St Pauls cancels ‘Crip’ function…

It looks the like St Paul’s GAC had been unaware just who and for their clubhouse was being booked. They’ve now cancelled it. Statement from the club below:

“The GAA is a sporting and cultural body and St Paul’s is very aware of its role within it and the wider community. Our club committee was not aware of the nature of this booking when it was made. The booking has now been cancelled and we can now hopefully return to our primary function of serving our local community with sporting and cultural opportunities.”

  • Democratic

    Fair play to them too – well done! – now one set of die-hards have lost a beating stick and the other set have gained one…..here we go again no doubt.

  • DK

    Well done them – but the INLA are probably not the kind of people you want to cross.

  • dantheman

    Bit of a no-brainer. It would have been an outrage to host this event. The GAA should investigate how it ever got this far…

  • RepublicanStones

    I’ll put the kettle on Democratic shall I?

  • Democratic

    Milk but no sugar RS – I’m sweet enough…
    I’m here all week etc, etc.

  • Dec

    Bit of a no-brainer. It would have been an outrage to host this event. The GAA should investigate how it ever got this far…

    Always more to do, eh Dan?

  • dantheman

    Dec,

    I am a proud GAA supporter and Down fan. But this is not the way to go

  • iluvni

    Good for them.
    Maybe the GAA as a whole will now review their position on honouring terrorists in their grounds and clubhouses.
    Its long past time they did.

  • dantheman

    “Good for them.
    Maybe the GAA as a whole will now review their position on honouring terrorists in their grounds and clubhouses.
    Its long past time they did.”

    Thanks for that. Maybe you’re right. What would you suggest? All positive contributions welcome.

  • lee

    ‘Maybe the GAA as a whole will now review their position on honouring terrorists in their grounds and clubhouses.’

    Hopefully the IFA will do likewise and issue guidelines about honouring terrorists at games and allowing their social clubs to be used by sectarian organisations.

  • Realist

    “Thanks for that. Maybe you’re right. What would you suggest? All positive contributions welcome”

    An amendment of Rule 8(a) from “The Association shall be non party political” to “The Association shall be non political” for starters?

    In the case of St Pauls GAC, perhaps they will discourage their Under 11 kids from participation in Hunger Strike Memorial competitions in future, unlike in 2006.

  • dantheman

    Realist,

    I’d agree with both of the above.

    Ireland today is very different from when these rules were introduced and they serve no purpose now.

    Like the IFA the GAA needs to change a few things. Both have made positive changes over the last few years.

    Whilst the GAA is already the biggest (and best run) sport in Ireland, north and south, it is far from flawless and any moves which can get more people involved in the sport should be welcomed.

    Naturally there are people in this world which would attack the GAA out of pure spite. It’s nice to hear from people who have an interest in Ireland’s greatest sport and can identify areas for potential improvement.

  • niall

    Mick, these GAA threads always end up the same?

    It’s the right thing to do.

    I really admire much about the GAA but it is often used and abused and indeed it’s structure makes it easy to use and abuse.

    I should say “membership” is a fluid thing. Some years i don’t be around when it’s being collected so i don’t pay. So sometimes i’m a member and sometimes i’m not and i imagine the club secretary would rarely consider which players have paid up. (unless there are intercounty tckts to be dished out).

    The huge number of clubs spread over areas with different social, economic, political ground mean that you will have a huge diversity in social, economic and political experiences – opinions etc. Thats common sense, right?

    What is shared is firstly and by far the most important thing for me, a love of the games for the sake of what they are, exhilerating, exciting, soul destroying and challenging.

    Th cultural stuff as always is impossible to qualify in my opinion. Some people love Scor and will Irish Language the head of you. Me I love the games, the friendships, the wins, the losses.

    Do some people use the GAA in the north? Absol bloody utely. I remember a Sinn Fein counsellor standing in our changing rooms after training circa 1998. I didn’t think it was right, i’m sure many there didn’t give a shit what the little bollox said but there he was, trying to hijack an organisation in our area which had done pretty well without them in the meantime.

