Another Fermanagh Sinn Féin Councillor resigns

According to the BBC report, a Fermanagh Sinn Féin Councillor has defected to the Socialist Party, and resigned from the council.

Domhnall O Cobhthaigh is the third fourth Sinn Fein member of Fermanagh District Council to leave the party in the space of two years. He was co-opted to fill the seat left by Poilin Ui Cathain who quit in March 2007 over Sinn Fein’s decision to support the police.

Adds From the updated BBC report

[Domhnall O Cobhthaigh] described his decision to leave Sinn Fein as “very difficult” given the “many friends” he was leaving behind in Sinn Fein. However, he said that the current economic crisis had brought difficulties to the party because of the “contradiction between the nationalist and socialist agendas within Sinn Fein”. He said the party was following policies of cuts and privatisation which would only cement sectarianism.

And thanks to Paddy M in the comments zone, the statement in full at the Socialist Party website

[Domhnall O Cobhthaigh] added “Over the past year, I have come to understand that the Assembly system itself only reinforces the sectarian divisions within our society. “All five mainstream parties are doing little more than overseeing the long-term administration of senior civil servants and their right-wing agenda. “While I still have respect for many of my former colleagues within Sinn Fein, I cannot see how they will change this significantly in the context of the current framework of governance.”

And From the statement at the Socialist Party website

“I have decided to resign from Sinn Fein after a period of careful reflection. Over the past twelve years I have worked tirelessly to develop Sinn Féin as an engine of change. Leaving is a very difficult decision given the many friends I am leaving behind in the party.

“I consider that the current economic crisis has brought to antagonism the contradiction between the nationalist and socialist agendas within Sinn Féin. I have struggled for many years to promote the agenda of community empowerment and opposition to neo-liberal economics but realise that I cannot now usefully continue that within Sinn Féin. As a result I have decided to resign my party membership.”

Adds A reminder of where the party was in July.

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  • Jonrus

    Would it not be better to have someone who knows about the party and their politics write/blog about this rather than someone who just re-posts the BBC news?

    We can all check this out for ourselves and anyone with an interest in politics already has seen it. Pete’s eagerness to stick the boot in prevents anyone else having a shot at writing something a bit more challenging about it.

  • Coll Ciotach

    I wonder why he did not go to Eirigi – I believe they are getting stronger in Fermanagh, seems like SF is starting to fray around the edges which is to be expected I suppose considering the massive growth you would expect a certain amount of retrenchment – but do all the latest resignations indicate a little more than that.

    More cheer to FF in a otherwise bleak time for them as there is boound to be room for them there too.

  • Not surprised another Shinner has left……the proof is they’ve become more right than left in recent years……

  • borderline

    The incessant rain eases off, the clouds begin to part, and a dreary steeple comes into view…

  • DC

    “are doing little more than overseeing the long-term administration of senior civil servants and their right-wing agenda”

    You could apply that to both British and Irish governments over countless decades.

    The only leader who put the civil service in its place and drove the conservative generals and government into radical plans was a certain Austrian, who I think we’ve all heard of.

  • Slugger O’Toole Admin

    Why, every time we have a post on Sinn Fein, some of our posters go into idiocy mode?

    Domhnall is another example of the kind of talent the party can ill afford to lose.

    I cannot say I knew him well, he spoke a panel I chaired in Fermanagh a few years back.

    I’m not in a position to speak to the precise circumstances surrounding his resignation, but the kind of ‘why didn’t he…” nonsense does not speak to what he’s reportedly said above, which is as sound an analysis of the current deadlock as any I have read.

    Whether senior servants have a right wing agenda or not is a matter of political perspective. But the absence of politicians who can give government direction, their natural instincts will always be keep things as they are.

    “I cannot see how they will change this significantly in the context of the current framework of governance.”

    Who here will argue that he’s wrong?

  • I was amused that someone who joined that party in 1997 was complaining about the institutions supporting sectarianism. If it weren’t so serious, I’d be rolling on the floor laughing.

  • YelloSmurf

    I agree with him that the Assembly system currently entrenches secterianism, and needs over-hauled. SF are definatly not Socialist anymore. They are signed up to the DUP’s finance programe, which is decidedly centre right (dispite the fact the DUP used to be known as centre left).

  • Cllr Domhnall O Cobhthaigh resigns from Sinn Fein to join the Socialist Party

    Sinn Fein councillor Domhnall O Cobhthaigh today announced his resiganation from the party at a press conference in order to join the Socialist Party to “build a cross-community opposition to the right-wing economic policies of the Assembly Executive”.

