Pissing about with parades

After noting the ways Stoneyford POVFB will go about getting around Parades Commission rulings by taking to the fields, I’ll also note how well behaved their colour party and speeches from the Orange Hall seemed to have been – despite the notable exception of current band leader, Paul Smith;

“the band will walk in the village of Stoneyford at a time and date of our own choosing.”

But the St Patricks parade in Killrea also suffered from those that seek loopholes as the clearly republican Sons of Ireland Flute Band, and not invited to the parade, applied to march the exact same route, at the exact same time as the return leg of AOH Division 387 Gortrighey’s day out.

Tacky, guys.

  • joeCanuck

    Mark,
    You somehow forgot to mention why the comments have been closed on your previous thread. Do you need a moderator to remove inappropriate comments?

  • joeCanuck

    BTW Mark,
    If you click on the blog title you can still read the comments that caused you to close commenting.

  • joeCanuck

    This might not be the optimum thread for what follows but here goes.
    I cannot sleep tonight; it may be because I am excited about the return tomorrow of my wife from a spring trip to Paris with her sister. I love her dearly.

    Here is a rant; those allergic to rants can stop reading.
    I mentioned the situation of Christy Walsh on the closed down thread; no one commented. This man was/is the victim of a serious case of incompetence/malfeasance by the Public Prosecution Service (PPS). The PPS have shown themselves time and time again to be unfit for service. The soon to be appointed Justice Minister needs to clean house.
    In that vein, on his/her first day of service, he/she should suspend every Quango under their purview and dismiss their heads with appropriate severence. Then a fast review should be done as to the need to reinstate them, and if so, with new appointees, the existing ones being allowed to reapply in the interest of fairness.
    I don’t know who is responsible for the Victim’s Commission but the same thing needs to happen to it. It doesn’t need 4, now 3, commissioners. I don’t personally think the Commission is needed at all. But, if it is to be retained, under the new dispensation where everything is hunky-dory in “The Good Ship Stormont”, the FM and DFM could demonstrate it by appointing a single commisssioner. There are thousands upon thousands of non-aligned women or men who could do a great job. It doesn’t necessarily have to be an Alliance Party member.

    End of rant for now, at least until I get out of bed again.

  • joeCanuck

    Sorry folks, I’m still up. Same applies to the NIHRC. They also are unfit for purpose. See, for one example, their involvement/wish to be non-involved in the Christy Walsh case that I mentioned. This poor (literally as well as figuratively) man had to represent himself before the High Court at one stage in his odyssey to clear his name.

  • Mayoman

    “I have now got possession of serious and incriminating material on the PPS. It’s in the hands of my lawyers. I gathered it at the end of my appeal last Tuesday and that is going to be explored and I think the PPS will be in a lot of hot water when things are revealed.”

    Here’s hoping Christy Walsh can carry this through. I found it interesting that the ‘charge’ faced by Christy Walsh, relating to posession of a ‘coffee jar bomb’ when stopped by the army in 1991, was the same excuse (posession of a ‘coffee jar bomb’)used by the army in 1992 for the murder of Peter McBride. A preferred choice of easily planted/invented evidence?

  • Mayoman

    Thanks for alerting this story to me Joe, one I will follow with interest, but with faint hope of anything like ‘justice’ as an outcome.

  • “I have now got possession of serious and incriminating material on the PPS. …. I think the PPS will be in a lot of hot water when things are revealed.”

    “Here’s hoping Christy Walsh can carry this through.” –Sure can, –like not done before. UTV inform me that they plan to air this stuff Monday week –so keep a watch out.

  • FitzjamesHorse

    The story of Christy Walsh is sadly not untypical.
    Acts of injustice….and let me say upfront that Murder is an act of injustice. The ultimate one.

    But acts of injustice were routine in some ways. The Birmingham Six and Guildford Four were acts of injustice by (mostly) the Police but there wasnt much sympathy around for six men on the fringes of militant Republicanism in the West Midlands or for some folks living in squats in London. Hence it took a long time to have their names cleared.
    The Maguire family were also victims of injustice and the shocking thing is that it took so long to clear them. They were “respectable” people.

    So is Christy Walsh. And he was then too. The key thing in Norn Iron is that he was a victim of the Army, who were always less scrupulous about “evidence” than the much maligned (often justified) RUC. In the very early days large numbers were scooped in riot situations and lied about.
    In fairness to the RUC they were usually more discerning about who they “framed”.
    In a remarkable act of carelessness (note sarcasm) Billy McKee and Frank Card were driving around in a car with a few bullets in it.

    Now theres an irony here.
    Especially in early 1970s.
    The IRA hated the RUC much more than they hated the British Army. To the ordinary Catholic civilian this seemed strange. In retrospect it was because the British Army made so many mistakes (ahem) that they were the recruiting sergeant the IRA needed.
    With obvious exceptions the RUC were better behaved to the ordinary civilian. TRying to adhere to “rules” and often trying to actually be good police officers (the very reason militant republicans hated them).

    Before the primacy of the RUC was established the kinda thing which happened to Christy Walsh happened.
    But often the RUC actually helped “innocent” victims. So Im curious to see what role the POlice and Lawyers played at the time.