Stad.

An annoymus householder who owns a holiday home in the gaeltacht has complained about stop signs in Irish. Although Donegal county council says the signs are not a high risk threat, they are going to change them to read stop in English, to the huge annoyance of the locals.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    It’s nowhere near me, but I suppose they want this all-Ireland thingy, so they’ll keep on tellin me about people who’ve got the similar problems to myself.

  • missfitz

    Before anyone else says anything, the county is spelled with one ‘l’, as opposed to the Belfast family Donegall.

  • Mack

    Well it is in Ulster, you know, your homeland.

    Can’t be that far away, surely?

  • Modernist

    If it said arrete in france would a german person moan. Its pretty obvious what a red hexagonal sign at a junction means

  • William

    Surely it is the height of bad manners to only have the signs in Oirsh….the majority of visitors won’t understand Gaelic, so if the native speakers in the area wish to have signs in the supposed ‘first’ language of the state, perhaps they should consider also putting the second language on them, considering that the supposed second language is actually the first language, in terms of usage within the state.

  • Mack

    William it is the height of bad manners to use the term Oirish.

  • This reminds me of Quebec where stop signs say “Arret” but in France they say “Stop”…

    Too much time on your hands lads.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    “[i]Well it is in Ulster, you know, your homeland.

    Can’t be that far away, surely?2[/i]

    Posted by Mack

    Seamus Mac Breartaigh’s Ulster is not the same as my Ulster. He’s sided with the forces from Dublin.

  • Oilifear

    One anonymous caller? Who own a friggin’ holiday home? Great expense? What a load of rubbish! I’ve heard people complain about the expense of Irish-language signs, now we know about the expense of English-language signs!

    Although, “Stad” is a new one for me. I had always seen “Stop” signs in Gaeltachts. Modernist, they say “Stop” in France too – and most places I’ve been (see here). Quebec, I remember, was an exception. There they had “Arrêt”.

    Uladh do Shean Tír, spare a thought for your compatriots?

  • Ulsters my homeland

    what happens if ‘outsiders’ come to the area, how are they going to navigate properly at these junctions?… what if they happen to be liable, what about their insurance?

  • Oilifear

    “…the majority of visitors won’t understand Gaelic…”

    They will understand a big red hexagonal traffic sign at a T-junction, though.

    I suppose it depends on what you mean by bad manners. If you are the sort that expect others to speak your language when you visit a place, I suppose you would find it so. If you are the sort that appreciates the culture of the places you visit, I suppose you wouldn’t find it so.

    For those that just want safe roads, the big red hexagonal sign at a T-junction should do the trick.

  • Smee

    “Well it is in Ulster, you know, your homeland”

    “Seamus Mac Breartaigh’s Ulster is not the same as my Ulster. He’s sided with the forces from Dublin”

    Magic!! Looks like I’ll have to get the beers in for this one…

  • RepublicanStones

    ‘what happens if ‘outsiders’ come to the area’

    Strange, describing tourists or Sunday drivers as ‘outsiders’. I suppose you must sit on your porch, plucking your banjo watching for these ‘outsiders’.

  • Mack

    Ulster is my homeland –

    Seamus Mac Breartaigh’s Ulster is not the same as my Ulster. He’s sided with the forces from Dublin.

    Was unaware either of you had an Ulster – not a geographic entity then?

  • Greagoir O Frainclin

    It is very funny of you William to always use the term ‘Oirish’ in your posts. You sound as if you are a bit of a hoot and a good laugh.
    I bet you are the jovial prankster in the office or workplace. Go on, admit it 😉

    More please!

  • kensei

    Thing is, Stop signs are a distinctive shape, so that they can be recognised even if, for example, they are covered in snow. That noted, this should have been dismissed out of hand.

  • Plastic Paddy

    “Ulsters my homeland”

    i don’t even know where to begin . . . unbelievable.

    Are you seriously completely unaware that Donegal is part of Ulster – your “homeland”?

  • Smee

    Should he not be called two-thirds of Ulster’s My Homeland from now on?

  • William

    Naw….I once met a big Galway born Tarmacer in a ‘greasy spoon cafe’ in Reading….I couldn’t understand his thick brogue English, so after I managed to understand a little of his lingo, he said, ‘did’ye think I was talking Oirish’.