    Fermanagh Cllr Domhnall O Cobhthaigh who has served on Fermanagh District Council for the past two years claimed he could no longer remain in Sinn Fein as it was now part of an Assembly Executive which is “implementing cuts, job losses and privatising public services”.

    Joe Higgins, Socialist Party MEP for Dublin welcomed Mr O Cobhthaigh’s decision to join the Socialist Party today in Belfast

  • GGN

    What perpexes me somewhat is how someone can be a member of a party seeking to establish a unified and independent Irish Republic to join one which has a neo-Unionist outlook.

    I have said it before and I’ll say it again, the centre left is where a nationalist movement needs to be, al the SNP, rather at the mercy of the hard left.

    I do not see that the hard left has the discipline for it.

    As a nationalist, I would seek to unite all classes and poilitical outlooks around the idea of independence, others clearly disagree.

  • shorty

    Let me get this right. SF want to co-opt someone in place of this councillor who has resigned, and who himself was previously co-opted in place of another councillor who also had resigned.

    A this is from a party which preaches democracy, openness, transparency, accountabilty, etc, etc, to everyone else?

  • DC

    So, the penny drops that the NI Assembly is pretty much populated with Conservative Christian Democrats, and that’s being nice to the more right-wing fascist elements knocking about.

    Perhaps when or if the Labour party sets up here a real alternative might arise with success dependent upon how it is actually constituted i.e. with people of sensible leftist thought and determination.

    The government machine always pulls to the right, that’s why it’s important to come in as centre-left as you will leave government in a centre-right fashion, just look at the Tories when they left after coming in on the right.

    You need a bit of social compassion to act as a counter-weight to the rightist pull of government, and SF’s history in Northern Ireland has been devoid of any discernable compassion, as far as I’m concerned. Sociopaths as other commenters have described our political lot on Slugger before, I’d say more neurotic.

    If there has been any compassion, it’s been a false compassion of a neuropolitik sort.

  • michael

    “Why, every time we have a post on Sinn Fein, some of our posters go into idiocy mode?”

    Because it’s fun? 😉

    In a slightly related vein.
    I’ve been reading this site for a month or two, and posts like this leave me bewildered as to slugger’s USP.

    It’s essentially a slightly edited rss feed, with no analysis or comment by the ‘blogger’, I don’t personally consider strike out text and the words semi-detached polit bureau as comment, but hey, maybe that’s just me.

    It feels more like a regular forum with horrible navigation, external javascript references that block page loading (Boooooo!!!) and all without the freedom that a forum affords it’s readers to start conversations on things more pertinant than the wording on death notices.

    But perhaps I’m just not the target demographic.

  • Slugger O’Toole Admin

    GGN:

    “…a neo-Unionist outlook”.

    Er, really?

  • fair_deal

    CC

    “I believe they are getting stronger in Fermanagh”

    They didn’t have a good turnout for their fermanagh protest in august.

  • Mick,

    GGN is referring to the SP’s position of wanting a socialist federation of these islands. I think it is fair to say it is a big change for someone to leave a nationalist party for one with this aim.

  • Only Asking

    I do not see that the hard left has the discipline for it.

    As a nationalist, I would seek to unite all classes and poilitical outlooks around the idea of independence, others clearly disagree.

    You ought to join the SDLP then.

    At least the socialist party knows what the left entails and who its for and who it is against, SF haven’t worked that out yet, they make their policies up as they go along.

  • browser

    Spotted the following comment on p.ie It would appear that the former SF cllr has managed to raise the ire of some of his many erstwhile ‘friends’:-

    “A little birdie tells me that “revolutionary socialist” Dónal felt that the time required to be a cllr was cutting into his paid work commitments for a certain super-rich business family who’s name starts with Q.!!!!. Seems his loyalty is to the “half-crown”, and his “revolutionary socialism” only cosmetic as the SP will no doubt eventually discover.”

  • west belfast

    Didnt the Shinners poll around 34% in F&ST; at the Euro election? Hardly a party in melt down!

    I wish some one would blog about the inner turmoil in other parties – the DUP for example who are clearly three distinct groups.

  • shorty

    Didnt the Shinners poll around 34% in F&ST; at the Euro election?

    Down from 36%in 07 and 38%in 05. Does this indicate a trend?

