DUP welcomes Republic’s government investment…

Whatever the blogosphere does (or does not) think, Peter Robinson welcomes the Republic’s spending promises under the new National Development Plan.

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  • Sammy Morse

    Japers! Peace in our time indeed.

    You can say what you like about Peter Robinson but at least he made the trains run on time.

  • Ronan

    Latest NDP announcement – the Narrow Water Bridge!
    I remember this being called for 25 years ago – things really moving now.

    Last Updated: 24/01/2007 19:23
    Funding for massacre site considered

    The scene of an IRA massacre has been earmarked by the Government for a major investment as part of plans to boost the peace process.

    Eighteen British soldiers were killed by a bomb and sniper fire at Narrow Water in Co Down in 1979.

    Minister for Foreign Affairs Dermot Ahern today confirmed that a 14m euro road bridge between Omeath in the Republic and Warrenpoint in Northern Ireland was under consideration.

    The Narrow Water bomb marked an escalation in the IRA’s bombing campaign. On the same day, the terrorists killed Earl Mountbatten of Burma, the Queen’s first cousin, and members of his family off the west coast of Ireland.

    A total of €1.2 billion was announced for cross-border initiatives in yesterday’s National Development Plan (NDP). A further €1 bn could also follow if Northern Ireland power sharing is restored in coming weeks.

    The British Government has pledged an investment package of €60 bn.

    Mr Ahern said: “In the NDP we identified key priorities for joint investment initiatives including improved access for tourism and other opportunities along the Eastern corridor, including links between Co Louth and Co Down.

    “The development of Narrow Water Bridge on the border between Co Louth and Co Down would obviously be an important element of that proposal.”

    Mr Ahern discussed the proposed project with a delegation from the SDLP this morning.

    The NDP also outlines areas to be funded including improving road links, securing energy supplies and developing education links.

    PA

  • roger

    Perhaps Peter Robinson will now call it the ‘Belfast – Dublin road’ rather than the ‘Newry corridor’ as he did when Stormont minister.

  • Interesting to watch Mr Pragmatist embrace the North-South bodies his Party described as being a threat to the Union. Working with Dublin seems so natural to Peter and the boys these days. Defenders or undertakers of the Union?

  • Sammy Morse

    Oh my God, David, those Vichy Unionists are allowing them to build a motorway to Dublin!

    Next thing you know they’ll be forcibly converting Protestants at the point of a pitchfork and sending their children off to Zimbabwe as missionaries.

  • sean

    apparently the DUP do know more than word

    the other one is “GIMMEEEEEEEE”

  • Sammy,

    Sean has your answer.

  • Greeks and gifts, Greeks and gifts.

  • Jill

    Is there no end to the greed of spongers?

  • Yokel

    Children please. the only difference with this cash is that its explictly announced as a single package. Look at past Irish Government money coming in and its no big deal.

  • I Wonder

    How does a proposal to build a bridge at Narrow Water undermine the status of Northern Ireland as part of the UK?
    Answers on a second class stamp…

  • Crataegus

    Hanson

    Greeks and gifts.

    Perhaps, but perhaps also placating the barbarians on your border whilst appealing to a segment of the electorate ahead of an election here and there.

    Personally I prefer, “why look a gift horse in the mouth.” The investment is sensible and benefits both sides of the border.

  • If Spain offered to invest in Gibraltar or Argentina offered to invest in the Falklands do you think the money would be accepted without question?

    Spain and Argentina lay claim to territory which is currently British. Mr Ahern makes no secret of the fact that he would like his country to rule the little part of Britain in which I live.

    There is no such thing as a free lunch in this world.

    I would prefer if the Republic spent the money investigating the allegations of collusion between the Gards and those responsible for murdering 18 soldiers at Narrow Water.

  • Yokel

    I Wonder

    Cos its a Fenian Bridge, made in bright green with tricolor flags hangin from it! It’ll be a toll bridge that you’ll have to pay for in euros only, which will be special ones minted in oxidized copper which’ll look fenian green like City Hall’s dome..You’ll only be able to cross it if you an Irish passport, no Brit ones allowed…..

  • I Wonder

    Still, it’ll save me a 40 minute journey into and out of Newry.

    Worth sacrificing centuries of heritage to avoid several “Are we there yets”? 🙂

  • I Wonder

    Hanson:

    I’m not aware that there was any suspicion of collusion by Garda in the Narrow Water bombings.

