The right to have your comment taken down and used in evidence against him?

The BBC is reporting a judge in Derry has refused bail in a case of alleged ‘attempted grievous bodily injury’ because ‘he had read that a travel website had advised visitors not to come to the city because of the violence there’.

The only travel website I’ve come across mentioning violence in Derry is VirtualTourist and it only has a single reader comment on the topic not an advisory. I’ve scanned through the much larger Trip Advisor and can’t see anything there.

Has anyone seen anything more substantive on another website? Should websites really be impacting on bail?

  • joeCanuck

    Mark,
    That is so disingenuous and a complete distortion of what the BBC report said. The linked report said that the magistrate refused bail because “violent crime had to be dealt with seriously.”
    He did not not say it was because he had read….

  • Harry Flashman

    Derry is my home town, I’m still very fond of it but there’s no getting away from the fact that it is a very violent town. It’s not violent in the sense of Baghdad circa 2005 or Ciudad Juarez in Mexico during a drug feud but there’s no getting away from the fact that Derry seems to have a seriously dysfunctional attitude to casual random violence directed at individuals.

    If you live there you take it for granted. You assume that everywhere is like Derry, that walking through the commercial heart of the city centre at 10pm and keeping an alert eye open for the threat of getting a hiding from a group of young hoods is perfectly natural and just what one would expect in any town around the world. Furthermore if you take your chances after 1am well don’t be that surprised if you spend the rest of the day being patched up along with drunks and winos in Altnagelvin’s casualty ward.

    It actually comes to a shock to some Derry people to discover that this sort of thing is not “just a bit of crack” but is in fact disturbingly abnormal. Casual, wanton beatings meted out to complete strangers in public streets is in reality a horrific aberration which is evidence of a society in severe need of psychiatric evaluation.

    I have walked through areas of extreme deprivation in many third world cities with appalling poverty rates and deprivation but I have never encountered the sheer brutalistic, mindless thuggery and public loutishness which the citizens of Derry, most of whom live very comfortable financially secure lives, seem to regard as some sort of affectionate idiosyncrasy that’s just part of life in lovely wee Derry.

  • aquifer

    Yep some of the injuries reported in the last few years there were gruesome. And it cannot all be the fault of british intelligence.

  • wild turkey

    “I have never encountered the sheer brutalistic, mindless thuggery and public loutishness which the citizens of Derry, most of whom live very comfortable financially secure lives, seem to regard as some sort of affectionate idiosyncrasy that’s just part of life in lovely wee Derry.”

    Harry,

    Dead on.
    Read Paul Theroux in Kingdom by the Sea about his stay in Derry.
    Did you contribute to the ‘City of Culture’ submission(s)? If not, you missed your calling.

    good luck

  • old school

    I don’t think it’s as bad now as in the 70s and 80s.
    Particularly in the early to mid 80s, when “up the hoods” was more visible on the walls than “up the provos”.
    The youth then, almost wore the badge of being a hood as some kind of statement.
    Glue sniffing skinheads in the early 80s could be seen everywhere, and when not fighting each other they picked on the first punter who passed.
    It seems more prevalent now as people report the assaults as part of the compensation culture, whereas in the past it was sorted out with a damp cloth and an aspirin.

  • aquifer

    “people report the assaults as part of the compensation culture”

    Or maybe they think people being injured is wrong and they would not like it to happen to anyone else.

  • old school

    No. I’m saying in the 70s and 80s people mostly didn’t report the assault to the cops or the media.
    Now, if they want compo, they have to go to the cops, doctors, solicitors etc.
    Less assaults are happening but more are being reported.
    Of course criminal assaults are wrong.

  • aquifer

    Were the secondary schools in Derry and around particularly brutal?

  • Brian MacAodh

    You can just get beat up for walking down the street at 10pm?

  • Alias

    “It seems more prevalent now as people report the assaults as part of the compensation culture, whereas in the past it was sorted out with a damp cloth and an aspirin.”

    If you look at the CSO crime stats you’ll see that there has been a fivefold increase in indictable offences in Ireland since the start of the 70s, so a ‘compensation culture’ wouldn’t explain that spike (particularly when criminal injuries compensation only out-of-pocket expenses and bills). The liberal society promoted a disregard for social norms and conventions, and inevitably undermined social morality, so that’s the ‘culture’ in play there.

    Northern Ireland, of course, is a world leader when it comes to crime: murders, rapes, and robberies.

  • Alias

    Typo: “…criminal injuries compensation only [b]cover[/b] out-of-pocket expenses and bills…”