    The GAA has a huge diversity of support from every background.

    Unionists making the arguments about gunmen and bombers being honoured etc should make some effort to understand that.

    If they want their position to get a fair hearing within the GAA they should be making an argument along the lines of “Don’t let yourselves be used” as opposed to “your association is this, is that, is the other”.

    I say this because the biggest sporting association on the island is many things to many people and you sound like you have no idea or interest when you just throw shit at it.

    Then again perhaps just throwing shit at the biggest sporting organisation here in the hope some it sticks and taints one of the greatest successes in modern Ireland is the sum total of your ambitions?

    I hope this is not the case and the positions continually thrown at the GAA on here are genuinely held.

  • Dec

    But this is not the way to go

    Dan

    I was against this commeration on the grounds of Crip McWilliams involvement in the murder of Colm Mahon. However, I’ve no problems whatsoever with what he did subsequently.

  • jerryp

    Pardon my ignorance, but who or what is CRIP ?

  • El Paso

    dantheman,

    I don’t for a moment doubt your sincerity or bona fides as a “down fan” but you do come across as…welll….patronisingly trollish. And perhaps a little spiteful is a dishonest kinda way but that may be just a limitation of the written word.
    What would a non political GAA look like I wonder….no flags, no anthems, no presidential salute, no president(!), no All Irelands, no promotion of the Irish language, no promotion of Irish dance, no promotion of Irish pastimes…no GAA…where would it end you’d wonder. A ‘no politics’ IFA would logicaly lead to the dissolutiuon of the IFA on the grounds that its exitence supports a (failed)political experiment.
    Realist’s suggestion is “just for starters”. Can’t wait for the next tranche of helpful suggestions.

  • Slartibuckfast

    I hope one of his fans don’t try and emulate the actions of their hero now and shoot the manager of the club over this.

  • the futrures bright, the future’s orange

    Common sense prevails.

  • dantheman

    Dec,

    What he did to Colm McMahon should really be enough. What he did afterwards is irrelevant.

    El Paso,

    No need to doubt my credentials. I went to Wexford, Drogheda, Tullamore and Clones this year. I also saw their finest performance in a decade beating Tyrone. I really wish those who attack the GAA were there, a fantastic game. With no talk of politics from start to finish.

    Trollish and spiteful? Would you do me the decency of explaining why?

  • Reader

    El Paso: What would a non political GAA look like I wonder….no flags, no anthems, no presidential salute, no president(!), no All Irelands, no promotion of the Irish language, no promotion of Irish dance, no promotion of Irish pastimes…no GAA…where would it end you’d wonder.
    I’m sure we’ve been told that half of the stuff in your list isn’t political either. And there’s no reason an All Ireland organisation can’t operate while respecting the two main traditions on the island – there are plenty of All Ireland competitions in other sports.

  • Realist

    “If they want their position to get a fair hearing within the GAA they should be making an argument along the lines of “Don’t let yourselves be used” as opposed to “your association is this, is that, is the other””

    niall,

    You make a fair point, but the GAA is a democratic organisation.

    At Congress, it has a long history of voting on divisive “political” issues.

    For example, in 1979, Congress passed a motion that the Association “gives it’s unequivocal support to the struggle for national liberation”.

    A counter proposal to include the word “unarmed” was defeated.

    What,exactly, has that sort of stuff got to do with sport and culture?

    How does stuff like that “unify” Ireland?

    Can you see how shit like that alienates the very people the GAA would like to be “united” with in a 32 County Ireland?

    I appreciate and welcome that the Association is slowly making small steps away from the past.

    In order to be recognised as a solely sporting and cultural organisation, the Association needs to drop the quasi political rules, practices and ethos which exist in it’s very fabric.

    If it wants to continue as a nationalist/republican only, quasi political organisation (in addition to sports and culture), that’s ok too – that’s for members of the GAA to decide.

    It’s for the GAA to make up their mind what, exactly, they are – and where, exactly, they are going.

    As it stands, they’re doing a pretty good job of dividing the people of Ireland – quite an irony, when you think about it.

