IFA: no egos and no prawn sandwiches…

Nice innovation from the IFA, in the shape of a podcast interview with Caroline Menary the new marketing bod behind a vigorous billboard campaign to get people to come to Irish League matches for the first time… Good start, look forward to hearing more…

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  • qubol

    Innovative?? Hmmmm not sure how ‘innovative’ a podcast is. It might be only in the sense of being relative to their previous efforts. What next, a ground breaking bebo group?

  • Ulsters my homeland

    Does the IFA get much support in the Catholic schools? In my school days, the Catholic schools mainly focused on rugby and gaelic. Has things changed much?

  • qubol

    UMH, this could be a slippery slope but for the record. Football does *not* equal IFA. Catholic schools play a lot of football. Not sure that’s got much to do with the subject at hand – IFA league attendance marketing campaigns.

  • Ulsters my homeland

    [i]”Football does *not* equal IFA.”[/i]

    care to explain what sport it oversees then?

    “[i]Catholic schools play a lot of football. Not sure that’s got much to do with the subject at hand – IFA league attendance marketing campaigns.”[/i]

    If there’s a lack of support of Irish league matches from Catholic schools, then I think it’s quite reasonable to ask if marketing campaigns should be aimed at these schools.

  • austin

    ‘If there’s a lack of support of Irish league matches from Catholic schools….’

    Judging by the attendances, there’s a lack of support of Irish league matches from Controlled Schools as well.-or ‘Protestant’ schools in your parlance,UMH.

  • Dec

    Does the IFA get much support in the Catholic schools? In my school days, the Catholic schools mainly focused on rugby and gaelic. Has things changed much?

    Utterly nonsensical.

    Unfortunately for the IFA all the marketing campaigns in the world won’t distract from the fact that the product is woeful and the facilities are grim.

  • Chris Donnelly

    UMH

    Given that my own ‘catholic’ school have a tremendous record of winning under 10 and under 11 inter-schools soccer competitions at a Belfast and six-county wide level, I’d say you’re a bit out of touch on this one.

    And, though I’m personally a fan of the oval ball game, I don’t know many catholic schools specialising in rugby in the north; most concentrate on Gaelic games and soccer at both primary and secondary level.

  • McGinster

    My school focused on football and Gaelic football and introduced rugby to students who had no other experience of it.

    As a big Cliftonville fan I know there are many Catholics of all ages who support Irish League teams, especially the Reds, Omagh, Newry, Donegal Celtic, Distillery and even a few travel down from Ballycastle to watch Coleraine. For that reason I really don’t think it would be a waste of time to appeal to Catholic schools or nationalists as a whole to come out and support the local game.

  • rubin

    ‘As a big Cliftonville fan I know there are many Catholics of all ages who support Irish League teams, especially the Reds, Omagh, Newry, Donegal Celtic, Distillery and even a few travel down from Ballycastle to watch Coleraine.’

    The attendences at Irish league games do not back up your claims.

    The DC & Newry Town are lucky to attract a couple of hundred supporters at a home game.

    Granted the Reds can get a bit of a crowd if its a ‘big’ game, but some home games last season only got a few hundred throught he gates.

    Omagh don’t exist any more, probably beacause there was almost zero support in the town for the team.

    From personal experience, the problems are as much to do with being part of a league administered by the IFA.

    Its difficult to have confidence in an association that had to be threatened with legal action by the Equality Commission over its ‘treatment’ of Donegal Celtic.

  • Realist

    “No egos, no prawn sandwiches, no referees for the start of the new league”

    “Granted the Reds can get a bit of a crowd if its a ‘big’ game, but some home games last season only got a few hundred throught he gates”

    Less than 300 souls attended the Setanta Cup game between Cliftonville and Cork City at Suffolk Road on Monday night.

  • UMH – not sure where you get your info from. At least in recent decades, Catholic schools pretty much all play football, and in Belfast they arguably take it more seriously than GAA. After all, they can actually win football trophies as opposed to be being eaten alive by mad culchies when they play Gaelic at any serious level.

    Rugby is the new fangled thang in Catholics schools. I was one of the first people to play rugby at our school about 20 years ago. There have been real efforts by some rugby clubs to expand youth rugby into both Catholic schools and state secondaries. There are quite a lot of Catholics playing youth rugby at a number of clubs – Dungannon and City of Derry spring to mind – but St. Columb’s is still the only Catholic school that can actually field a Schools’ Cup XV.

    Often it depends on the enthusiasm of a single teacher or senior pupil; quite a few people from St. Malachy’s played youth rugby at Malone along with me but I think it’s all died off since.

  • austin

    Sad to say, the Irish League doesn’t get the crowds it deserves as everyone nowadays thinks global these days and that SKY TV is God.
    I used to go to all the local grounds to support an irish league team for many years and I have to say that I had some really memorable nights- some great but most of them miserable hard luck stories. However at least the local game stirred up the oul’ emotions in a way that watching a Premiership game on a plastic tube could never do.
    Better go as I’m beginning to sound like Ron Manager..

