Kids survey: God fearing, but confused about identity…

Usual caveats on this BBC Newsround children’s survey, especially this disaggregation of Northern Irish figures (based on just 100 kids). But the headline figures suggest that more kids believe in God in Northern Ireland, strangely they seem less than sure about their nationality:

Half of those interviewed in Northern Ireland said they did not know their nationality, however, 23% said they were British, 14% said they were Irish, whilst four said they were English.

H/T Parci.

  • parci

    oops Mick, that’ll be 1000 children

  • joeCanuck

    I don’t find the nationality thing at all surprising, Mick.
    Former Prime Minister was asked, on Panorama I think, after he had retired, what his nationality was. His reply was that he didn’t know.
    I think that it is true that the earlier leaders of Unionism considered themselves to be Irish; they were Irish Unionists and wanted Ireland as a whole to remain united with the rest of the UK.
    After the Treaty, they then choose to consider themselves to be British.

  • joeCanuck

    Former PM Terence O’Neill.

  • “Half of those interviewed in Northern Ireland said they did not know their nationality”

    One in the eye for the identity fetishists and the community rights industry.

  • Mick Fealty

    100 in NI is how I read it, Parci…

  • parci

    ok, its 1000 altogether and 100 in NI. Got it.

  • T.Ruth

    Maybe they were all telling the truth about how they perceived their nationality.Maybe we should be discussing the content of the curriculum and the context in which it should be delivered before we jump into the dark. Catriona Ruane is not very credible as a Minister for Education.
    T.Ruth

  • kensei

    Wa?

  • francesco

    i have to express my deepest sympathy to those 4 brave lads who defined themself as english… poor blokes like!

  • kensei

    “i have to express my deepest sympathy to those 4 brave lads who defined themself as english… poor blokes like!”

    They might actually be English, though.

  • joeCanuck

    Indeed kensei.
    It is not by any means inconceivable that 4 children out of these particular 100 living in N.I. are English.
    Perhaps they should be complimented rather than felt sorry for in knowing who they are.

  • parci

    National Identity is one of the key indicators in how we define ourselves; for kids growing up in norn iron not knowing who they are means instability and insecurity created at a young age.
    I find that desperately sad 🙁

  • mnob

    parci – you are of course correct.

    However 14% saying they are Irish must be a bit of a blow for those waiting for demographic change to get their 50% + 1.

  • parci

    mnob
    I still think its possible to wave a magic wand and everyone will wake up and go “hey we’re all irish”
    Trouble is where do you go to buy one of these wands. Tried Tescoes.. no luck .
    The search goes on 🙂

  • DK

    The last one of these I saw, Children were favouring the term “Northern Irish” – maybe more would have chosen this, if it was offered?

  • eranu

    Northern Irish is the term i find most people use. But British is the only official nationality of anyone in the UK. thats the facts.
    it would help kids alot if politicians used the same terms. if unionists could bring themselves to say Northern ‘Irish’ and nationalists could bring themselves to say ‘Northern Ireland’ then we’d be making a bit of progress towards the real world.

  • manichaeism

    What a horrible phrase! “God fearing”

    In other words “afraid of God”

    And it is always presented as being a positive thing!

  • sevenmagpies

    “National Identity is one of the key indicators in how we define ourselves”

    There’s no reason why it should be. Maybe they’ve started to grow out of it?

  • The Truth

    Shur everyone who worship at the alter of england and want to die english might as well call themselves english. If these slave-minded individuals even campaigned for an independant 6 counties I’d have more respect for them. Slaves, slaves all of ye……….

  • The Truth

    And by the way theres no such thing as northern Irish. People in Malin head are Irish, nothing else, and their more northern than anyone.

  • T.Ruth

    Yes-and many of them are quite literate in English and know to to spell many simple English words.
    T.Ruth

  • Oiliféar

    Perci: “After the Treaty, they then choose to consider themselves to be British.” Yes, certainly after the treaty, but the Troubles really kicked it off. See here (scroll down to the table called “Religion and national identity”) for the big leap away from “Ulster” or “Irish” to “British”.