  • Modernist

    That was 30 years ago Mac, is it not time you found a new one?

  • are we a country?

    A’s it stands, they’re doing a pretty good job of dividing the people of Ireland – quite an irony, when you think about it.’

    lol-Aren’t the IFA and Northern Ireland team and fans doing the same by dividing irish soccer through their pathetic insistence on being subservient to the British anthem and Flag and clinging to their narrow, sectarian symbols?

    Wales and Scotland both have their own proud identities-Why don’t the NI fans throw off the shackles, like their celtic cousins, by ending their veto on an all-ireland team?
    Ironic it ain’t?

  • dantheman

    Realist,

    If you’re going back to 1979, would you accept the criticism levelled at the NI fans re: A Night in November 1993? In fairness that’s a lot more recent

  • Comrade Stalin

    I was against this commeration on the grounds of Crip McWilliams involvement in the murder of Colm Mahon. However, I’ve no problems whatsoever with what he did subsequently.

    The republican passion for justice, equality, and a fair trial by jury shining through once more.

  • dantheman

    Well the republicans who probably cancelled the event would probably disagree CS

  • Realist

    “If you’re going back to 1979, would you accept the criticism levelled at the NI fans re: A Night in November 1993? In fairness that’s a lot more recent”

    Unfortunately, dantheman, the quasi political rhetoric still exists in the GAA’s rules of 2008.

    It’s for the members of the, democratic, GAA to change that – if they so wish.

    “Why don’t the NI fans throw off the shackles, like their celtic cousins, by ending their veto on an all-ireland team?
    Ironic it ain’t?”

    I haven’t heard any such overtures from the splitters – ironic, isn’t it?

  • lee

    “As it stands, they’re doing a pretty good job of dividing the people of Ireland – quite an irony, when you think about it.”

    And this from someone who’s team insist on playing gstq, flying a unionist flag, singing pro-British songs and abuse their Catholic players.

    Dividing the people ????

  • dantheman

    Realist,

    Agreed re the All-Ireland team, the FAI should be driving it. At the moment they have shown no determined effort to do so.

    You may be correct regarding the GAA. But regarding my point there is still a lot of politics in the IFA. The members of the, democratic, IFA have failed to do anything about that. Despite an equality report commissioned by themselves which suggested action be taken.

  • Realist

    “But regarding my point there is still a lot of politics in the IFA. The members of the, democratic, IFA have failed to do anything about that. Despite an equality report commissioned by themselves which suggested action be taken”

    dantheman,

    What are you specifically referring to?

    What is this “lot of politics” – can you refer me to it in the IFA constitution?

    Then, we’ll do a comparison with the GAA'(written) Rules….cannot say fairer than that.

  • SEAN

    The decision by St Paul’s GAC , to disallow their club premises to be used for a Republican gathering , is nothing more than a PR stunt , to save any adverse baggage that would be attached to the club , had the event been approved . If the event had not come to the notice of the DUP , and a issue made of it , then the event would no doubt have taken place. Fact , plain and simple. Republicans were given free reign in the vast majority of GAA clubs, during the troubles to hold all sorts of meetings , fund raising, political gatherings, prisoner release parties, Republican music nights with the music provided by groups known as RA bands. Two blind eyes were turned in some areas as Republican took over and ran many clubs . In S. Derry , many clubs were nothing more than Republican dens. Just recently a cup named after three notorious IRA members who blew themselves up whilst attempting to plan a huge bomb in Magherafelt, was presented to a Gaelic team . The cup and competition is named after Bateson , Sheridan, and Lee. Nothing has changed in the GAA this past one hundred years . They still are and always will be, a backward , bigoted, anti British ,and Protestant body.

  • are we a country?

    Oh Dear, Realist appears to have quickly shed his plastic, Ghandhi-like ‘across the barricades’ persona, now that NI has inevitably returned to the backwaters of international football.

    Realist,ma chara, stop tugging your forelock! Leave behind the sectarian’ No Surrender’ chants that you uttered only a fortnight ago at Windsor Park and why not join with the rest of Ireland(like most other sports)and see how we do?

