Busty, brunette and 28

No, not words lifted from a pornographic magazine but descriptive terms used by the Sunday Life in a piece on Nick Griffin’s daughter. And this group thinks it is fit to run campaigns on children’s education?

  • Nomad

    You’re very serious, Mark!

  • lolzipoo

    mark likes twenty eight year olds…theres 20 of themcalled

  • andrew white

    is she busty? is she brunette? is she 28? if so whats the problem?

  • Turgon

    Mark,
    Are you sure you are not talking about some new Italian minister whom Silvio Berlusconi has just appointed?

  • okafter a few pintsisuppose

    http://www.hopenothate.org.uk/news/article/1410/BNP-Bosses-Uncovered

    Scroll down to see the ‘buxom’ Comber lass ‘exposed’ in the Sunday World. good journalism Jim!

    A fan of Goldsprings defenders flute band no less.
    Good to know the press are on the case, beating the Daily Mail to the picture.

  • Guest

    Agree entirely with andrew white.The rest is political correct nonsense

  • Jimmy Sands

    “descriptive terms used by the Sunday Life in a piece on Nick Griffin’s daughter”

    Are you sure it’s not a description of her da?

  • Jimmy Sands

    The 28 being IQ obviously.

  • igor

    Well Mark, we let into Government the representatives of organisations that murdered over 3000 of our fellow citizens, friends and relations. Which is worse?

    So if you don’t like what the Sunday Life writes don’t buy it.

  • Dec

    Well Mark, we let into Government the representatives of organisations that murdered over 3000 of our fellow citizens, friends and relations. Which is worse?

    Igor

    It’s early on a Monday morning and normally I’d let that claptrap (and wild whataboutery) pass, but for some reason* today I’m a bit irked by your claim that the IRA was responsible for every death during the troubles.

    *Possibly my friends and relations who were murdered by loyalists and the British Army.

  • John

    igor:

    Well Mark, we let into Government the representatives of organisations that murdered over 3000 of our fellow citizens, friends and relations. Which is worse?

    So if you don’t like what the Sunday Life writes don’t buy it.

    The fact that you think your lot (i.e. the British state, the RUC, loyalist paramilitaries, the B-specials, the British Army) are any more free of guilt than the IRA.

  • foreign correspondent

    One of the many objections I would have to the Sunday Life and to a lesser extent the BT is their adoption of the worst type of English tabloid-speak.
    Another problem is that they seem obsessed with getting the word ‘Ulster’ into every second sentence. Just don’t buy the Sunday Life, I say.

  • Driftwood

    Usual attempts to blacken the name of the army and police who never murdered anyone.

    Sunday Life going for the Sunday World market.

  • salem

    Mark – how did you guess? lol

  • Observer

    Dec

    Sounds to me that you might be on a guilt trip. In fairness to Igor he never mentioned the IRA. He spoke about representatives of organisations (plural!) getting into government. Seems a fairly reasonable statement to me.

    On another issue if you saw the circulation figures for both the Sunday Life and the BT and the trends you could understand the panic at both titles. The Sunday Life has become like some sort of fashion magazine with a bit of news thrown in. Local sport is ten pages in from the back and those first ten pages read like an English title. The BT is actually a good read some nights provided you haven’t read the features a few days before in another of O’Reilly’s titles. For a Belfast newspaper just search for how much Belfast news appears in the BT. Little or none!!

  • kensei

    You couldn’t have posted a pic? 😉

  • igor

    “The fact that you think your lot ………. are any more free of guilt than the IRA.”

    Absolutely. Despite all the Shinners attempts to create moral equivalent there isnt one. And I apply that to Loyalists and Republicans.

    Now first I am genuinely sorry for your loss – and I mean that – but whether individuals were ‘murdered’ depends upon the circumstances of each case. Without knowing yours I would not dare to comment on them.

    Also my original comment was deliberately worded to be inclusive all those MPs, MLAs and Councillors with para-military associations. Do you object to that too or just to criticism of the hypocrisy of republicans?

  • Dec

    Observer

    Sounds to me that you might be on a guilt trip.

    Yes, that’ll be it.

    He spoke about representatives of organisations (plural!) getting into government.

    I’m curious as to what other organisation’s representatives are in government (unless you think being an MLA automatically equates to being in government?).

    Seems a fairly reasonable statement to me.

    Well, if inaccurate off-topic whataboutery is your bag…

  • exile

    Drifty,

    your wind-up attempts are becoming increasingly pathetic. Run along, chap.

  • Toffee Nose

    Strange thing accounting. To some, one dead Prod is worth millions of dead Catholics: no moral equivalence, quality v quantity.

    Nick Griffin’s spawn? An Internet photo. Pathetic paper.

    Papers are not worth buying. Most is rehashed gruel anyway.

  • RepublicanStones

    Drifty me ‘aul flower. Your post at no.13 argues against historical reality. Seems you still haven’t read our friend Kitson. You can download his odious books from torrent sites. And remember that is British Army policy. Further he also served in the north. Please stop deluding yourself. And it seems some still cannot bring themselves to admit crown forces were just as much a bunch of terrorist feckers to the nationalist community as those boyos in the alphabet soup.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Toffee Nose: “To some, one dead Prod is worth millions of dead Catholics: no moral equivalence, quality v quantity.”

