“the thoughtfulness became glibness; the intelligence, duplicity.”

A late entry in the occasional TV review of the week competition comes via Will Crawley. Here’s AA Gill in today’s Sunday Times

Stepping through the story of the cruci­fixion, Adams plainly saw the IRA and his activism cast in the figure of Christ — a freedom fighter sentenced by a cynical occupying power — when, in truth, he was far more obviously and damningly suited to the role of Caiaphas, the expedient political operator willing to sacrifice his own people to maintain an orthodoxy and a grip on worldly power. Inevitably, what it reminded me of was Life of Brian and the squabbling of the People’s Front of Judea: “What have the ­British ever done for us?” It was Adams 0, Christ 1 (own goal).

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  • FitzjamesHorse

    Fifth thread on Gerry Adams & Jesus.
    A bit obsessive but par for the course from the usual suspects.

  • Dec

    Given that Gill stiff’s the occasional baboon ‘to see what it’s like to kill someone’, he’s probably not best-placed to serve up character evaluations of others.

  • John O’Connell

    Glad to see that Jesus won in AA Gill’s world but Caiaphas is the man who was prepared to sacrifice one man, Jesus, in order to save the people. “Better that one man die than a whole nation perishes.”

  • Paddy

    What was Adams’ goal in all of this. Was it like George Galloway on Big Brother? Most likely, I think it was his craving of respectability. Of course, it was also an easy £10k.

  • Adams will probbly be quite happy to be reassured that his many TV appearences are summed up fairly positively as:

    “For years, he’s been interviewed by aggressive, overkeen TV hard men, and has come away looking reasonable, thoughtful, committed and intelligent. If not exactly Ulster’s Mandela, then certainly a member of the romantic pantheon of Erin’s freedom fighters.”

    The key point, which was well made by Adams and ignored by most reviewers was that everybody picks the bits of religion that suits their fancy and politicans connected to all sizes and shapes of states and many brands of insurgencies claim both divine approval and convienently ignore those apsects of scripture not to their liking as witnessed by the religous ceremonies for British soldiers returning from an illegal war in Iraq.

    Understandlby, Adams is unlikley to receive a favourable review from the British press for his interesting angle on a very old story and he will undoubtedly have raised his stock further with his considerable Irish fan club where he still has enjoys almost cult status.

    Perhaps the good old Guardian gave him a fair hearing?

  • Jimmy Sands

    “Given that Gill stiff’s the occasional baboon ‘to see what it’s like to kill someone’, he’s probably not best-placed to serve up character evaluations of others. ”

    On the contrary.

  • Paddy

    Moderate Unionist: Good and thoughtful post. One question: with whom does Gerry Adams have cult status? Sure, the great unwashed of West Belfast vote for him (early and often). But is his stock high down south outside of the Provie belt?

    Side issue: But should he shave off that devil’s beard? He did give up the pipe (and intellectual pretension). Surely the Che Guevara/David Norris beard should also go.

  • old school

    Adams could easily have passed this task to Pat Doherty, who actually studied for the Priesthood, and knows a bit more than waffling.
    But….the man craves the public attention.
    I believe MI5 used this weakness in Adams since the early days, and showered him with flattery and tickled his ego, in the secret talks.

  • Paddy,

    Re. the Adams cult.

    Paddies proper and Irish-mud-bloods various who subscribe to the aspiration of a UI and thought that British rule in Ulster was deserving of some type of insurgency.

    Old school,

    “But….the man craves the public attention”.

    What is quite remarkable is that McGuiness, Adams and David Ervine all seem to take to the telly so seamlessly.

    “I believe MI5 used this weakness in Adams since the early days”

    The idea that MI5 controlled the republican movement is an interesting one and requires the belief, somewhat akin to the theories that the yankees blew up the twin towers themsleves, that the flattening of the docklands and other devastating attacks were an inside job.

  • old school

    MI5 certainly did not control the Provisional movement. There were many honest, sincere members in the Provisionals who had no truck with internal deals with MI5 or MI6.
    They did however control elements in the leadership, protected and promoted by MI5, who guided some unwitting members into a cul de sac, and a British designed agreement.
    You’re one of the few who don´t believe this.

  • old school,

    “They did however control elements in the leadership, protected and promoted by MI5, who guided some unwitting members into a cul de sac, and a British designed agreement.”

    I’m a bit old school meself and when I hear someone trotting out a point of view without any attendant corroboration then I tend to dismiss it.

    Have you got anything you would like to share to back up your case? The sort of thing that I would be looking for here would be those often elusive items that are commonly classified under the heading of facts.

  • Alias

    “MI5 certainly did not control the Provisional movement. There were many honest, sincere members in the Provisionals who had no truck with internal deals with MI5 or MI6.”

    Actually, all potential members of the Provos were vetted by its Internal Security Unit which was run by British agents, JJ Magee and Freddie Scappaticci. If those agents allowed “honest, sincere members” to join then it was because they were thickos who could be easily controlled and wouldn’t have a clue what was going on. Most of the members would have been selected because they had VPs that rendered them susceptible to being controlled – sex offenders especially welcome.

    The Provos had no means of detecting British agents within their ranks since that means was controlled by, err, British agents. It follows that they were infiltrated from top to bottom.