Tight game at Croker?

Outside the sport of it, my personal interest in the Championship these year ended with the departure of Donegal and Down. But in the first half of the Tyrone Kerry clash the Ulster team have done well to keep in touch with a much classier kingdom team. A lot of argybarging just before the whistle. If Tyrone can keep in their skins it could be close by the end. But not for the first time this year, Tyrone’s vintage stars are looking a little tired.

  • ggn

    TE G,

    I find that whilst Gaelic football is the preference of the majority there are contexts which young people will resort to soccer.

    Limited space, tarmac and if they want a relaxed kick about, it always seemed to me that it was possible to play soccer at a lighter tempo whilst with Gaelic football it is all or nothing.

    That said, a kick about was always out of the hands for us, just feels more natural to catch the thing that let it hit your own head!

    That said I know of only one person round our way who has actually played a proper game of soccer, 11 aside etc.

    No! I know two, I forgot about meself! I found it alot less physical aside form the shins (ouch!), and alot less scary.

    The tension in soccer is very different as well due to the lack of scoring oppurtunities.

  • Tir Eoghain Gael

    I love to watch a good game of soccer myself and I try to take my younger brother over to Anfield or Parkhead whenever I can.
    I would consider myself a Celtic fan but I am not one of the “We” brigade that follow both the Premiership and old firm, “We are going to win this” and “We are signing such n such” That really annoys me, I just dont have that connection with soccer teams I enjoy a Celtic match like I enjoy a good concert, I am there for the entertainment and the atmosphere.

    I agree that soccer is probably easier to play when you are in a small group just for a kickaround at the park, cause when you kick a point way over the bar without catchnets you would usually be sent by the goalie to retrieve the ball again from the next field!!

  • SEAN

    ggn– That the way the majority of people want it, can you name the Catholic Schools were children are asked what games they want to play. Why is it that in the past number of years or so many people who play and support Gaelic Games , and particularly GAELIC ,want to disown the name GAELIC , and steal another code name for their game. Are they ashamed of the name GAELIC , that the game has been known as for the past 90 years or so, why. The word FOOTBALL in the vast majority of countries in the world is also known as the Beautiful game, and the World game.In AMERICA , because AMERICAN rugby, they named it soccer. What utter nonsense , RUGBY , and FOOTBALL , are not popular. I hope someone will help me out here ,which Republic of Ireland manager , gave a interview to the OBSERVER,(a few years ago) and said . (quote) If you took a trip in a helicopter , and looked down into the schoolyards in Ireland, you will see in every school, children playing FOOTBALL, but look at the pitches and what do you see , they are all GAELIC goalpost. Can you explain how a lack of resources in Football and Rugby , has got anything to do with a school allowing it pupils to represent their School in these games on equal terms to GAELIC GAMES. Next time you drive past any SCHOOL, be it INTERGRATED , CATHOLIC, PROTESTANT, primary or secondary, you will find that 99% of the time that there are children playing FOOTBALL, the other1% they are either playing netball or basketball . In fact GAELIC GAMES are not chosen by the pupils as their choice of games , but are chosen for them .

  • ggn

    Sean,

    Let me get this staight you think that the GAA is some sort of conspiracy to force being againist their will into playing Gaelic games.

    Surely there would be some kind of protest?

    As to the semantics of the word football. Really, I dont care. I feel that I simply reported the fact that for the majority of people in Ireland, football by default means Gaelic football and soccer is used to describe the Association Football code.

    If people want to call Gaelic football simply as Gaelic so be it, but to my mind Gaelic is a language.

    I would describe what you call football as soccer for the simple reason that people in my own area would misunderstand me if I didnt. Dont be offended!

  • Tir Eoghain Gael

    Sean

    Gaelic was never drummed into us at school we had a choice of whatever games we wanted to play. I went to St Ciarans Ballygawley, which has a rich history of Gaelic Games, in fact the current Tyrone Manager Micky Harte managed our gaelic team,(not even he could make a decent player out of me!!)
    St Ciarans put forward teams in basketball soccer, netball, cross country but it was their history in gaelic games and their setup that would attract students to choose St Ciarans over a school say in Dungannon or Omagh to further their gaelic skills.
    If there is no demand there for it schools simply would not have the budgets to promote it to kids who are not interested, it would be dropped.

  • ggn

    Sean,

    I hope these calls for equality for soccer and rugby with Gaelic games in all schools in Ireland is universal.

    I take it you support the option of Gaelic games in state schools in Northern Ireland?

  • flaminglip

    “I’ll leave you with a confident forecast: NI counties will win at least half of the next 20 all-Irelands. When Tyrone have won it for the tenth time, you’ll probably get my point.”

