The day David Cameron became more than a Tory leader…

I must confess to having experienced very little surprise at David Cameron’s firm stand and unequivocal performance in the British House of Commons yesterday, other than the degree of dignity with which he carried it off  (I see Paul Bew concurs) and the utter silence in the house on all sides as he made his highly detailed speech. Detail which was delivered him by the forensic, PhD nature of Mark Saville’s report.

Owen Paterson may have got some of his calculations wrong in the run up to the election, but it always seemed to me he was determined to take Saville by the scruff of the neck. Levels of trust I would say are currently unseasonably high in nationalist Northern Ireland.

Unionism could do worse than follow his example (see Drumlin’s piece above this one) and try to lead from the higher moral ground. As I argued yesterday, the state retains its democratic legitimacy precisely because it holds itself to higher account than insurgent organisations…

That aside, although it is possible always to overstate the importance of the kinds of political theatre we saw yesterday in Westminster and, just as if not more importantly, the city of Derry, Cameron made his first big play as PM and came through with his reputation and status greatly enhanced…

Mick is founding editor of Slugger. He has written papers on the impacts of the Internet on politics and the wider media and is a regular guest and speaking events across Ireland, the UK and Europe. Twitter: @MickFealty