Will Saville suffice?

Is a torrent of eloquence in Andersonstown News a republican move to soften up public opinion for rejecting the Saville Report and the start of a new phase of campaigning on this and other major cases ?

The writer is

  • Convinced that “Saville will spin the deaths as isolated, accidental, and the result of poor training and communication and the cover-up of all that as misguided. It will not be the last word on one of the conflict’s most grisly episodes.”
  • Projects to other unresolved chapters like the Monaghan-Dublin bombings, the Cory inquires and Stevens.
  • Seeks to embroil the Cameron government in further initiatives rather than restrict them to Stormont commitments and budgets.
  • Sets these cases in an intellectual context of the writing of history

With the rejection of Eames/Bradley and Cameron’s own desire to draw a line under the past“, and an end to “more costly inquiries” the Saville report presents Westminster and Stormont with a choice of redoubling efforts or drawing some sort of line after existing inquiries report. Martin McGuinness’s attitude will be crucial here. He appears to be arguing that the real legacy of Bloody Sunday is the peace process and the deal with the DUP. Whether new demands emerge beyond the telling of stories about the past remains to be seen.

Former BBC journalist and manager in Belfast, Manchester and London, Editor Spolight; Political Editor BBC NI; Current Affairs Commissioning editor BBC Radio 4; Editor Political and Parliamentary Programmes, BBC Westminster; former London Editor Belfast Telegraph. Hon Senior Research Fellow, The Constitution Unit, Univ Coll. London