  • Socialist

    For the record, just though I’d put this up to show people what the Socialist Party actually has to say about their position. I think it’s important people read what they have to say on their position rather than basing their views on misinterpretations, deliberte or otherwise.

    Peace process

    Build a real peace process based on uniting the working class communities, not on bringing discredited politicians together.

    Joint trade union and community action to counter all forms of sectarianism.

    An end to all activity by all paramilitaries, loyalist and republican.

    Complete demilitarisation – establish genuine policing services that are locally based and under the control of democratically elected policing committees.

    The conflict cannot be resolved on a capitalist basis – for the building of a mass political party capable of uniting the working class in the struggle for a socialist solution.

    For a socialist Ireland as part of a free and voluntary socialist federation of Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales.

  • Drumlins Rock

    how do you get the F&ST; poll figures for the Euros btw?

    The Euros were also a very low poll even in FST moany would blame that on the expenses scandal, which certainly had an impact on the unionist side but its debatable if it was as significant with republicans, ie. many of the unionist voters will turn out again next time, but will SFs?

    Setting aside local issues I think a issue is starting to emerge throughout Irish Politics, and that is Socialism and Nationalism are not easily campatible.

  • Gringo

    Socialist,

    Why do you think that Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales form some type of natural unit.

    Secondily you say:


    Build a real peace process based on uniting the working class communities, not on bringing discredited politicians together

    What does that mean? Where are the specifcs. How do you do that? Its the same as saying make everything better by having everything just great.

    Does their position get more specific than what you list above. No is the answer.

    Saying everything would be great if there was a Socialist paradise is not a policy. Its a promise.

    Can any socialist party person elaborate on how to unite the communities with some proper suggestions, not just if we all liked each other it would be fine stuff.

  • borderline

    Socialism and the working classes; ok a certain amount of it existed in a few Irish cities up until the early 70s but that was the height of it comrades, and it’s all over.

    So Joe Higgins can go back to his Kerry mountain, and cry that he wasn’t born into a Manchester slum 100 years ago.

  • Socialist

    Nobody is claiming that Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales is “form some type of natural unit”.

    You should read what the Socialist Party’s position actually is.

    You can read the Socialist Party’s very detailed and specific analysis and proposals at: http://geocities.com/socialistparty/Publications/TTContents.htm

    and here: http://spni.032.org.uk/Website/Online Publications/Towards Division/Intro TDNP.html

    The Socialist Party point to the concrete stuggles of working class people, such as the classroom assistants strike, the Visteon occupation, anti-water charges We Won’t Pay Campaign etc, as examples of how sectarian division can be cut across, which the parties in Stormont are incapable of doing.

    You seem to forget the massive demonstrations and strikes taken by workers, Catholic and Protestant, against death threats and sectarian killings by loyalist and republican paramilitaries down the years which played a crucial role in leading to the “peace process” which has been left in the hands of sectarian parties and right-wing governments. The Socialist Party argue that the potential to build a genuine peace process, by uniting working class communities in class struggle and the fight for socialism can develop. They would claim that working class people across the sectarian divide in the North have more in common than they have with Gerry Adams or Peter Robinson.

  • joeCanuck

    working class people across the sectarian divide in the North have more in common than they have with Gerry Adams or Peter Robinson.

    Alas, such has always been the case; but sectarianism trumps all.

  • gringo

    The Socialist Party argue that the potential to build a genuine peace process, by uniting working class communities in class struggle and the fight for socialism can develop. They would claim that working class people across the sectarian divide in the North have more in common than they have with Gerry Adams or Peter Robinson.

    Gerry and Peter may argue, and very validly, that judging by the level of support the Socialists enjoy across the nation and what , if anything, the socialist party has achieved that common people also have very little in common with the Socialist party.

    Now the SP can argue against that but does that change the basic kernel of truth there.

    Telling everyone you are of the people does not make it so,

  • Ray

    Expect Gerry Adams to stand down from Parliament next year.

  • underwood

    This guy Domhnall O Cobhthaigh actually sounds like he is a genuine republican. If I’m right about that, I wish him well.

  • The Raven

    I’m with underwood on that.

  • Comrade Stalin

    All that bollocks about socialism died when the Berlin Wall came down.

    It is, quite frankly, capitalism and money which consolidates peace – war is bad for business. The poor performance of the NI economy in the mid/late C20th sustained and fuelled the troubles, and it is the improvement within that economy which has helped to bring them to an end.

  • Raven and Underwood,

    You think he was in the Provos for the past 12 years and never realised they were interested in sectarian politics?