  • Rory

    SEAN,

    I didn’t realise that the GAA was, as you say, a “Protestant” body . But now that, thanks to you, I do know, I must say they are to be much commended for attracting such a large catholic nationalist and republican following.

    Truly one of the few non-sectarian Protestant sporting organisations would you say?

  • niall

    Realist,

    I don’t know if that’s true and I wasn’t born in 1979. I’m not saying you’re wrong. I have absolutely no idea what was decided at congress in 2008 either.

    However I have to ask do where you found out that information? Did you go digging for a fact to back up the position being adopted that the GAA is “bad”?

    I’m also fairly certain that it would not happen today.

    I say fairly certain, because of course there is a tendency, like politics in NI, that a certain kind of person is attracted to the mind numbingly boring world of the gaa committee. Honestly the people our local club sends to the county board meetings! They are the type you like to know are kept busy and out of the way a couple of nights a month. I’d love (and hate) to hear how they voted.

    The point I was trying to make is that the GAA is a strange beast. Consider the votes on the opening of Croke Park and how the different counties north and south voted.

    The origins of the GAA are what they are of course, and tied up with the desire for Independence. Today we assume most who follow the games have inherited those desires. Many in the Unionist community have the obvious heritage of being in opposition to those desires.

    Those are statements of fact though not absolute fact as I am certain in large swathes of the south there are those who play/watch GAA and never give the end of partition a thought.

    As I say the GAA is a strange and complex beast. In the north it is going through a period of success on the field combined with great confidence of the field for nationalists.

    I notice that the Unionist politicians increasingly seem antagonised on a GAA related theme.

    Do you think that this is basically annoyance at confident support for the GAA by wearing colours etc being always seen first and foremost as a declaration of desire for end to partition as opposed to support for a team?

    It seems that way to me.

    Also the constant desire to compare the GAA to the OO seems to me to be an effort to develop for Unionism in these post church going days a relationship between “their people” and a cultural outlet that is a mirror to the GAA.

    I don’t think the GAA and OO equate.

    But in what to you is probably an admission of my sectarianism I consider Irish to be an incomprehensible language while Ulster Scotch to me is a bad joke.

    There we have it, drivel from me but I was on a roll.

  • SEAN

    Rory – I think you know fine well what went on behind closed GAA clubroom doors during the troubles. Virtually every Protestant, man women and child knew that all GAA clubs were nothing more than Republican Dens. Republicans were at home there . Many S.Derry GAA Clubs , were notorious for their REPUBLICAN NIGHTS. One in our area was known to serve drinks free to all former IRA prisoners, on these nights ,and had a back room were the so called (on the run)drank with the more trusted senior members of the Club. The GAA , if it were in any other Democratic county would banned without any doubt whatsoever. All the bluff, lies, smoke screens , pr stunts , will never ever convince the vast majority of Protestant people that the GAA is untrustworthy ,and devious.

  • lee

    “What is this “lot of politics” – can you refer me to it in the IFA constitution”

    The fact that the president of the IFA is an active member of the Orange Order, an organisation that is openly sectarian, speaks volumes about who runs the association.

    How can he claim to support ‘football for all’ when he was happy to march with his sash in the Belfast 12th parade alongside banners that glorified loyalist mass murderers?

    As mentioned earlier in the thread, it would be interesting to know how many of those running the IFA are members of the Orange Order and do they even aliow ‘taigs’ on their Exec. Committee.

  • are we, are we, are we a country??

    ‘All the bluff, lies, smoke screens , pr stunts , will never ever convince the vast majority of Protestant people that the GAA is untrustworthy ,and devious.’

    Great to hear this Sean-obviously you feel that, apart from being a Protestant organisation, the GAA is in fact, trustworthy and not at all devious.

    Great to have you on board.

  • SEAN

    are we– The GAA is the sporting wing of the IRA. None of your smart quips will ever alter the fact, and bloody well you know it . The GAA pretends it only a sporting and cultural Organisation , but large numbers of their members played their quaint sports by day and butchered their Protestant neighbours by night. A fine sporting body of people your GAA.

