Dingle disappears, soon to reappear?

On the eve of a plebiscite, the good burghers of Daingain, formerly good burghers of Dingle look like they may swing it back again tomorrow. The last word lies with the Minister, but if the result is decisive enough, a compromised change may be inevitable. Hmmm… is there a lesson for others attempting to return place names to the ‘genuine original’?

  • seabhac siulach

    They should go ahead and change the signs back to the mickey-mouse meaningless English name…the joke will be on them when they are then cut out of the Gaeltacht (and the juicy grants that go with that designation). A town with a sign in English cannot be part of the the official Gaeltacht. It would merely, I suppose, be a recognition of the reality…not much Irish being spoken amid the smug English/Irish/German, etc. new-age hippy throng there…
    BTW, the actual Irish speakers to the West of Dingle are quite happy with the Irish form of the name, and it is only the largely English speaking townies of that Elizabethan town that are agin it.

    And what is that nonsense in the piece about foreigners not being able to understand the Irish language signs? (All the tourist maps have already been updated) Doesn’t reveal a very high regard for the intelligence of foreigners…and is a typical example of the cultural inferiority cringe, i.e., we should ditch our culture if it make foreigners at all uncomfortable. Sad…

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    To add to the farcical nature of the Dingle/Daingean Uí Chúis proposition, the result of which will be announced tomorrow (Friday) at around lunch time, is the misspelling of Daingean Uí Chúis on the voting paper. 

    Daingean Uí Chúis i s spelt on the ballot paper, a legal document, which has to be signed by the voter (with God knows what implications for the secrecy of the ballot) as Daingean úi Chúis.  Perhaps you didn’t notice that – the fada in Uí is over the ‘u’ instead of the ‘i’.  Needless to say, if Kerry County Council can’t get the name of the town right on the ballot paper, we’re in for more incorrect spellings on signage throughout the county and the country.

    According to the 26 County Attorney General, the plebiscite has no legal import and it’s moral impact is greatly diluted by the intimidation by the ‘yes’ camp of the 1200 voters who have a right to vote in the referendum.

    It’s a pity that the entire “Dingle” campaign has been fuelled by ignorance and shoneenism of the worst order.

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    For the sake of the record Mick and for no other reason – the name of the town at the moment is An Daingean.

  • idunnomeself

    ss,
    what do Irish speakers actually call it when they are speaking Irish?

    This is an obvious example of why strong, compulsive attempts to promote minority languages centrally can backfire so spectacularly, and why i am nervous about this ‘language act’ thing

  • Yokel

    Let the people of the area in question decide….their choice.

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    An Daingean is what they call it, from West Kerry to Cork to Waterford to Dublin, Belfast, Derry, Donegal, Galway and all points in between. It was always called An Daingean – Daingean Uí Chúis is a derivative of that as it refers to a Hussey (by name) who was a land lord or somesuch in the town a few centuries ago but An Daingean predates that again.

    And Dingle never comes into the picture.

    The naming of An Daingean as Dingle, by the way, IDM, is a prime example of what you say about compulsive language measures backfire.

    There’s no one compelling anybody to call Dingle An Daingean except in official documents it will be referred to as An Daingean that’s all.

  • Yokel

    Let the people of the area in question decide.

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    Let the people in the area decide – not just the townspeople….perhaps, that would be better.

  • Its only reasonable for a Gaeltacht town to have an Irish name. However, its a major tactical mistake to impose the wrong name and then try and pretend it is the right one.

    From Steve MacDonogh’s book, the Dingle Peninsula:

    The proper name for the town is Daingean Uí Chúis, O’Cush’s fortress. The fact that there is no record of the name O’Cush has led to a suggestion that the name is a corruption of Hussey, or Huysse, a Flemish family which came to the area in the thirteenth century. In a document of 1290 the name of the town is given as Dengynhuysse.

  • Chris Donnelly

    Hmmm… is there a lesson for others attempting to return place names to the ‘genuine original’?

    In short, Mick, nope.

    Objections to ‘Londonderry’ are on quite different grounds to that of Dingle/An Daingean. A comparison would be if attempts were being made to change the name to ‘Doire’. ‘Derry’ is already the most commonly used name of the city- just ask the Apprentice Boys.

  • smcgiff

    ‘There’s no one compelling anybody to call Dingle An Daingean except in official documents it will be referred to as An Daingean that’s all.’