  • Mark McGreg

    I think the socialist party with its sectarian bun fight against the SWP is a perfect home for a ex-shinner that just a few months ago was ‘spying’ on éirígí members as they protested in Enniskillen.

    Its always good to see anyone get to the stage they see through the lies SF tell themselves, members and the electorate. It is sad that he got to this stage after acting in such a way he no longer had the option of joining a republican party.

  • Mark McGreg

    Gari,

    btw, my old email address is rubber ducked, you can get the temp one I’m using off this post. I will get back to you about the other thing but I’m snowed under.

  • jim p

    We are bitter aren’t we Mark.Just because you’re a failed Shinner who had it in for The Worker’s Solidarity Movement.

  • Mark McGreg

    jim p,

    Is there any other sort of shinner than failed? ;0)

    I certainly don’t think I ever ‘had it in’ for the WSM especially given I’m the only person that mentioned them or their stuff on Slugger (once slightly negative and twice covering their events) and even tried to assist one of their members getting a voice here.

    I’m certainly not going to ignore the sectarianism of the SP and SWP after seeing first hand their pathetic splitting of anti-bush protests, the anti-war movement, anti-racism campaigns, anti-water charges and the list goes on and on and on.

    Now funnily enough the WSM always seem to side with the SP on this stuff so I’m not surprised you as a seeming WSM supporter raise them when leaping to the defence of the SP after their sectionalism is raised.

  • Could anyone confirm whether this means SF do not want to see devolution of fiscal matters (schedules 2/3 of NI Act 1998)? Is any party calling for this?

  • Cheers Mark. No hurry.

    On the topic itself, this is a surprising move. Both that a northern PSFer would join them, and that they would seek to take him so openly, given that if you read his statement carefully, he doesn’t really repudiate a lot of the things with which the SP disagrees in his former party’s platform.

  • Framer

    From one democratic centralist conspiracy to another albeit non-nationalist.

  • borderline

    I think this thread is rather good; we’re starting to understand the hijacking that extreme nationalism did of republicanism.

    Irish, and Northern Irish, socialism is caught in the crosswires of this cock-up.

    Expect soon a massive realization in green ranks.

    You can be an ordinary guy, Irish as let be, and follow Hearts.

  • irrationallyangry

    Garibaldy:

    O’Cobhthaigh has long described himself as a socialist and, if I recall correctly, a Marxist. His statement seems pretty clear that he now thinks that SF and the other major Stormont parties are reinforcing sectarianism rather than eroding it and that he is strongly opposed to the right wing policies SF and the other main parties have been implementing at Stormont.

    SF has always had a socially radical component within it. And just as the hardline nationalist elements of the party have difficulty swallowing things like Police Boards, the socially radical types have difficulty swallowing the business as usual politics of Stormont.

    There is also the issue that SF, as it replaces the SDLP as the main Catholic party, has also taken on the SDLP’s role as defenders of Catholic communal interests. That again doesn’t sit well with the socially radical types.

    Where else is someone like that going to go? The Socialist Party are very small, but they are probably the most visible and active group promoting cross community socialist politics. And their recent electoral success in the South gives them a small amount of additional credibility.

  • DC

    The Socialist Party were handing out stereotypical left-wing nonsense at Botanic train station a little while back to do with bankers etc, it was nonsense if i remember correctly tbf.

    Now I’m all for the application of a style of government that betters everyone even on the fly or sly but the Socialist Party is nowhere near as professional enough to wipe the eye of capitalists.

    Just ain’t sophisticated enough to mix it in good ole take from the rich and give to the poorer fashion. In today’s world it is essential to make people, as Bill Clinton said, swallow a shit and still smile.

    That’s why Blair was such a big disappointment, he could’ve done better at just that. Wasted opportunity.

  • He said that the Assembly system itself reinforces sectarianism. Which is a long way away from saying that the parties within it do not promote sectarianism by other means. Which as I understand it is the position of the SP.

    And from its inception the Provisional movement has claimed to be the real defenders of the Catholic community. I find the idea that someone could be in them for 12 years, rise to the rank of a councillor, and not realise this literally incredible. We’re not talking about some teenager here who joined believing the leftist rhetoric only to be rapidly disillusioned, like say the students in Galway who made the same move.

    He had other options. Other people in his situation have gone to groups like éigígí and the CPI. You are welcome to think that the SP are probably the most visible and active group promoting cross community socialist politics. I am welcome to think that is bombastic. We can agree to respectfully disagree.