    However, I believe that at least 1 of those who carried out that attack has since received his final judgment.

  • I Wonder, take a look at the article on collusion on my site.

  • overhere

    I wonder, Don’t feed the troll

  • pith

    Hanson, In which “little part of Britain” do you live?

  • manichaeism

    Hanson,

    Hate to state the obvious but feel I must!

    You live in the United Kingdom but if you live in Northern Ireland then you don’t live in Britain.

    That’s why it says United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on your passport.

  • DV/Hanson – if we’re talking about Greeks, we could do worse than to quote CP Cafavy’s poem “Waiting for the Barbarians”:

    Why this sudden bewilderment, this confusion?
    How serious people’s faces have become)
    Why are the streets and squares emptying so rapidly,
    Everyone going home lost in thought?

    Because night has fallen and the barbarians haven’t come.
    And some of our men just in from the border say
    There are no barbarians any longer.

    Now what’s going to happen to us without barbarians?
    Those people were a kind of solution.

  • Ziznivy

    It is sensationally stupid and hypocritical for unionists to welcome this money with open arms. It makes border areas, already in thrall to the Republic even less tied to the UK. Functional dual sovereignty is what the DUP are endorsing.

  • Brendan

    As an Irish tax payer, born a rared in Belfast, I’m horrified that the government would give my money away to the North. The Staters argument for the treaty was that the Northern Ireland statelet would never be economically or politically viable. Now that its been proven to be the case why should we subsidise the North unless it’s in the context of a 32 county Republic. Let the brits continue to pay for their own mess. The DUP and UUP should be ashamed of themselves in their attempts to justify it.

  • Yokel

    Ziznivy

    If you mean by border areas the lovely city of Newry, they can have it….

  • páid

    New roads to Derry and Belfast mean easy and quick access to Dublin.
    One could foresee the development of 2 economies in NI: one as is at the moment – UK backwater; and 1 related to ROI, currently in tiger mode.

    So 2 economies to go with 2 identities, 2 loyalties 2 etc…..

  • Yokel

    Brendan

    This is relative. For a start the Republic has been pumping tax payers money into projects up here for some time. When you look at the practicalities of what they are planning to spend its no different from joint projects say between France & Germany for sharing of links and services. The difference is the fanfare.

    They arent doing this for no economic or social return. Sadly, it will be played by both sides up here and by some in the South, including FF, as something to do with the apparent move to Irish unity when in fact it contributes not one cent. It’s capitalism at work.

    Anyway look at the total NDP value, and look at the money for what are the cross border related projects, miniscule.

    If we take the political angle though, given that they do have some kind of input into NI politically only fair for them to cough up though isnt it?

  • Briso

    Great!! A motorway from Derry to Dublin! A motorway from Belfast to Dublin! That’s both sides of the triangle taken care of! Hurrah!!!!

  • Brendan

    Yokel, the Irish Government doesn’t get much if any real input into the North. Neither does the British government other than they appoint the head on the Northern Ireland Office quango. Purely econonmically speaking Northern Ireland would be better off either linked to the Republic, or in the long term going it alone. The current subsidy from London is the greatest threat Unionists face.

    The purse strings are being tightened and the differences in infastructure between North and South are becoming increasingly apparent.

    The only real reason I can think of Irish Euro’s being spent in the North is to make reunification less of a burden. The Germans have barely recovered from it.

  • Weren’t the Dupes the ones who continually for decades complained about the fenians accepting the Queens Shilling while not being loyal to said Queen? How’s does sit with their complaints about the Shinners accepting an office in Westminster and not accept a seat at parliament. Something here is amiss. Those who virtuously uphold the british sovereignty seem to have gone a little hypocritical. What happened to the days of Never, NEVer, NEVER.!!?!!?

    Is this another example of principles being jettisoned in favour of the ‘filthy lucre’?

    ‘The Punt’ was always suspicious!

    Brisco wrote “ Great!! A motorway from Derry to Dublin! …” I don’t know the route you take………. but now that Carrickmacross is sorted they’ll have to get C’blaney and Monaghan town bypassed.

    Is there a memorial at Warrenpoint and what’s it like… huge thing or not?

  • manichaeism, if we’re going to “state the obvious” consider the following: I am governed by a British Parliament, ruled over by a British Queen, use the British pound and I live in the British Isles.