    Haha! The whole of Ulster didn’t have a team in the semi-final in 2006 and 2007, then Tyrone (the only Northern team that’s really capable of winning the all-ireland at the moment) have a successful year and you immediately belittle it as it doesn’t suit your agenda to do otherwise. If you want to argue about flags or anthems, fine, but this is very, very silly.

  • SEAN

    I would support fully the inclusion of GAELIC games into state schools, but,and there always a but, as regards GAELIC games , and that is the problem. How on earth are you to convince the vast majority of parents of the children . Parents who know the history of the GAA , and its links to the Catholic Church , IRISH NATIONALISIM, and in the recent past ,violent Irish Nationalism. The facts can and never for some be just wished away. Parents who know that their local GAA , Clubroom’s were used to host republican nights. and the groups providing the music , were known as RA bands , who sang songs which glorified terrorism, fund raising nights for republican prisoners, welcome home parties for released republican prisoners, hunger strike meetings,naming clubroom’s, trophies , and grounds after the very people who terrorised there communities and caused death and mayhem to their own PROTESTANT NEIGHBOURS. I am afraid that the problem , and its a problem the GAA , is if it really want to be a sport for all will have to deal with.

  • flaminglip

    Sean, I went to the most successful GAA school in the North (well in this decade), and during P.E. we usually played indoor soccer. You’re crazy if you think people were forced against their will to play Gaelic Football.

  • addy

    methinks that ‘Sean’ has the whiff of the troll…

  • Tir Eoghain Gael

    “SEAN”
    What exactly is this link to the catholic church you talk about?

  • Dewi

    “Soccer” is best – where I live “Rugby” is “football”….each to his own….

  • PeaceandJustice

    To Billy aka Brian Feeney

    I’m not saying any organisation is without fault. But the leadership of the Orange Order has spoken out against groups trying to use the Order for their own ends. Contrast this with the leadership of the GAA who open pitches named after Republican death squad members and make no attempt to stop their clubs being used by criminal gangs e.g. Sinn Fein PIRA.
    According to Donall O Murchu, the director of the Ulster Council, use of the properties by people who were involved in Republican death squads is “within the remit of the clubs concerned”. By his choice of works, one can only assume that he supports such events.

    Given your repeated false allegations (once again) I don’t and never have supported terrorism of any kind. It would be nice if you had something to say about the links between violent Republicanism and the GAA instead of your usual rant. That might be too much to ask – a bit like asking the GAA to compromise and move forward.

  • tony

    But the leadership of the Orange Order has spoken out against groups trying to use the Order for their own ends

    p&j;I seem to recall quite a number of Senior Belfast orangeman like Billy Mahwinney claiming a few years back that loyalist paramilitaries “ are an integral part of the unionist community and are our protectors”

    Or the Deputy Grand Master of Belfast saying “The UVF are on our side and continue to defend the orange order”.

  • Mick Fealty

    Sean,

    A lot of schools rarely play Gaelic. Clubs play a much larger part in the development of the game than some other codes.

  • SEAN

    Tir eoghain Gael–What exactly is the link between the Catholic Church and the GAA. You are not serious. This information is for those who know the GAA and the Catholic are intricately linked but are unaware how it works. No GAA Facility, be it Clubroom , Gaelic Pitch, or any major infrastructure , can be declared officially opened , unless a CATHOIC religious service take place on the official opening day . The service can either be a MASS celebrated in the club rooms , or a Catholic Bishop, or Priest blessing of the facility.It is customary that Catholic Bishops and Priest are in many GAA Clubs, made HOUNARY members. There is no GAA CLUB in the area that I live in that does not have a ANNUAL MASS, for all it members and players. This practice is widespread throughout the vast majority of GAA CLUBS. No major facilities is ever opened without the OFFICIAL opening party having several high rank BISHOPS or PRIESTS as official guest. There has never been a ALL IRELAND FINAL played that the HIREARCHORY of the Catholic Church were not Official guest. Up until the the late sixties , a All Ireland Gaelic or Hurling final , a Bishop , came on to the field and threw the ball in to start the game. All Ireland Finals, or any other major final up on till (about ten years ago ,)it was traditional for the band to play the tune FAITH OF OUR FATHERS, which symbolizes the link between the GAA , and it members being of the CATHOLIC FAITH. This years All Ireland Finals , once again a high rankin member of CATHOLIC CHURCH, along with the GAA President and his wife, were interduced prior to the start of the matches, this again a symbol of the links between the CATHOLIC CHURCH and GAA. The list is endless of BISHOPS,and PRIESTS who have held high office on County Boards, local GAA clubs, and the very top of he leadership since the GAA, was purposely created out of sheer vindictivness to counter act the enjoyment young IRISH men women and children were getting from playing FOOTBALL and RUGBY, and other games the GAA FAMOUSLY declared unfit for a good CATHOLIC boy or girl to participate in. They named these games as we all knowtoday as GARRISION GAMES, or FORIGN GAMES. Because of it loyalty to the CATHOLIC CHURCH, the GAA were in a way rewarded by the Church who ran virtually every CATHOLIC school in Ireland, allowed the for decades sole right to their games being the offical games in all schools.

