Cynical not sceptical

A telling moment just now during RTÉ’s Late Late Show. With another opinion poll showing the main parties/coalitions neck and neck.. On being asked by host Pat Kenny whether they believed that the political parties seeking their votes would deliver on all or most of the promises they were making in the election campaign.. no-one in the audience raised their hand in the affirmative.

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  • sammaguire

    Not convinced that’s entirely cynicism. Maybe they just wanted to enjoy the show. By putting up your hand to anything you are inviting Pat to ask a few meaningless questions.

  • Pete Baker

    Sam

    It wasn’t the first nor the only question asked.. the other questions did get a response from the audience.

    And it was part of a panel discussion on the election itself.

  • The Dubliner

    Being publicly disrespectful to politicians is the national sport in Ireland. If people were actually cynical in believing that politicians were useless creatures, then they wouldn’t waste their time voting for them. Ergo, it’s an obvious error to read a TV audience hand poll as a definitive statement of what the public believe.

    On the other hand (and despite the above), I’m quite happy to see it as a slap in the face to Enda Kenny and his risible “The Contract for a Better Ireland” wherein he promises not to seek a second term as Taoiseach if he doesn’t keep his word on all of the promises he has made in his contract. Clearly, none of the TV audience think that he will keep his word despite his special pleading with the public to be trusted by them. It could, of course, also mean that none of the audience think he has a hope of becoming Taoiseach.

  • Dubliner, I don’t think that what the audience thought of Enda Kenny’s resignation promise is clear at all.

    They might just as plausibly have thought that he wouldn’t keep all his policy promises and hence would resign. Which seems more realistic anyway, since it would be difficult to say the least for him to seek re-election with this election’s stunt hanging over him.

    At least if we put aside the fact that, if he’s elected, Kenny will presumably be the one who defines what a kept promise looks like.

  • Rory

    Help! I find myself in agreement with Pete. It is indeed cynicism being demonstrated and a healthy cynicism at that and not at all dissimilar to the cynicism exhibited by UK residents aboutt their politicians. Healthy and sane – for who but a deluded individual would continue to believe the promises of a group that constsntly made and constantly failed to deliver on promises?

  • Peter

    I thought the conversation about Pope John Paul’s inability to act against peodos and Mafia style banking in the Vatican was more entertaining, to be honest.

    Oh, and the constant text messages scrolling on screen “John Paul is a Saint, these alegations are from the devil” were quite amusing too

  • Pete Baker

    Not to worry, Rory, we’re not in complete agreement ;o)

    It’s healthy to be sceptical, not cynical.

  • Brian Boru

    Govt expected to collapse today.

  • Rory

    Thank you for the reassurance, Pete and for directing me to yet another maze where that reassurance may be confirmed. Not very reassuring, but I do appreciate the gesture,

  • The Dubliner

    “Dubliner, I don’t think that what the audience thought of Enda Kenny’s resignation promise is clear at all.”

    It was a tongue in cheek comment, but still fair. Enda Kenny has put his gimmick of “My word is my bond” at the centre of his pitch for office. He has assured all that he can be trusted to keep his word. That is the basis for his Contract for a Better Ireland. Now, despite investing so much into selling himself as a man of his word, none of the audience bought his gimmick and believed that he (as a politician) would keep it. It was a slap in the face for him – much more so than any of the other candidates who have not “my word is my bond” the core of their sales pitch.

    “They might just as plausibly have thought that he wouldn’t keep all his policy promises and hence would resign.”

    If they assumed that he would break his word on his promises, then it is logical to assume that they would also assume that he would break his word on his promise to resign. It is, of course, a nonsense gimmick for Kenny to offer resignation as a guarantee of his trustworthiness, since if he can’t be trusted to keep his word on his ‘contract’ then he can’t be trusted to keep his word about his resignation guarantee for breaking his contract, either – thus rendering it null and void.

    “At least if we put aside the fact that, if he’s elected, Kenny will presumably be the one who defines what a kept promise looks like.”

    No, his ‘Contract for a Better Ireland’ pins him down on that definition. The man is a clown.