PRONI archives go online

There’s still no official explanation for the additional £8million announced in August 2007.. but the NI Culture minister [and young-Earther – Ed] the DUP’s Edwin Poots today announced the launch of the new website for the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI). And, as I suggested back in October 2006, they’ve made progress on the process of digitising the records they hold. Now available online are the 1912 Ulster Covenant, an index to the 1858-c.1920 will calendar entries (grants of probate and letters of administration) and historical Freeholders’ records, the annual releases, the introductions to significant privately deposited archives, and additional guides and indexes.. and more to come..On Local history

What’s available online?

The Ulster Covenant archive and Freeholders records held by PRONI have been digitised and indexed and are available on the PRONI website. These online archives are fully searchable and have links to digitised images of the original documents.

A project to index and digitise 1858 – c1900 wills from the District Probate Registries of Armagh, Belfast and Londonderry is almost complete. Phase one – an index to the will calendar entries (grants of probate and letters of administration) – is now available on the PRONI website. Phase two – to link the will calendar entries to the digitised images of the wills – will follow shortly.

Family history researchers can search for ancestors who may be recorded in the above sources.

Some of PRONI’s guides and indexes are also available online.

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  • Chris Donnelly

    PRONI provides an invaluable service to anyone interested in genealogical studies. I’ve just finished compiling a family history and thoroughly enjoyed the entire experience.

    Special mention should go to the Church of the Latter Day Saints, without whom we would not be able to view many of the census records from the early 20th century held in PRONI.

  • It would be nice to have a NIGenWeb that could match USGenWeb.

    Just imagine the income available from GenTourism, considering the number of descendants of those who migrated from here over the centuries.

    Digitization of Irish 1901 and 1911 census records

  • The Covenant search function is very easy to use – fascinating to find out for sure who signed in my family!

  • Damian O’Loan

    “PRONI provides an invaluable service to anyone interested in genealogical studies. I’ve just finished compiling a family history and thoroughly enjoyed the entire experience.

    Special mention should go to the Church of the Latter Day Saints, without whom we would not be able to view many of the census records from the early 20th century held in PRONI.

    Posted by Chris Donnelly on Jan 10, 2008 @ 11:06 PM”

    Whilst after the fact, I think these records, provided exclusively, could have formed a particular attraction related to the Giant’s Causeway Visitor’s Centre (I don’t wish to touch on related controversy; if tourism is to be important, this is important).

    Perhaps there might be another related possibility?

  • Chris Donnelly

    Damian

    Maybe it’s the time of the night- or end of week haziness on the brain, but I’m not following you at all, though I’d surely like to.

    Please elaborate, or at the very least send me an email explaining your point.

  • Damian O’Loan

    Nothing too precise, Chris. I’ve simply thought for some time that if material useful to those interested in tracing their Irish lineage could be provided exclusively in the Visitor’s Centre, it would provide a boost to tourism, and a rather pleasant day out. The post provided me with an example, but I would hope there are others.

    Its really an area I know very little about.

  • Chris Donnelly

    Damian
    Get you now.

    You may have a point. I know that the Cardinal O’Fiaich Library in Armagh city holds the records for births/ deaths/ marriages for specific, local parishes in the 19th century, so there could be scope for a Visitors Centre/ Library facility in the vicinity of the Causeway Centre hosting similar records for parishes in the region- you may be on to something there.