  • Rory

    SEAN,

    Your last sentence asserts that the vast majority of Protestant people will always hold the GAA to be both trustworthy and lacking in deviousness, which, given that in your previous post you claimed that the GAA is a “Protestant body”, is hardly surprising.

    Still it’s nice that you consider that Protestants hold the GAA in such high esteem. Ecumenical attitudes like yours are sadly lacking among so many of our young today and yours must be applauded. I can just see you at one of those “Republican Nights”, demonstrating your cross-community spirit by buying drinks for Republican ex-prisoners. Very decent of you.

  • CW

    As someone pointed out, these comparisons between the GAA and Orange Order are tedious and inaccurate.

    If the Orange Order should be compared with any other organisation it should be the Ancient Order of Hibernians. They have a lot in common:

    Orange Order = Old men in bowler hats wearing orange sashes and carrying religious banners

    Hibernians = Old men in bowler hats wearing green sashes and carrying religious banners

    In fact the two organisations have so much in common that it would make sense for them to merge. They could call themselves the Ancient Orange Order of Hibernians and compromise by wearing yellow sashes.

    Cultural and religious differences gone in on fell swoop.

  • CW

    Correction: that should read “Cultural and religious differences gone in one fell swoop.

    Slightly off topic, I know, but it had to be said.

  • anyone for a booking form…. simple way forward

  • SEAN

    Rory– How did your local GAA CLUB , CELABRATE , when one of the local Protestant community was butchered by the IRA?.

  • SEAN

    Rory– How did your local GAA CLUB , CELABRATE , when one of the local Protestant community was butchered by the IRA?.

  • dantheman

    They celabrated with a spelling competiton SEAN, you get bonus POINTS for USING cApITAL LETTERS!!

  • Ranger1640

    lee

    And this from someone who’s team insist on playing gstq, flying a unionist flag, singing pro-British songs and abuse their Catholic players.

    Dividing the people ????
    When are the gaa going to stop plying their anti British solders song and flying the un-unifying tricolour and singing anti British Songs and idolising dead IRA and INLA terrorists?

    When are the gaa going to stop permitting clubs, pitches and competitions after dead IRA and INLA terrorists?

    What assurances will the gaa give if another Unionist, Protestant takes up gaa that they will not be abused like Darren Grahame?

    The gaa keeping Ireland divided from 1884

    Can I ask why if the gaa is so all things orish, on there web site of the header links at the top of the home page. Only 1 is for orish speakers and every thing else is in the Queens English?

    Hardly promoting orish but then again typical orish!

  • RepublicanStones

    ‘Can I ask why if the gaa is so all things orish, on there web site of the header links at the top of the home page. Only 1 is for orish speakers and every thing else is in the Queens English?’

    Taking into account you are probably ignorant of the historical attempt made to wipe the language itself out which accounte for the prevalence of spoken english, that aside, you also seem unaware that the site itsn’t just for irish people. im sure there are foreign people with a interest in Gaelic games who would like to learn more.

    But as your attitude is typical…tá sé leadránach agus nil suim dá laghád agam ann.

  • niall

    Ranger1640,

    I do hope you aren’t trying to troll a sucker and i’m it? Anyhow here goes..

    On your post at page 2 post 21 i’ll try some genuine answers at what I hope are genuine questions and not put with an air of “well I know the bloody answer to this but i’ll box what I assume are republicans in a corner by their inability to respond without being drawn into whataboutery”.

    I had attempted to pre-empt posts of your quality in my earlier attempt to explain something of the association.

    The GAA is like most sports an all ireland sport. It was established before the sectarian battle lines were drawn seemingly indelibly at partition. The desire of the majority on the island was for independence for the entire country. The GAA developed games that were unique to the island and were tied up with the understanding of national identity and the independence movement. This is a common enough idea, sometimes referred to in the wider real world as “a national sport”. The english i’d say have Football and Cricket for example.

    Therefore we now have a couple of generations after partition the grandchildren of those who wanted full independence still of that view. The national game is obviously reflection of this. Hence, the national flag and anthem.