  • William

    Forgot to say I am not the funny one in my place of work….the High Court…we sometimes get names like Greagoir O Frainclin which are damned hard to understand…..our attempts at pronouncing them…now that’s funny!!!

  • Tony

    Multicultural Ireland…

    Why not multi-language signs?

  • Harry Flashman

    Yeah a pretty obvious red hexagonal sign bearing a four letter word beginning with ST- shouldn’t be too hard to work out, if it does confuse you then the best course of action would be to immediately slow down and when you come to the junction stop to make sure there is no other traffic coming and if not proceed on again.

    Non story.

  • edward

    in the franco-manitoba areas of my wee “pravince” the stop signs say Stop/arret.

    Bilingualism: it really isn’t that hard

  • Ri Na Deise

    Lovely. Its a sign of the ills of the modern world that peoples ignorance and stupidity is pandered to thus. Ye have a problem with Irish? Dont bother coming to Ireland so. Simple really.

  • OC

    I agree that the stop sign should have been left as is.

    But perhaps now some of the more obnoxious pro-ILA can understand the annoyance of non-Irish speakers in English speaking areas of NI when pressed to provide Irish language support where it won’t even be used.

  • OC

    ‘Uladh do Shean Tír’ – Ulster [] Ancient Land?

  • NCM

    The more fundamental problem is that every single one of you — Irish speakers and English speakers alike — drive on the wrong side of the road, making travel extremely hazardous no matter what your stop signs look like.

  • Cahal

    Having not a word of the Irish, and having just watched the clip, it is so obvious that the ‘stad’ sign is a ‘stop’ sign that I can only conclude the anonymous complaimer is the third Proclaimer.

  • Octagonal

    It’s an octagon

  • Road watcher

    NCM,

    Did you not hear that a bill is about to be introduced in the Dáil making in Law that all traffic drives on the right hand side of the road, just like the rest of the Europeans?

    I also heard that the Law is to be introduced in phases. Buses and Lorries first…

  • picador

    I hope the local gaelgeoiri cut down the first new sign to be erected. If that fails they should should shoot any councilors who supported the proposal. (Note: second proposal not serious)

  • Jimmy

    What kind of a Buck eijit would not understand the meaning of the Irish word Stad, at a Junction where one is ‘suppossed’ to Stop!!, then not be able to make the logical connection next time he sees the Sign,He must do it everyday, He cant forget-Confused what it means? does he have some kind of specific memory lapse at Stop-Stad Junctions?,maybe he shouldnt be driving? I think the fella that complained about the signs has too much time on his hands.

  • Ulster McNulty

    OC

    “English speaking areas of NI”

    I love these Irish / English / Ulster Scots threads, they quickly turn surreal.

    Although this one started out surreal – what kind of a plonker is so arrogant that they will refuse to learn that “Stad” = “Stop”, as any normal person would. I bet it was the same kind of person who dialled 999 to tell they cops they were stuck in a traffic jam and late for work, and could they use the hard shoulder. Has Linda Lusardi got a house in Donegal?

  • Ulster McNulty

    Road Watcher

    Superb!

  • edward

    Second point does anyone even read a stop sign? Isnt it more normal to identify the shape and colour and follow through with the international action of stopping at red octagon’s

    Has anyone ever seen one that says “go” in any language

  • KathleenAn annoymus householder …

    “Annoymous” ??

    I’m sure it’s a typo, but it’s a very appropriate one in the circumstancs.

    🙂

  • edward,

    Has anyone ever seen one that says “go” in any language

    Yes. The old-fashioned hand held signs used by road workers used to say ‘stop’ (in red) on one side, and ‘Go’ (in green) on the other. They would control the traffic by just rotating the sign in their hands. Nowadays we have automated traffic lights at roadworks, but they lack the chrm of the old days.

  • RG Cuan

    Most ‘Stop’ signs in the Gaeltacht areas actually read ‘Stop’. Both ‘stop’ and ‘stad’ can be used in Irish.

    I thought however that having ‘Stop’ on such signs was an international norm so drivers, wherever they are, know what to do. Of all the European countries i’ve driven in, i can’t remember any that uses their own language on stop signs.

  • missfitz

    I now know more about Stop signs than I had ever desired to do.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stop_sign

    If you scroll to the bottom of the article you can see Stop signs from a variety of countries. They are regulated by the Vienna Convention on Road Signs and Signals. It is permissable to use the ‘national language’ of a country on a Stop sign, but the preference is for a standardisation of the signs across the world.