  • SEAN

    flaminglip– You went to a GAA school , that says it all. Yes you were not forced to play GAELIC any more than you were forced to go to ENGLISH, HISTORY, or any other class. You had no choice , you just got on with it. Your school as you even admit was a GAA school, as is the vast majority of Catholic Schools. Playing either indoor Football , Basketball , etc does not change a thing. Nobody is suggestion for one moment that you were dragged kicking and screaming to play GAELIC GAMES. As the saying goes , when in Rome, you do as the Romans do, its that simple. Surely you are not seriously suggesting that among the hundred and thousands of children that went to your school over the years , that given the choice , on totally equal terms with GAELIC Games, there was not those who would have loved to had a Rugby or Football team to represent the school. Where was this choice for them, that you imply. The simple truth is as you well know, there was no choice.

  • PeaceandJustice

    To tony – There are always some individuals in all groups who have their own opinion. But let me quote the following statement from the leadership of the Orange Order: “The Loyal Orange Institution is very clear in its attitude to violence and terrorism. Violence is morally wrong and no-one should engage or support violent activity to further their ends.”

    Compare this with the GAA LEADERSHIP who open pitches named after Republican death squad members and don’t see any need to stop Sinn Fein PIRA criminals using GAA clubs for events. The silence from the SDLP on this matter is a disgrace. And they don’t even have anything to say about the loutish behaviour of GAA fans in Tyrone

  • flaminglip

    “flaminglip– You went to a GAA school , that says it all. Yes you were not forced to play GAELIC any more than you were forced to go to ENGLISH, HISTORY, or any other class. You had no choice , you just got on with it. Your school as you even admit was a GAA school, as is the vast majority of Catholic Schools. Playing either indoor Football , Basketball , etc does not change a thing. Nobody is suggestion for one moment that you were dragged kicking and screaming to play GAELIC GAMES. As the saying goes , when in Rome, you do as the Romans do, its that simple. Surely you are not seriously suggesting that among the hundred and thousands of children that went to your school over the years , that given the choice , on totally equal terms with GAELIC Games, there was not those who would have loved to had a Rugby or Football team to represent the school. Where was this choice for them, that you imply. The simple truth is as you well know, there was no choice.”

    Eh? We had a rugby team too, we just happend to be very successful at Gaelic Football. You’re scaring me a little.

  • consul

    Serious congratulations to Tyrone, thought earlier in the season it would definitely be Kerry again. But their defensive displays against Cork suggested a weakness that may not have been there in other years. I think the Red Hands prevailed because their defence is vastly superior to Kerry’s. You never see Tyrone giving up many soft scores. McConnell’s save from O’Sullivan possibly the pivotal moment in the match and they really burned Kerry in the dying embers. Good result for the game in general.

  • Doctor Who

    I hope Tyrone win the team prize in this years BBC Sports Personality of the year awards. Bringing oul Sam back to the UK yet again.

    Congratulations.

  • PJ Cahill

    The Orange Order supported the Murder Squads known as the SAS and the British Army.

  • Formerly Uninterested Observer

    The GAA do promote one foreign game.

    Anyone care to guess what it is?

  • Realist

    “The GAA do promote one foreign game.

    Anyone care to guess what it is?”

    Rounders.

    Do I win a prize?

    Perhaps I can have a free ticket to listen to mass sectarian murderer, Bik McFarlane, talk of the Maze breakout at the RGU GAA Club in Downpatrick next Friday night?

    Wonder will he be telling his captivated audience what he was doing in the Maze in the first place?

    By the way, I always find the GAA supporters’ “whataboutery” concerning the Orange Order most revealing.

  • RepublicanStones

    Well, people in big colonial glass houses shouldn’t….

  • CW

    Yet another sadly predictable example of a thread which has gone way off topic and turned into a another whataboutery contest.

    As a lifelong Tyrone supporter with no political affilations I was delighted to see the cup come back to the red hand county. The victory was all the sweeter considering it was against Kerry and also due the the fact that Tyrone were written off at the beginning of the season as a spent force following a mediocre league campaign. Down supporters should also take encouragement in being the only team to have beaten Tyrone in the championship. Here’s to Sam coming up to the not-so-grim north more often in future. Mickey Harte will no doubt go down in GAA history alongside Pete McGrath, Mick O’Dwyer and Kevin Heffernan as one of the greatest managers of all time.