Commentariat versus the Bloggertariat: who’s winning?

I’m off to the London offices of Edelman to join a panel debate with David Aaronovitch, Iain Dale and Martin Bright at 6… on who’s winning… My provisional answer to the question is the technology, and even newer generation technologies like Twitter are throwing up their own challenges to the bloggers… I’ll write up the details later…

Adds: Martin’s got his own preliminary thoughts up at his Spectator blog… It’s being Twittered here… I may even Twitter as the debate continues… And the #tag was #eiblogger

  • otto

    Just went to have a look at the Tribune site to see what, if any, conversation was had with the readership about their disclosure case.

    No comments at all (you’d think there’d be congratulations at least) which makes the site feel a bit of a ghost town.

    I know this isn’t remotely fair but compared to something as interactive as Slugger traditional reporting seems a bit hit and run with a journalist just downloading their opinion and disappearing off into the next week’s workload.

    What I’d like to see is more columnists turning up personally on Slugger from time to time so that they can join in conversations – especially if a thread references one of their columns.

    The only journalist I remember seeing here is Eamonn McCann and he only came along to yell at someone.

  • Pete Baker

    “he only came along to yell at someone.”

    Yeah, otto.

    Me. :o)

    Jim Fitzpatrick has dropped by too, though. And Malachi’s a regular.

    Mick

    I didn’t realise it was a competition. ;op

  • jone

    As John Naughton notes Nick Robinson has stopped reading the comments on his blog as they’re so often “rude, intemperate and unthinking.”

    http://memex.naughtons.org/archives/2009/06/16/8060

    And I guess for many writers that’s the rub. Look at CiF – would many people to plunge into a discussion there after reading 200 posts of invective?

    There’s also the time element, especially for broadcasters – it’s not particularly practical to engage on the blog when there’s other things they need to be doing.

    If you look at someone like Phil McNulty on BBC Sport he clearly takes the time to read the comments on his blog and get involved in the discussion but that’s probably because he’s web-only and doesn’t have to worry about servicing TV and Radio.

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  • Mick Fealty

    jone, quite…

    You can navigate back through the tweets of the session: #eiblogger

  • otto

    “As John Naughton notes Nick Robinson has stopped reading the comments on his blog as they’re so often “rude, intemperate and unthinking.””

    Is the problem is that we haven’t worked out whether sites like Slugger should feel like invitation only seminars, well mannered town hall meetings or Speaker’s Corner free-for-alls?

    The ‘papers clearly think that their comments sections have some commercial value; whether that’s attracting people to view on line advertising, getting content for the print version’s letter page or just providing a bit more engagement for regular readers.

    I’d urge them to recognize that a well moderated site, perhaps requiring (if Mick keeps it up) registration like Slugger, which channels people to newspaper sites through the links, can do all those things better than the individual papers themselves.

    Maybe what Slugger really is is a voluntarist NI-wide residents’ association. Nobody elected any of us commenting people but we get to come along and whinge/cajole/praise/be disgusted anyway.

  • kensei

    If you look at someone like Phil McNulty on BBC Sport he clearly takes the time to read the comments on his blog and get involved in the discussion but that’s probably because he’s web-only and doesn’t have to worry about servicing TV and Radio.

    Some other mainstream blogger, particularly on the BBC, will address some questions on the top levela fter a period. I think this is the most appropriate, both in terms of professionalisma nd being actuall;y able to deal with a debate that’s hundreds of comments long with umpteenth different threads going at once.

  • kensei

    Also – this site doesn’t have registration? You never have to log in, user profiles aren’t stored anywhere and I can supply any name and email like foo@foo.foo. Asking for an email is not the same thing, and trivially worked around.