    I’m not saying that the SP shouldn’t have taken him, or that he shouldn’t have joined them. I’m only saying that I find it a strange choice in a northern context. No more and no less.

  • Socialist

    “Garibaldy” – He said that the Assembly system itself reinforces sectarianism. Which is a long way away from saying that the parties within it do not promote sectarianism by other means. Which as I understand is the position of the SP.

    The Socialist Party has said on many occasions that both the sectarian parties and the Assembly system reinforces sectarianism. It has been a constant element in the analysis of the Socialist Party.

    Garibaldy seems to be a very easily moved individual. He does not seem to know what he is actually talking about. The ex-SF councillor stated already that he has not come to his decision overnight but over quite a period of time. I personally think it must be a difficult decision to reject a strategy and political allegiance which someone has spent years working on, which may have even entailed even more political hard work then Garibaldy has been involved in, and join a new political party which has consistently opposed Sinn Fein’s right wing nationalism.

    Maybe you should explain why ANYBODY should join the Communist Party. Tell me what they do, please. Do you think the CP registers in any way with workers? At least the Socialist Party play a very actove role in assisting workers like the NCP workers, Visteon, and Nortel.

    I also have to say the Socialist Party did play an impressive role in building the We Wont Pay Campaign against water charges.

  • gringo

    You are welcome to think that the SP are probably the most visible and active group promoting cross community socialist politics. I am welcome to think that is bombastic.

    Bombastic would be an understatement. Never has one party donned a mantle of self praise more than the Socialist Party and delivered nothing in return.

    Any Socialist feels aggrieved by that comment are humbly invited to prove me wrong and tell me lasting change in society the Socialists have contributed.

    I await the results of over 30 years of existence. Any results actually.

  • Socialist,

    You clearly do not understand the sentence I wrote that you quote. I am saying that the SP argues that sectarianism stretches beyond the Assembly system. This statement from the ex-councillor refers merely to the Assembly system. There is no explicit suggestion in the statement that PSF is itself a sectarian party. I wonder why not.

    The phrase used in the statement put up on the SP was a period of careful reflection. Am I supposed to be know how long that period was? It could be anything from an hour to a decade or more, but he was only co-opted to the seat in 2007, suggesting that it is fairly recent.

    I’ll treat your remark about how much political activity I may or may not have been involved in with the contempt it deserves, and not give it credibility by ennumerating what I have or haven’t done. A rather poor attempt at a jibe and a smokescreen.

    You say I do not seem to know what I am talking about. Yet you seem unable to read what I have actually said. I did not say he, or anyone else, should have joined the CP. I simply said that that is what others in his situation have done.

    If you want to get polemical on my ass, at least be sure you have actually understood what I wrote first, and then I won’t have to repeat myself and you won’t show yourself up as someone who is incapable of thinking about what has been said before responding to it with a pre-programmed line.

  • The Raven

    “You think he was in the Provos for the past 12 years and never realised they were interested in sectarian politics?”

    Nah, Gari. I was just have a moment of naive sentimentality for what passed – for me – as reasonably heartfelt and considered words. It almost aped principle – something which is sadly lacking in elected reps of all arts and parts. 🙂

  • Socialist

    Domhnall O Cobhthaigh has stated that the right-wing economic policies of the parties in the Assembly Executive and their sectarian agendas have both contributed to sectarian division.

    He stated this on BBC Ulster today. This is a recognition of the sectarian character of Sinn Fein.

    He also stated on radio taday that he had not come to the decision to leave Sinn Fein lightly or recently. He explained he has given a lot of time and consideration in arriving to his decision to leave Sinn Fein.

    He has spent more than two years as a councillor. Are you seriously suggesting that people cannot draw political conclusions in less than two years?

    You need to explain your reference to the Communist Party. Why did you raise this party? Which former Sinn Fein councillor has joined the Communist party?

  • Socialist

    Gringo,

    Do you actually believe that the scrapping of water charges in the South was insignificant? Do you think it is irrelevant that hundreds of thousands of households in the South have saved thousands as a result of the non-payment campaigns success, which the Socalist Party played the leading role in?

    Or what about the GAMA workers, who have publically stated that if it were not for the role of the Socialist Party they would still be working in slave –labour conditions and would not have received the wages which were illegally kept by the company?

    Or what about the home-help workers who saw major improvements in pay and conditions as a result of the initiative of the Socialist Party to help organise these workers?

