“The skies are completely empty over the major part of northern Europe”

Brian’s optimistic post yesterday proved premature as restrictions on flights in Ireland are re-applied. Restrictions elsewhere have also been extended until, at least, 0100 0700 BST on Sunday. And an Irish Times report quotes Brian Flynn, assistant head of network operations at the European aviation body Eurocontrol.

“The skies are completely empty over the major part of northern Europe,” said Brian Flynn, assistant head of network operations at the European aviation body Eurocontrol. “It is very difficult for any significant movement of air traffic in the northern part of Europe to take place . . .Whereas the disruption is major and unprecedented in Europe, it is unavoidable given the nature of the problem,” he told reporters in Brussels. The ash cloud has already led to the cancellation of flights in countries as far apart as Austria, Belgium, Britain, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Sweden.

There are also a number of tales of alternative travel arrangements. Adds Live RTÉ updates, BBC updates, and more on the European situation. [New RTÉ link]

  • Michaelhenry

    its a bad time for those stuck away from home because of aircraft grounded, but those who want to come home because of a family bereavement must be in a lot of distress.

  • It’s great for those non-travellers of us under the Heathrow flightpath. Particularly when we can also bask in Schadenfreude over the friends and acquaintances not jetting off to far-away places with strange-sounding names.

    Now, what did Jeremy Bentham say about “the greatest good of the greatest number”?

  • Rory Carr

    “The skies are completely empty over the major part of northern Europe”

    But I thought the whole problem for these aviation bods was that the skies were in fact completely full – of volcanic ash that is.

    Anyway the No. 73 bus is still running so what’s the problem?

  • Pete Baker

    Adds Live RTÉ updates, BBC updates, and more on the European situation.

  • al

    I live under the flight path to Leeds/Bradford and on such a lovely sunny day it’s nice to have no planes thundering overhead or contrails. People are in too much a rush anyway to go places. Just glad I didn’t go home from university at Easter, not too keen on a 10hr trek by water.

  • wild turkey

    malcolm

    totally off topic, so the rest of you can ignore

    My first degree is in voodoo for white boys. in the eighties they called it economics.

    obviously Bentham is someone to be acknowledged and confronted. but to this day, i have difficulties squaring Betham ,Tom Jefferson and the pursuit of “happiness”.

    given your above post, is utilitarianism a moral or political stance?

    curious, thats all mate

  • wild turkey @ 09:09 PM:

    My little brother (I am assured) used to give an excellent introductory lecture to first-year undergrads on the topic of utilitarianism.

    It is based on the controlled pedestrian crossing outside the university. There is an optimum timing to any crossing. Too long imposes additional costs on the road traffic: that is bad for the economy. Too short may imperil the lives of OAPS, whose abbreviated collection of benefits may thereby represent a gain to the economy. The loss of the odd student under the wheels of a bus is debatable: were the victim a potential Einstein or Shakespeare that might be regarded as a cost not to be borne, but most are interchangeable and easily replaced. etc. etc.

    As for Jerry B, I thought UCL had him well stuffed and still in the closet. The exact topic wasn’t on my syllabus, but I’m assured he wrote an excellent text on pederasty. So, on those grounds, possibly both moral and political.