Bloggers trusted more than the Media?

Well, in US at least. And it is hardly much of a claim when you look at the figures. Powerline has this chart from the Center for Media Research. Though putting media up against politicians, whose job naturally leads to polarising public opinion is a tad unfair.

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  • Johnny

    Bloggers are part of the media, aren’t they?

  • Mick Fealty

    Well. Yes and no. I take your point. The term is definitely losing its clear edges.

  • Nevin

    Bloggers are more dodgy than the President; now that’s bad!!

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Nevin: “Bloggers are more dodgy than the President; now that’s bad!! ”

    and

    Mick: “Though putting media up against politicians, whose job naturally leads to polarising public opinion is a tad unfair. ”

    In reverse order…

    Mick, pre-Watergate, I might have agreed with you. However, despite doing their job, the unintended results — the resignation of a President, hearings, trials, et. al, has led something unhealthy for the “profession” of journalism — the desire to “change the world,” despite that being a trifle outside the journalist’s remit.

    Somehow, I think something was lost from the days when journalism was more of a trade, with stringers and re-write men to today’s “professionals” such as S. Glass and J. Blair.

    Nevin, the term “blogger” covers a world of sins, from responsible folks like Mick, to the electronic equivalent of the homeless fellow with the sandwichboard sign proclaiming the end fo the world in a slurred voice whilst hinging a hand-bell. Similarly, “the media” covers the national newscast to the local rag.

  • Nevin

    “proclaiming the end fo the world in a slurred voice whilst hinging a hand-bell”

    Surely not Mick after the France-Ireland match 😉

  • gaelgannaire

    But what is blogging anyway?

    Is there a singular thing that everyone is doing which deserves a single title?

    Maybe some bloggers have an agenda to put forward?, maybe some have no friends?, maybe blogging is just better than t.v. / work?

    The print media write to sell newspapers, but the motivation for blogging is not clear to me at all, therefore without that clarity I cannot conceptualise bloggers and blogging in any way that would alow me to see them as a group.

    I use e-mail, am I an emailer?

  • Nevin

    gaelgannaire, blogs are highly varied. I’m part of a family history group; we’ve a private website where we can share files and images and exchange ideas.

    About two months ago I decided to have a go at putting together a blog that would complement the group website and would be accessible by non-members.

    The blog has attracted the attention of politicians, journalists and others interested in the Giant’s Causeway controversy. Just google with Ballyallaght to see why!!

    I’ve also been able to illustrate the debate on Slugger O’Toole through links to the NALIL blog, including items from the archive that paint a broader picture of planning and related problems.

    The row about the visitor’s centre rumbles on:

    The Minister said the area plan was one of the matters she took into consideration before making her announcement on Mr Sweeney’s application.

    “You can’t expect me to tell you what weight I put on all of the matters that came before me until I have reached my final decision,” she emphasised.

    Let’s hope her senior officials and political colleagues have not been witholding information that will leave her with an egg-splattered face. Sadly, the Environment Committee seems pretty inept; the dogs in the street appear more astute.

  • Wilde Rover

    Dread Cthulhu

    “Mick, pre-Watergate, I might have agreed with you. However, despite doing their job, the unintended results—the resignation of a President, hearings, trials, et. al, has led something unhealthy for the “profession” of journalism—the desire to “change the world,” despite that being a trifle outside the journalist’s remit”

    If you are implying that maintaining the status quo is within the media remit then we may be getting close to why 95.6% polled did not trust the media.

    Mick

    Love the headline.

    Images of Blogger and Media at a house party at the wrong end of a fourteen hour bender arguing over who is in better shape to drive to the next party come to mind.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    Wilde Rover: “If you are implying that maintaining the status quo is within the media remit then we may be getting close to why 95.6% polled did not trust the media. ”

    Woodward and Bernstein didn’t set out to change the world, WR. They set out to find the truth of a story and the story changed the world and that subtle distinction makes all the difference.

    The media — specifically the news media, is supposed to provide information, relegating editorials on the editorial page. Answer the who, what, when, where and why, stick to the verifiable facts and let the reader come to their conclusions. The fact that the person supplying you the news is spinning like a top and, in some cases, lying like the proverbial rug, tends to take a bite out of the people’s trust.

    The reason that the media is distrusted is that large media have their own agenda, above and beyond simply selling papers and advertising. Even those outlets like the BBC, which is divorced from the menial needs of the marketplace, is so one-eyed they have to have teams of experts come in to tell them they have an institutional bias.

    While I acknowledge there is pressure in the modern 24/7 new cycle to “get it fast,” that pressure *should* also make getting the story right more of an issue, not less. And “getting it right” should not be secondary to supporting the reporter’s, the editors or the owners political views.