  • I know some nationalists who think they are .. mis-governed by a British Parliament, ruled over / lorded over in a triumphalist manner by a British Queen’s loyalist subjects, sometimes use the British pound sometimes the Euro and they live in the British mis-managed area of Ireland. There’s also the matter of the British govrn being involved in state sponsored terrorism a la O’Loan report.

    Regardless Hanson, what is your point?

  • take me to the bridge

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/6298663.stm

    There is a simple memorial at Narrow Water..poppies.

  • Billy Pilgrim

    Hanson

    “I am governed by a British Parliament, ruled over by a British Queen, use the British pound and I live in the British Isles.”

    None of which contradicts the indisputable fact that if you live in Northern Ireland, you don’t live in Britain.

    (Though you quite rightly point out how unsatisfactory and illogical the noun “British” is when used to refer to NI. “British” means “of Britain”. It is simple fact of geography that Northern Ireland is not “of Britain” – except in the old, now-unfashionable colonial sense of possession. Of course the fact that there is no noun for that which is of the UK is itself telling.)

  • pith

    Hanson,

    You are not governed by a Parliament, you are not ruled over by a British Queen (person or potato, if you live in Northern Ireland then you do not live in Britain, and you use the pound sterling issued by the Bank of England and mimicked by Northern Ireland banks. Well done on the British Isles bit.

  • Yokel on Jan 25, 2007 @ 10:13 AM wrote “Children please. the only difference with this cash is that its explictly announced as a single package. Look at past Irish Government money coming in and its no big deal. “

    Yoke, you may as well dream here as in bed. If the money wasn’t so important then why was it so fundamentally linked to sovereignty previously by those principled folk who are now accepting the Euro?

    The Dupes had 40 years of crying about fenians accepting the Queens Shilling now you want us to accept that they are only taking Dublin’s Euros at it’s face value, financial aspects only, no strings attached. The expression ‘you having a laugh’ comes to mind.

    Drogheda and Dundalk are part of the Dublin conurbation. House prices in Newry and other greener areas of NI have increased hugely in the last few year in some part due to the Celtic Tiger. The border is becoming obsolete especially so regarding economic aspects. “The Republic of Greater Irel” (to borrow an obnoxious term from the near neighbours) stretches half way up Armagh and Down, takes in Ferm and Tyrone, all of Derry city, a lot of co. Derry and half of Belfast.

  • manichaeism

    Ok Hanson,

    I’ve considered all those things but you still don’t live in Britain. In case you hadn’t noticed Britain is the big island to your east.

  • take me to the bridge on Jan 25, 2007 @ 03:19 PM wrote “There is a simple memorial at Narrow Water..poppies. “

    the reason I ask is … with increased north south traffic I wonder will some (southerners) do a DarthRumsfeld ?

  • lurker

    Hanson, the little part of Ireland that you live in is not in Britain no matter what you were taught in school.

    From the British Embassy:

    Q. What is the difference between the United Kingdom and Great Britain?
    A. The United Kingdom is made up of the countries of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Its full name is “The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”. Great Britain on the other hand, comprises only England, Scotland and Wales.

  • take me to the bridge

    I would go further and whilst agreeing with much of what has been stated vis-a-vis the status of the 6 north eastern counties of Ireland and that they are no more British than French or Hungarian what i would say is that they do not constitute a country as a constituent part of the UK as currently constituted.

    At best it is a current region of the uk and an ex region of the pre-partition Ireland and soon to be a region of the post partition Ireland.

  • Dr Strangelove

    Yokel – “If you mean by border areas the lovely city of Newry, they can have it…. ”

    I travelled through Newry a couple of weeks ago for the first time in years and was quite impressed, with its imposing Victorian and Georgian properties, it looked clean and there was quite a buzz. The attractions of using it for a base to commute to Dublin are fairly obvious.

    It is definitely a lot better than some other shitholes in the North that I can thing of.

  • Dr Strangelove

    thing of ?

    Try think of … even

  • Bill

    England and Scotland are the only countries in the Uk. Wales is a province and Northern Ireland is a …. ?

  • Reader

    Bill: Wales is a province and Northern Ireland is a ….
    Province. But I thought Wales was a principality?

  • DK

    Yes, Newry has improved a lot – I remember it being a total dump. But the same could be said of other towns, e.g. Coleraine which is nowhere near the border. It’s all part of the overall increase in prosperity in NI since the end of the troubles.

