/01/17538

  • Yep. You know the old (er… I mean new) adage, ‘if you’re using a service and you aren’t paying for it, you’re not the customer, you are the product….”

    I’m not sure that evidence of reading Slugger will give too much commercially useful data to Facebook either. If we were a consumer-oriented blog, the value would be clearer.

    It’s not without it’s upsides to users though. There’s plenty of evidence that a lot of Slugger commenters like the ‘community’ aspect to the site an this enhances the opportunities for that. The other question is traffic. Sunny Hundal at Liberal Consipiracy reckons that Twitter is now his single largest referrer – so in terms of driving up traffic (and the community aspect again) it’s useful.

  • USA

    Mack,
    You are tuned in dude….

  • Mack