Has-been loyalists’ quest for notoriety ensures their ridicule…

THERE has always been a strong link between the media and Northern Irish terrorism – a kind of propaganda of the deed, if you will. But when the terror campaign ends, just what does the egotistical loyalist who loved to bask in the public spotlight do? In last night’s MacIntyre’s Underworld: Mad Dog, convicted loyalist terrorist Johnny Adair seemed to cut a lonely, rather pathetic, abandoned figure in a much-hyped show in which the reporter claimed to avoid making any kind of judgment on his subject. ‘Mad Dog’s’ main competition for publicity right now is his former cellmate, Michael Stone, who single-handedly tried to bomb the Assembly on Friday. Barney Rowan wrote that it “was a play for publicity, a desperate and dangerous performance by a man whose cause is fame and whose fear is that he might become irrelevant”. Rowan also suggested that Stone wanted to go back to jail, and by breakfast time, there will be little doubt that this is exactly what this abject, humiliated and contradictory character craved.