  • bumpkin

    “I travelled through Newry a couple of weeks ago for the first time in years and was quite impressed, with its imposing Victorian and Georgian properties, it looked clean and there was quite a buzz. The attractions of using it for a base to commute to Dublin are fairly obvious”

    Lol as a resident of Newry i assume you travelled “through newry” via the bypass.

    It looked clean and there was quote a buzz – you cant be serious man, Newry is one of the dirtiest towns i know, a filfthy kip if there was one. Sunday morning in newry is like walking thru a landfill site tbh.

    Water street esp hasnt been painted in years a real eye sore. Monaghan street –> crumbling ruins & always seems to have more car polluion for some unknown reason. Or maybe you were talking about the beautiful site where north Sreet flats once stood, right where all visitors to the town can see it ?? – right up there with sydney opera house innit ?. I suppose i cant b too hard, things have improved, the travellers site has been removed from besides the quays shopping centre, and the canal doesnt seem to smell as much these last few years.

    And Where are the “imposing Victorian and Georgian properties” in Newry ???

    Sounds like you had an LSD trip while going over the bypass imho.

    Hillsborough – now *theres* a nice town.

  • Sean

    Hmm the dirtiest city I have ever seen was Belfast, mind you i have never been to Newry.

  • insane

    anonymous – “Drogheda and Dundalk are part of the Dublin conurbation”

    “A conurbation is an urban area comprising a number of cities, towns and villages which, through population growth and expansion, have physically merged to form one continuous built up area”

    note *one continuous built up area*

    the greater london area is from memory (ie may be incorrect) what about 30 miles accross, so dublin is much bigger ??????

    Please explain your stupid statement

  • George

    Insane,
    conurbation is incorrect. Drogheda and Dundalk are part of the Dublin commuter belt, however.

  • eranu

    dirtiest city in ireland eh? it would have to be ‘dirty dublin’ !! 🙂

  • take me to the pub

    TMTTB – “they do not constitute a country as a constituent part of the UK as currently constituted”

    what waffle is this ???????

  • BonarLaw

    lurker

    “the little part of Ireland …”

    But “Ireland” is the name of the republic to the south of which we are not part (or have I missed something).

    See here

  • George

    Bonar,
    Ireland is an island but Ireland is not an island state.

  • BonarLaw

    George

    Very good! So simulatneously Northern Ireland is and is not a part of Ireland.

  • Ziznivy

    “England and Scotland are the only countries in the Uk. Wales is a province and Northern Ireland is a …. ”

    Wee Country!

  • insane on Jan 26, 2007 @ 02:37 PM wrote “Please explain your stupid statement “

    my sincerest apologies but as rightly pointed out by George (thanks) I’d used the incorrect word. However I feel the gist and meaning of my posting came across correctly and could be understood. Now that the grammatic (or should I say the urban distinction) side to things have been cleared up by George would you like to add ANYTHING WORTHWHILE or remain a nit picking knocker.

  • George

    Bonar,
    I’m glad you appreciate it.

    Nothing easier in life than being all things to all men.

  • Yoda

    Simultaneously Ireland and not Ireland, but still not Britain.

  • BonarLaw

    Yoda

    But still British!

  • Yoda

    Partially unionist, certainly.

  • Sean

    eranu

    Wouldnt know havent been to Dublin either

    But the whole of northern Ireland is fairly rife with trash blowing in the breeze

  • Jill

    Northern Ireland (sic) cannot be a province as it contains only .666 of Ulster.

  • BonarLaw

    Jill

    So Germany cannot be Germany because it only contains 70% of what was Germay in 1918?

    So Poland cannot be Poland because it only contains 50% of what was Poland in 1939?

    When France lose Alsace Lorraine in 1871 it somehow was no longer France?

    Has Ulster ever been larger than nine counties? If so did it cease to be “Ulster” when it shrank?

    And while we are at it what actually defines “Ulster” as nine counties? I’d love to know.

  • kensei

    “And while we are at it what actually defines “Ulster” as nine counties? I’d love to know.”

    Well, the accepted definition over a changing area generally settled down over the course of a few centuries. Consensus of course plays a role.

    Remind me again, how many counties did the Ulster Convenant referred to? How many was it signed in?

  • BonarLaw

    kensei

    so there is no actual legal definition then?

    Unlike, say, the name of Londonderry.

  • kensei

    “so there is no actual legal definition then?