  • Chris Donnelly

    Sammy

    How dare ya!
    Didn’t you know that The Raffo Cup (Belfast Primary Schools version of ‘The All-Ireland’) was back in north Belfast for the first time in yonks following a spectacular performance by our own lads last June!

    Mind you, the Armagh/ Tyrone brigade on the staff still reckon they’d hardly get a look-in agin the boys back home….

  • Lee

    Maybe Caroline (IFA) could produce a video to show the ‘great atmosphere’ at ‘international’ matches.

    Here’s a few clips Caroline could include..

    What a spectacle !!!!!

    Was that podcast or prodcast ??

  • austin

    I have to say that I was shocked at the clip of the Northern Ireland fans burning the tricolour.NI were playing Scotland, not the Republic for chrissake!

    This is the type of behaviour we’ve become familiar with around July bonfires but not inside a football ground.

    Evidently the same drunken, sectarian neanderthals who drink Buckfast around the boney whilst cheering masked and armed loyalist terrorists also form part of ‘the best support in Europe’-what a joke…

  • Realist

    “I have to say that I was shocked at the clip of the Northern Ireland fans burning the tricolour.NI were playing Scotland, not the Republic for chrissake!”

    austin,

    The youtube footage above of the tricolour being burnt was not taken at the Scotland game – or any other Northern Ireland international game for that matter.

    “Evidently the same drunken, sectarian neanderthals who drink Buckfast around the boney whilst cheering masked and armed loyalist terrorists also form part of ‘the best support in Europe’-what a joke…”

    There is much evidence on youtube of drunken, sectarian, neanderthal football supporters professing support for terrorist organisations – from both sides of the sectarian divide.

    To consistently highlight only one sides flaws, whilst ignoring the other, points to a sectarian agenda.

  • rubin

    Realist

    The podcast deals mostly about attracting new supporters to Carnegie League games.

    The highlighted video, shows Linfield supporters singing sectarian songs while burning an Irish flag within Windsor Park.

    Apart from the obvious Health & Safety issues surrounding this act (especially as Windsor Park is another Bradford waiting to happen), is it not fair enough to question the reality on the terraces, rather than the false perception on the podcast.

    Let’s face it, when Northern Ireland fans started booing Scotland players who played for Celtic and cheering the Rangers contingent in Scotland colours, something is wrong. But perhaps it fits in with the Rangers bouncey, rule brittania, dambusters, no surrender etc….that is the norm at Northern Ireland games.

  • Realist

    rubin,

    “Apart from the obvious Health & Safety issues surrounding this act (especially as Windsor Park is another Bradford waiting to happen), is it not fair enough to question the reality on the terraces, rather than the false perception on the podcast”

    Of course it’s fair.

    Sectarianism is a major problem in our society.

    Sectarianism at local football grounds is not the sole problem of Linfield FC.

    It’s something that the IFA and clubs need to continue working at to seek it’s eradication.

    Similar problems exist at football grounds in Scotland – both sides of the divide engaged in it.

    People who only highlight the flaws in one community, whilst ignoring the problem with their own community, are part of the sectarian problem.

    They are not part of any solution.

    “Let’s face it, when Northern Ireland fans started booing Scotland players who played for Celtic and cheering the Rangers contingent in Scotland colours, something is wrong”

    Again, you make my point for me.

    You seem to forget the booing of Rangers players (and cheering of Celtic players) not too far down the road.

    You forget the “Stand Up If You Hate the Brits” chants, the “add ons” to The Fields, the racist abuse of players, the chants in support of paramilitary organisations (responsible for sectarian slaughter) that eminates from “fans” of a nationalist/republican hue.

    I’ll skip on the, pointless, youtube wars.

    Therefore, I conclude, that you must have a bigoted, sectarian, agenda.

  • kensei

    Sammy

    AFAIK St Malachy’s has had a go at introducing rugby in recent times. And I do seem to recall some limited success in GAA as well as soccer in my time there.

    Basketball and cross country running were the other really big things at St Mac’s.

  • rubin

    Realist

    The podcast relates to the Carnegie Irish league and the IFA international team, which is what i commented on.

    The main difference between the supporters of Northern Ireland and other club & international teams is the ability of their support to target their own players because of their religious persuasion or club allegience.

    Lennon,Jennings,Rogan etc…were all targeted by their own supporters, rather than opposition support.

    I mentioned the NI v Scotland to game to emphasise that for many of your supporters,their own political, religious and club allegience is more important than supporting ‘their’ team.

    Why else would you cheer the opposition players?

    And what about the flying of the banner “Thank you Sir David – our culture is not a crime,”

    I know the IFA president is an active member of the orange order, but i wasn’t aware that they were playing Scotland!

  • austin

    I see the ‘best fans in Europe’ have been the victims of an unprovoked sectarian attack by Slovakian security men. No doubt Realist will conclude that this attack was part of a sectarian agenda and that the Slovakian goons are ‘part of the problem and not part of the solution’.

  • lee

    It seems that some bottles and glasses were flying around during the skirmish!