    Firstly, find me “millions of dead Catholics” in relation to the Troubles anytime in the last two centuries.

    Secondly, wasn’t it Stalin who said “one dead is a tragedy, a million dead is a statistic?”

  • Fitzy

    Dread…
    “Firstly, find me “millions of dead Catholics” in relation to the Troubles anytime in the last two centuries.”
    I hate to do it, and I’m not trying to reinforce Toffee’s nose, but I think you’ll find the type of numbers you’re looking for somewhere between 1845 and 1850. Also, while not part of the modern era of ‘the troubles’, many would say that Ireland has been in an almost constant sense of turmoil for several hundred years.

  • Fitzy

    Should be ‘constant state’, not ‘sense’.

  • LoyalistBricks

    The republican murder gangs’ cheerleaders are getting more hysterical by the day. Ok so you lost your “war” and it is understandable that you would like to rewrite history to make things sound better to you, but in common with yourselves, it just won’t wash.

    You see there’s a little thing called ‘evidence’. Now that is something quite different from your usual just saying a lie often enough so you start to believe it yourself.

    Now take any Sin-Fin Hard Fish in the Mansion House from any year you like and you’ll recall the wooly-faced boyo reading out the list of death and destruction to the cheers of the gathered unwashed. Back then they were openly happy to broadcast their joy in the deaths of others and didn’t just save it for a given Sunday in Dunloy or other sh*thole.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    ‘Busty, brunette and 28’

    Miss de brun had her day, ye she had it going on.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Fitzy: “I hate to do it, and I’m not trying to reinforce Toffee’s nose, but I think you’ll find the type of numbers you’re looking for somewhere between 1845 and 1850.”

    Ah, the famine…

    First of all, it was not engineered famine, as some argue the Ukrainian famine was.

    Secondly, the technology of the era had no useful response to the famine, so stopping the blight itself was not an option.

    Thirdly, I am not even sure that the an honest argument can be made that the British might have done more to combat the Famine, given the lack of logistical capability of the era. As a matter of fact, there are still logistical difficulties in addressing famine, despite the employment of air transport, let alone based upon sail and steam locomotives.

    Now, did they create a scenario that exacerbated the natural consequences of the Famine — reliance upon a single crop, governmental regulation of both the economics of grain markets and farming in Ireland, the negative feed-back loop created by how the rates were applied — each raise in the rates to pay for local relief led to another wave of dispossession? Mayhap.

    But to confuse incompetence with malice is equally invalid, despite more recent success in blaming the political for natural disasters.

  • Most of the comments above missed the money shot.

    This Slugger headline already has over 200 “hits” on Google, and they’re growing exponentially.

    Nicest bit of “stat-porn” growth I’ve seen lately.

  • Prionsa Eoghann

    Dread

    Sure we have had our disagreements but I usually respect your views, simply because they are knowledgable and informative. After reading the above though I may have to reassess my views.

    >>First of all, it was not engineered famine, as some argue the Ukrainian famine was.< < Always nice to begin with a strawman. >>Secondly, the technology of the era had no useful response to the famine, so stopping the blight itself was not an option.< < In the name ae the wee man..............what are you on about. >>Thirdly, I am not even sure that the an honest argument can be made that the British might have done more to combat the Famine, given the lack of logistical capability of the era. As a matter of fact, there are still logistical difficulties in addressing famine, despite the employment of air transport, let alone based upon sail and steam locomotives.< < Nonsense! The potato blight crossed the Irish sea to Western Scotland, hitting people who were as dependant(if not more so in the Hebrides) as some in Ireland on the tottie for the staple of their diet. Previously I thought that the deaths in Scotland were in double figures, however as coincidence would have it I was watching a recorded docu from Neil Oliver's 'History of Scotland' earlier, he reckons that deaths were in fact in the hundreds. He cites the differences between Ireland and Scotland's(which echo my own previous claims on here) situation was that people across Britain actually cared about Scots dying. Monies were raised, public opinion forced Lairds, lords and landlords to help out. Logistics phewwwwww! >>But to confuse incompetence with malice is equally invalid, despite more recent success in blaming the political for natural disasters.<< I'm sure anyone familiar with some of the quotes of Lord Trevelyan Britains man in Ireland would thoroughly disagree with you Dread. At best it was commission by ommission, though I reckon it(the famine) was viewed by the British Governer as mana from heaven. Good God if the guy who should have been facilitating aid was denying the existance of the famine at the same time as crowing of it's expediancy. What chance did the people have?