    Unlike, say, the name of Londonderry. ”

    I don’t know enough about it to be sure, but I would be surprised if there are any legal definitions floating about now, as the provinces haven’t been in use for sometime. The generally accepted definitions are well estbalished, and I suggest you try any good encylopedia or atlas if you are unsure.

    So, yeah, use whatever definition you like if it makes you feel better for shafting the Prods of the other 3 counties of Ulster. Out of interest, which province do Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal fall into then? Which, say, rugby club is reprsenting them at the moment?

  • George

    Bonarlaw,
    of course there is no legal definition for Ulster because it isn’t a legal entity.

    It’s a bit like the British Isles in that respect.

    Northern Ireland is a legal entity but legally it isn’t Ulster.

    It is up to people to decide by usage what constitutes Ulster, or the British Isles for that matter.

    Hence in Irish atlases, the British Isles now excludes Ireland but in British ones it is still included.

    I have yet to see a British or Irish atlas that excludes Donegal, Monaghan and Cavan from Ulster.

    So as things stand, there is no real row over what constitutes Ulster except with you, it seems.

    We shall see though. Things could change over time if you can get together a movement to reduce Ulster to six counties.

  • BonarLaw

    George

    who’s having a row?

    kensei

    “which province do Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal fall into then?”

    As you say “the provinces haven’t been in use for sometime” so what does it matter? They were part of the old Euro constituency of “Connaught/ Ulster” if that is of any help.

  • kensei

    “As you say “the provinces haven’t been in use for sometime” so what does it matter?”

    They haven’t been in government use for sometime. A number of organisations still use them.

    “They were part of the old Euro constituency of “Connaught/ Ulster” if that is of any help.”

    So that would be, a combination of the bits that were in Connaught and the bits that were in Ulster – in other words Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal then?
    FFS.

  • BonarLaw

    kensei

    language.

    I’m just interested in how important nomenclature is. Unionists tend to equate NI with “Ulster” much to the annoyance of nationalists. Why the annoyance? Ulster doesn’t seem to be a legally defined area and provinces aren’t “in use” so why does this unionist habit cause offence?

    The state which comprises 5/6 of the island calls itself “Ireland” which is geographically incorrect but only a minority of unionists take exception and fewer take offence. If, as dev said, Ireland is Ireland without the north then surely Ulster is Ulster without Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal?

    BTW the Euro constituency is now “North West”- an uncontraversial name if I ever saw one:)

  • George

    Bonar,
    on Dev, Ireland to him included the north. Don’t forget the old Articles two and three.

    Ireland the legal entity encompasses the 26 counties.
    Ireland the geographical entity encompasses 32 counties.

    Ulster the legal entity doesn’t exist.
    Ulster the geographical entity encompasses 9 counties.

    Does anyone in Ireland consider Donegal to not be in Ulster? Do you?

  • kensei

    “I’m just interested in how important nomenclature is. Unionists tend to equate NI with “Ulster” much to the annoyance of nationalists. Why the annoyance? Ulster doesn’t seem to be a legally defined area and provinces aren’t “in use” so why does this unionist habit cause offence?”

    Ulster is currently in use by several sporting organisations, not least the GAA. Unionist love using “Ulster” because it suggests the six have some deeper history that made it totally separate from the rest of the island (indeed they tried to change the name of NI to Ulster, IRC). This would gets up Nationalism’s nose even if was the full 9 counties, nevermind 6 separated against the wishes of the majority of the island. The fact that you would have not found a man on the island, Unionist or not, who would have claimed Cavan, Monagahan and Donegal weren’t in Ulster just adds to the annoyance.

    “The state which comprises 5/6 of the island calls itself “Ireland” which is geographically incorrect but only a minority of unionists take exception and fewer take offence. If, as dev said, Ireland is Ireland without the north then surely Ulster is Ulster without Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal?”

    When the Constitution was written, the old Articles 2 and 3 were still in place, so it was pretty clear that it was referring to the entire island.

  • kensei

    “The fact that you would have not found a man on the island, Unionist or not, who would have claimed Cavan, Monagahan and Donegal weren’t in Ulster just adds to the annoyance.”

    should be

    “The fact that you would have not found a man on the island, Unionist or not, who would have claimed Cavan, Monagahan and Donegal weren’t in Ulster prior to partition just adds to the annoyance.

  • M

    I would like to point out that I am antivince!

  • sue

    NI is a sponge!