    The present generation inherited these ideas much as I will assume you inherited yours. The thing about inherited ideas as I’m sure from your insightful comments you’ll appreciate is that they don’t always stand up well to thought through, intelligent, intelligible criticism.

    As for independence, this was not achieved and many continue to work towards this end and will continue to do so. There is a disagreement as to the nationality of people here…… and before you give me the blue bag answer “Eeryone is British”, let me say that isn’t a good enough answer.

    Others of course, including large numbers in the south couldn’t care less nowadays about independence. Indeed many there thing of people of the new Ulster Scotch heritage as being beyond the pale. This you may find amusing that in a dramatic turnaround the once industrious, intelligent, hardworking reputation of the Scots-Irish as often remarked upon at the birth of the USA could be beynd the pale in that place were the pale could be a natural home! Confusing eh fella!

    There are political parties in the Northern part of the island which concern themselves almost completely with the independence issue and it is frequently both on the news and commented upon on this forum. Its sectarianism 101 so you’ll find it easy.

    The scary thing for yourself is that I have played GAA with number of protestants over the years. I don’t know if they are Unionists. Did anyone ever say anything to them? No. The appropriate response if they did? Fisticuffs from the lads I’d say.

    The GAA can’t give assurances that it won’t happen again, try thinking it through and you’ll conclude the same.

    As for your “dig” about the Irish language that’s a childish way to put a point. Answer it yourself and tell me does it make you feel better? Or is it simply satisfaction to attempt annoy people?

    SEAN,

    With you i’ll agree to be disagreeable.

  • LURIG

    Sean,

    I am assuming your pseudonym is a p*ss take but if not, were you dropped from some senior team recently? You sound very bitter, angry and annoyed with the GAA. Were you beaten at handball by some wee girl or Under 14 member? Even worse you are not an OFFICIAL REPUBLICAN are you? They hate most things Irish, Republican, Gaelic and Catholic too. As someone has already said, there have been Loyalist elements who have been using Irish League Club Social Clubs as their meeting places and gathering points for years YET I have not heard a word raised in protest. In addition the fact that the head honcho of the IFA is an Orangeman, the IFA committees and Councils are full of Orangemen, Irish League football is stuffed full of anti-Catholic bigots AND it ALL gets ignored ALSO rankles with Nationalists. Not a heckle is raised within Unionism OR the media at this and the stinking hypocrisy is very hard to stomach. I also hope the next time Ulster plays a match at Ravenhill or a Cricket match is played at Stormont a BIG debate starts over why Catholics don’t play the games or are NOT made very welcome at them. I won’t hold my breath.

  • reggie

    ‘there have been Loyalist elements who have been using Irish League Club Social Clubs as their meeting places and gathering points for years’

    Correct-2 clubs-one Belfast, one from a provincial town spring to mind straight away. Action taken ? Sweet FA

  • Realist

    “The origins of the GAA are what they are of course, and tied up with the desire for Independence. Today we assume most who follow the games have inherited those desires. Many in the Unionist community have the obvious heritage of being in opposition to those desires”

    niall,

    Thanks for your well reasoned response.

    I think the above exert sums it up.

    It is the mixing of divisive political idealism with sport which is at the core of the issue.

    “But in what to you is probably an admission of my sectarianism I consider Irish to be an incomprehensible language while Ulster Scotch to me is a bad joke”

    I don’t see any evidence of sectarianism at all in your posts.

    For what it’s worth, I consider Irish to be a language that all the people of Ireland should be able to cherish and respect as part of our shared history (it’s a pity it’s been hijacked for political point scoring), and Ulster Scots to be a mere dialect.

  • Greagoir O’ Frainclin

    This gesture by the GAA has to be welcomed by all!

  • Democratic

    It should be Greagoir – but then both sides (i.e some of the supposed fans of either GAA/IFA) wouldn’t get throwing their rocks from the safety of their plate glass houses…I would venture the opinion that the stone chuckers ain’t true sports fans at all and are only interested in political one-upmanship which of course neither side can win anyway as things stand…..futile in the extreme – but been going on here for years…

  • niall

    Greagoir & Democratic I agree with what you both say.

