Writing Irish History

A short Irish Times news report notes the re-uniting of some of the surviving manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters, compiled by four friars, chiefly by Franciscan scholar Micheál Ó Cléirigh, in the early 1600s – a time of political upheaval. The exhibition at Trinty College Dublin is open to the public from today 9th October to 21st December and is part of the Louvian 400 programme. Digitised images of the manuscripts are online. As are the translated texts [especially for those young-Earthers? – Ed]. And there’s a short RTÉ news report available too [RealPlayer file]

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  • Dawkins

    Pete,

    Nice job! Thanks for the heads-up.

    “As are the translated texts [especially for those young-Earthers? – Ed].”

    LOL. Careful now. You risk having Sam using up half the Slugger bandwidth again :0)

  • Cormac

    I remember studying this in History in school – fascinating stuff! Will definitely make the trip in on Saturday.

  • Colm Tom Mhóir

    Ceann des na seoide is tábhachtaí agus is fearr i stair na hÉireann is ea iad, beidh mé féin ag dul ann Dé Sathairn seo chughainn freisin.

  • An Lochlannach

    Beautiful manuscripts. I realise that the Old Script may not have been the most practical font in terms of modern publishing, but when you read the old books you can’t help but regret its passing.

  • gaelgannaire

    A Lochlannaigh,

    http://www.cainteoir.com

    Theres life in the oul dog yit.

  • Cormac

    Might see you there, Colm!

  • Dewi

    Looks fascinating – and the Book of Kells at TCD also. Surprised British didn’t plunder that.

  • páid

    How could the British have done that, Dewi?
    At that time, the English wouldn’t have let ye.
    😉

  • james orr

    Wonder when TCD will open up the 50-odd boxes of first-hand witness accounts of the 1641 massacre and put them online for the world to read?

  • Garibaldy

    James Orr,

    That project is underway even as we speak.

  • Ulster’s my homeland

    Micheál Ó Cléirigh??? or Michael O’Clery???

    Why is his name Orishized?

  • gaelgannaire

    Ulster’s my homeland,

    ‘Orishezed?”

    Micheal Ó Cléirigh was known as such full stop. I am not aware if he could speak any English whatsoever and he certainely was never called Michael!

    Why do you want to anglicise his name? aren’t you just fooling yourself?

  • Ulster’s my homeland

    gaelgannaire-

    Well, his actual name was Tadhg an tSléibhe, then he changed it to Michael O’Clery when he joined the Franciscan Order in Louvain, and these Orish prats have now changed it to Micheál Ó Cléirigh.

    Is Orish a political language? your guess is as good as mine.

  • Dan

    Says the guy referring to the language as “Orish”.
    Oh, you mean OIrish.

    Are you a tool? Your guess is as good as mine.

  • gaelgannaire

    Ulster’s my homeland,

    If you had any knowledge of Gaelic you would realise that Tadhg an tSléibhe is a nickname.

    Micheál Ó Cléirigh was an Ó Cléirigh.

    To suggest that Micheál Ó Cléirigh, one of the four masters didn’t not call himself such and in the 1600s in the west of Ireland called himself Michael O’Clery is really the one of the silliest things The war on knowledge contines.

  • Dawkins

    Gaelgannaire,

    What’s the actual meaning of Tadhg an tSléibhe? I know Tadhg is the Irish form of Tim or suchlike.

  • gaelgannaire

    Dawkins,

    Tadhg an tSléibhe means Tadhg of the mountain.

    I am not sure what Tadhg means of the top of my head, it is not a current noun.

    It is not the Irish form of Tim although Tim et. al. has been used to anglicise it for the sole reason that they both begin with t.

    Tadhg was formerly an extremely popular name, so popular that it became a degrogatry term for the Irish, contributing to its decline.

    It is the basis of the surnames Montague, Tighe, McCaig, McCuaige etc. etc.

    It h

  • Dawkins

    Gaelgannaire,

    Fascinating! So Tadhg is the dirivation of “Taig”?

  • gaelgannaire

    Dawkins,

    Taig is the Ulster pronouncation of Tadhg, the more southern dialects say Tag.

    It is impossible to describe using english spelling to describe the way it is said in Scotland.

  • Dawkins

    Gaelgannaire,

    “It is impossible to describe using english spelling to describe the way it is said in Scotland.”

    I find I can manage it OK if I say it with my mouth full of deepfried Mars bar :0)