  • edward

    Horseman

    But the red Side still says “stop”

  • edward,

    But the red Side still says “stop”

    Yes, but it is pointing in the direction of the traffic coming in the opposite direction. The two words are on either side of a single sign (like a lollypop man/woman’s sign), so at all times one direction is being told to stop, and the other is being told to go. It’s a simple system, but it worked.

  • Here’s a picture of a ‘go’ sign. I presume it is a ‘stop’ sign on its reverse but the damned laws of somethingorother mean we cannot see both sides of a flat surface simultaneously!

    http://www.freefoto.com/preview/21-55-52?ffid=21-55-52

  • Dewi
  • Rory Carr

    “What kind of a Buck eijit would not understand the meaning of the Irish word Stad…?” asks Jimmy, quite reasonably it would seem.

    Except of course that this geezer must surely have known that it was a ‘Stop!’ sign, otherwise how would he know to demand that it have the word ‘Stop!’ written thereon?

    “When in Rome….” we used to say, not that this silly duffer is likely to venture so far afield, at least not without demanding that all ‘Pizza’ signs be changed to ‘Flat bread discs smeared with tomato paste and topped with cheese, anchovies, olives and other delights according to taste!’.

    But hold! An anonymous holiday home owner who has difficulty with the Irish language did you say? Now I wonder who that could be?

  • Kathleen

    I’m sure it’s a typo, but it’s a very appropriate one in the circumstancs

    Whats this horseman a typo 😉

    Thats why I love you guys, when you play spot the mistake. I’m such an easy target.. 🙂

  • … when you play spot the mistake. I’m such an easy target.. 🙂

    Hey, it happens to us all, and I wasn’t getting at you per se. It was just that the typo ‘annoymous’ was so appropriate as a description of the type of annoying whinger who hides his identity!

    Does the Slugger Academy not offer you courses on grammar, punctuation and orthography? I thought you bloggers had to live up to higher standards than us mere annoymous commenters.

    😉

  • Billyo

    Why do they have a sign in the first place. Can those Irish donkeys read?

  • Trev

    Talking of road signs, what’s Irish for ‘Sniper At Work’?

  • Paul Kielty

    Surely this sad individual should be roundly condemned by all. What a twat!!
    It does not matter what part of these islands you move to, even just for the holidays, you must show respect for the locals.
    Reminds me of a story in Scotland some years ago when a retired couple, from the south of England, bought a house on the Ardmuchin penisula. They objected to the building of a secondary school in one of the villages on the basis that the noise generated in the construction of the school was spoiling their quiet retirement. The result was that the local children had to resume their bus trip across dangerous waters on a portaferry type craft, then the 15 miles or so up to Fortwilliam, in all the appalling weather associated with the western highlands. I think their complaint may have been upheld!!
    I think local authorities have a lot to answer for in both situation.

  • Conchúr

    ‘Snípéir Ag Obair’

  • Reader

    Ulster McNulty: Although this one started out surreal – what kind of a plonker is so arrogant that they will refuse to learn that “Stad” = “Stop”, as any normal person would.
    A tourist. I think the householder was more worried about someone else who couldn’t read the sign rather than worried about forgetting what it meant themselves.
    Mind you, having driven round rural areas, I’d be more worried about the local drivers anyway.

  • NCM

    ‘Snípéir Ag Obair’

    That’s an interesting traffic engineering question. Should “Sniper at Work” signs in NI have been in English, so British soldiers could read them, or in Irish, so the locals could read them?

  • Trev

    Why am I not surprised that a translation of ‘Sniper At Work’ was readily to hand to the Irish language lobby? Just shows the type of friends they keep I suppose.

  • Rory Carr

    Much I suppose, Trev, as I am not in the least surprised at the readiness to hand you have of the same rendering in the English language.

    Am I intended to believe that this says something of the type of friends that you keep?

  • Seimi

    ‘Why am I not surprised that a translation of ‘Sniper At Work’ was readily to hand to the Irish language lobby? Just shows the type of friends they keep I suppose.’ – Trev

    Ho-hum. A pefectly ordinary piece about a Stad sign in the Gaeltacht turns into a ‘Those Irish speakers, they’re all Provies ye know?’ piece of bullshit. Wonderful.

    Nice one Trev. Did the batteries fall out of your PSP?