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Prince Eugen: “The potato blight crossed the Irish sea to Western Scotland, hitting people who were as dependant(if not more so in the Hebrides) as some in Ireland on the tottie for the staple of their diet. Previously I thought that the deaths in Scotland were in double figures, however as coincidence would have it I was watching a recorded docu from Neil Oliver’s ‘History of Scotland’ earlier, he reckons that deaths were in fact in the hundreds. He cites the differences between Ireland and Scotland’s(which echo my own previous claims on here) situation was that people across Britain actually cared about Scots dying. Monies were raised, public opinion forced Lairds, lords and landlords to help out. Logistics phewwwwww!”

    A great amount of noise signifying nothing, Eugen.

    The blight made initial landfall in SW England, being carried by wind to Ireland.

    The famine, being a biological culprit, was beyond the science of the era to address, the use of fungicides in farming being a twentieth century phenomenon — germ theory doesn’t rear its head until at least a decade after the blight.

    Now, I did acknowledge there were pre-existing laws regulating Irish agriculture, but these were more a matter of protectionist economic policy than some bloody-minded desire to cull the Irish. These were, in fact, at least temporarily lifted under Peel, who at least had a partial understanding of Ireland. Subsequent, more ignorant, administrations decreed that relief be paid for out of the rates, which led land-lords to limit the head-count on their land, so as to reduce their rates payment, creating a negative feed-back loop == more folks in need of aid against a fairly static rates payment.

    Likewise, while English policies were a hindrance to relief, I am not sure that the logistical ability for the British Empire to overcome the logistical challenges involved. The blight itself was brought to England through cross-Atlantic transshipment.

  • Prionsa Eoghann

    In amongst all that straw Dread you seek to excuse Britain because of the prevailing laissez-faire economic attitudes of the day. Whilst this may have been part of the problem, it was the lack of solution that concern us here.

    >>Likewise, while English policies were a hindrance to relief, I am not sure that the logistical ability for the British Empire to overcome the logistical challenges involved. The blight itself was brought to England through cross-Atlantic transshipment.< < Gott in himmell! Those Scottishers must have been logistical genuises, considering all of the islands and nooks and crannies unreachable by road that their famine relief had to get to. >>A great amount of noise signifying nothing, Eugen.<< A bit lazy to dismiss a direct comparison that exposes your waffle for what it was, discredit it all you like, best of luck but dismissal................shucks!

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Prince Eugen: “Gott in himmell! Those Scottishers must have been logistical genuises, considering all of the islands and nooks and crannies unreachable by road that their famine relief had to get to.”

    And what was the relative population density, Eugen? What was the relative density of railroads, etc. The English were working with at least marginally shorter logistical routes and were supporting less than half the number of people, Scotland (1841 population less than 3 million) v. Ireland (1841 population over 8 million) in roughly equal areas. Short form — Ireland, with less in the way of port capacity and railroads, would require more to be done with far less in the way of infrastructure, at least at first blush.

  • Brian MacAodh

    It was the fault of the lazy Irish. The British government tried their best.

  • Prionsa Eoghann

    Brian

    Looks that way.

    Dread

    It is ok to be graceful instead of flapping around advertising your distress.

    Incredibly, you are attempting to posit the argument that Ireland was somehow harder to reach than the hundreds of nooks and crannies that dot the west of Scotland. Scores of islands, glens that had no roads to speak of etc etc. Absolute and utter bolloks.

    The difference was that in Scotland alone the equivilant of 15 million quid(in today’s money) was raised. The local elites eventually put their efforts into getting this aid to the people. In contrast, Ireland has the British Governor pontificating on how the lower population will be easier to bend to his reforms. Oh and eventually allowing in corn as aid, an alien food that people did not even know how to cook.

  • igor

    Strange that when there were famines in Europe throughout the 14th 15th and 16th Centuries (but not in Ireland) the Brits didn’t get any of the credit. But when there was one in Ireland in the 1800’s it was all the fault of wicked Whigs and their Corn Laws. It couldn’t have been partly the responsibility of the Irish. Oh no. It was demuns what dun it to us

  • LURIG

    A right Loyalist wankfest on Slugger tonight and more so than usual. Have you all just come in from the Kremlin? Christmas party nights?

  • Observer

    “Sounds to me that you might be on a guilt trip. In fairness to Igor he never mentioned the IRA. He spoke about representatives of organisations (plural!) getting into government. Seems a fairly reasonable statement to me.”

    Obviously the reference by the imposter was to Jeffrey and the other ex British forces representatives at Stormont.

    “The blight made initial landfall in SW England, being carried by wind to Ireland.”

    How many millions died in England, Dread?

    The British could put large armies in the field in Ireland, could supply provisions for their navy and look after the ruling classes, civil service establishment and the preffered groups without too much difficulty. Hell, they could even feed the heathen Scots (no offense Prionsa) but the natives were another story.
    Why do you reject out of hand the idea that Britain might have been a teensy weeny bit unconcerned about mass starvation in the neighbouring island?
    Is it just unthinkable?

  • Prionsa Eoghann

    Obs

    >>Hell, they could even feed the heathen Scots (no offense Prionsa) but the natives were another story.<< Offence taken! Ye canny talk aboot the auldest nation in Christendom like that! We had Ninian and Pat long before Columcille fled from yir pagan backwater.