    Or what about the migrant workers who secured unpaid wages from a major exhaust company in Enniskillen after the Socialist Party represented them?

    Do you really believe the We Won’t Pay Campaign, which was led by the Socialist Party played no role in forcing the abandonment of water charges?

    If so, I would be extremely interested in hearing how you have achieved tanglible benefits for working class people. Or would you like to defend the right-wing agenda of the parties in the Assembly Executive?

  • Ice Pick

    The Socialist Party were in the past controlled by a British based leadership in the days of Militant. Militant were amongst the most anti-Provo section of the British left and were even at one point promoting the PUP, even though the UVF killed one of their supporters.

    The Socialist Party may have broken from much of that nonsense and established their independence but still it’s an odd choice for Domhnall O Cobhthaigh.

  • irrationallyangry

    Garibaldy:

    You seem to be reaching conclusions about what the man thinks based on what isn’t in his brief statement rather than what is in his statement. With all due respect, that’s a nonsensical approach. He has already been in the media adding more detail to his decision to leave Sinn Fein.

    You can listen to one of his interviews on the UTV site. In it he makes it clear that he thinks that all of the mainstream parties have adopted a common right wing economic policy. He goes on to say that they differentiate themselves by bickering around the politics of identity in a manner that causes further division. Presumably that’s clear enough for you?

    Given that this is now his view, Eirigi was hardly a viable option for him. He talked throughout his interview about building a cross-community socialist alternative, and whatever else they may or may not achieve Eirigi are not going to do that. So what does that leave him realistically? He could become an independent activist, but that’s setting your horizons very low. What organisation out there is trying to achieve the goals he talks about apart from the Socialist Party?

    Far from being bombastic, I was very clear that the SP is a small organisation, particularly in the North. But it is younger, more visible and more dynamic outfit than the slowly dying likes of the CP or the Workers Party.

  • Gringo

    the temporary scrapping of water charges is radical beyond belief. Such change in Ireland has we never hoped for.

    So yes frankly I do think the scrapping of water charges, on a temporary basis only, is insignificant. That is not radical change by any stretch of imagination.

    The Gama workers- yet every day there are more and more workers whose working conditions are being pushed down. Gama is over! Where is the lasting change. There is no lasting change achieved. A temporary victory again. In no way has the SP created a situation where GAMA styke exploitation cannot happen again. Another temporary victory.

    Home help, am interested but sceptical about the SPs role in delivering any actual change through your own efforts. open to persuasion.

    Migrant workers – the SP achieves another singular victory without actually changing society. Actually saw very little about this in connection with the SP.

    Water Charges – as I noted the type of radical change we longed for.

    Have I achived radical change? no I have not!. But then I never dressed up minor achievements and ran around beatin my chest telling everyone that I was the worker’s champion which is what the SP do.

    Not one of those things you mention above are of any use to creating radical change in Ireland. They are minor inconveniences to right wing parties. Where is the legislative programme to thwart these things occurring in future. Still pending is it?

    I am no friend of right wing parties but neither do I believe the SP when it shouts so loudly about its radical vision but creates no real change save a few minor and temporary bumps to bother those self-same right wing parties.

    I support what the Socialist Party wants to achieve. I just think they are singularly useless in achieving it.

  • Socialist,

    There have been people who’ve left PSF for the CP in the past. Hence why I mentioned them. I was just making the point that there were other choices available. No more, no less.

    Angry,

    If you believe that the SP is the most visible and most dynamic socialist organisation in NI then you are welcome to that opinion. Like I said we can agree to disagree. Similarly if you believe it is the only organisation seeking to build a left alternative in NI.

  • fair_deal

    Mark

    “was ‘spying’ on éirígí members as they protested in Enniskillen”

    Was he spying or was he shopping around for somewhere to go and decided to see how their protest went?

  • shorty

    irrationallyangry – “Eirigi was hardly a viable option for him.”

    Given that he openly and publicly supported the PSNI, remained silent about the use of the SRR in Fermanagh and having acted as chair of Fermanagh’s District Policing Partnership (where he remained silent about the use of prolonged detentions), I’d say that Domhnall twigged on that Eirigi wouldn’t exactly have welcomed him with open arms….

  • Lefty

    Video of Peter Hadden discussing the signing of the St. Andrews Agreement in 2006.

  • Reader

    shorty: Given that he openly and publicly…
    Sheesh. There’s tough rules. In which case I take it that there is no chance of them ever, ever, taking on an ex-unionist?