    Realist,

    “It is the mixing of divisive political idealism with sport which is at the core of the issue.”

    I accept the problem Unionists have on this very point. I’m not sure that is a problem to be “solved”.

    The GAA is what it is. I hate to see it hijacked upon Slugger, or more importantly in the real world by those who would make it a stage for sectarian point scoring.

    I have the desire to see end to partition and a love for gaeilic games.

    Do I think young people from the “other” side should play the games?

    Abso-bloody-lutely, they are addictive brilliant games to be involved in. Do I think they have to abandon their politics to do so? No way.

    As it happens I played rugby at Uni and when abroad after uni and remain bitter at the fact I never got to play as a child due to being from the grim north.

    We have to wise up people.

  • Ri Na Deise

    A good move by the GAA and one which should be applauded.
    McWilliams subsequent murder of loathsome scumbag Wright doesnt alter the fact he himself was as loathsome a scumbag.

    Sectarianism is a cancer on this land and only when we collectively tackle this scourge head on will we finally break the shackles of our colonial past/present.

  • niall

    I’d be pulling the strings for Ulster and Ireland now of course. A missed opportunity for them both.

    He says. Fridays, eh!

  • Realist

    niall,

    “I accept the problem Unionists have on this very point. I’m not sure that is a problem to be “solved””

    That’s fine.

    “I have the desire to see end to partition and a love for gaelic games.”

    I’m trying to understand why, in a modern Ireland, the two have to be intertwined?

    “Do I think young people from the “other” side should play the games?

    Abso-bloody-lutely, they are addictive brilliant games to be involved in. Do I think they have to abandon their politics to do so? No way.”

    Can you understand how the divisive quasi political rhetoric, inherent in the very rules of the GAA, means that many people from “the other side” are reluctant to get involved in these brilliant games?

    Can you see that by dropping the “politics”, the GAA would be doing more to unify the people of Ireland?

    “As it happens I played rugby at Uni and when abroad after uni and remain bitter at the fact I never got to play as a child due to being from the grim north.”

    Many would argue that the IRFU, an organisation devoid of any political rhetoric in it’s constitution, does more to “unite” people from different political backgrounds on this island through the medium of sport than the GAA.

  • John Furlong’s Ceylon

    Can’t we all just get along?

  • SEAN

    Lurig– Yes I am bitter towards the GAA. The GAA will never ever be acceptable to the vast majority of Protestant people. The GAA,supported violent Irish Nationalism, and put at Republican disposal ,not only it clubroom’s, but it membership. The Protestant people were not fooled ,by what was going on in GAA clubs during the troubles. Its shady history which they thought was hidden and secret behind closed GAA clubroom’s doors has been known all along by the Protestant community. The GAA will always carry the baggage that it covertly supported violent Irish Nationalism, and turned a blind eye as their Protestant neighbours were butchered by these very same people who they supported in every way possible.

  • niall

    Realist,

    “I’m trying to understand why, in a modern Ireland, the two have to be intertwined?”

    Maybe they don’t. The beginning they are coming from means that they have been, as for the future, they may not be intertwined although for many they overlap and get seen as one and the same thing.

    “Can you understand how the divisive quasi political rhetoric, inherent in the very rules of the GAA, means that many people from “the other side” are reluctant to get involved in these brilliant games?

    Yes.

    Can you see that by dropping the “politics”, the GAA would be doing more to unify the people of Ireland?”

    Yes.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    “[/i]Abso-bloody-lutely, they are addictive brilliant games to be involved in. Do I think they have to abandon their politics to do so? No way.”[/i]

    There’s a bit of Ned Flander’s naievity about you in more ways than one, niall.

  • niall

    thanks umh! Of course my immediate reaction is to say i’m not but who really knows.

    Interesting that you’d find a line of attack as opposed to just saying you think something i commented on was naive.

    Ned Flanders and his lot run the USA don’t they, and make some very strange decisions in fairness!