    And Maps

    And Signposts

    Will nobody think of the poor dollar and Euro wielding tourists!

  • Brian Boru

    I think both names should be official. We are never going to return (imho) to being a monolingual Irish-speaking country again, but I would entertain hopes we can be a bilingual one with the roaring-demand for Gaelscoileanna that is already a welcome feature of Irish life. It should also be remembered Dingle is an international brandname for the place and therefore important for tourism. Minister O’Cuiv was hamfisted in imposing this. It’s the kind of authoritarian approach that stokes resentment of the language.

  • smcgiff

    Well said, Brian Boru,

    And as for O’Cuiv, he can’t even get his own name right. If Dingle can’t be in the Gaeltacht, then O’Cuiv shouldn’t be allowed to be Minister for Gaeltacht Affairs what with his angloised name. PAH!

  • Brendan

    They can have as many votes as they want. The grandson of Eamon DeValera is not up for a debate.
    Now please find something more interesting to talk about in the coffe shops of An Daingean, like what will you do when Fungi the dolphin dies. Or how can you attract tourists with your gouging prices for food, beer and B&B’s. With no dolphin and no tourists, it might be the richness of the Irish culture that saves ye.

  • smcgiff

    ‘The grandson of Eamon DeValera is not up for a debate.’

    vote the bugger out.

    ‘what will you do when Fungi the dolphin dies’

    Replace him with Fungi mark 7.

    ‘Or how can you attract tourists with your gouging prices for food, beer and B&B’s.’

    Well, you’ve got a point there. I’ll starve before I buy another meal in Dingle again.

  • Brendan

    ‘vote the bugger out.’
    Not an option. The best thing that all Fianna Fail TD’s have going for them is their opposition. Only the permanently angry/mental will vote for the Blueshirts and Stickies. People with ‘I shot JR’ stickers on their huge Nissan jeeps for example.

    ‘Fungi mark 7’ is not allowed under new EU dolphin regulations, its the wrong shape and colour. How long do dolphins live anyway ? The fecker might well outlive me !

  • Mick Fealty

    Chris,

    Briefly. I’ve got to take the dogs out, and spend some quality time away from the laptop.

    As most here know, I love the language. It’s so deeply ingrained in the English place names around Ulster that I often see/hear the Irish original where only English is signed.

    I’ve argued, many times, that some aspects of speaking the language should be zero sum. Take our (too infrequent) Irish language threads for instance. Translations are both impractical and undesirable if there is to be a space that Irish speakers can exercise their ‘tongues’. At the same, I’ve also been struck by the high levels of trust amongst our unionist readers, most of whom rarely find it pass-remarkable.

    But there is an issue here around meaning (and tokenism perhaps). The fact that the plebiscite is to take place demonstrates that there are meaningful attachments to names whether they are in Irish or English. However late the name change the draftsman’s pen it cannot immediately eradicate those accrued meanings.

    In the Kerry case, there’s probably enough popular support to overturn a ministerial position through plebiscite. In Derry, the democratic majority seems intent on abolishing the official name for the ‘original city’, regardless of its collective meaning for a substantive minority. In my experience, few Unionists pretend they don’t call it Derry in casual conversation.

    But sending it in its entirety to the official trash can, perhaps, it only sends a message about who now owns the whole place, and its history.

    The result of both will revolve around who is in the majority. In which case if it happens in Derry, it is not likely to be reversible as is likely to be the case in Kerry.

    Which is surely at the very least something of a paradox?

  • “How long do dolphins live anyway ?”

    40-50 years is max for a bottle nose. Fungi is around 25yrs I think.

  • Chris Donnelly

    But sending it in its entirety to the official trash can, perhaps, it only sends a message about who now owns the whole place, and its history.

    Mick

    Which is why the latest proposal from within the nationalist community – articulated by Mitchel McLaughlin- will involve retaining the name for a specified geographic district within the city.

    I’ve been struck by how unionists have resorted to the defence of claiming to be a beleagured minority on this issue, using the entire issue to suggest nationalists are seeking to ‘lord it’ over unionists and eradicate their identity.

    Such an argument would carry much more weight were the practices of unionist majorities not so clearly known to most contributors to this site.

    As I pointed out on FD’s original thread on the Derry name change last week, the issue coincides with Lisburn and Antrim’s unionist majority councillors pushing through proposals to erect union flags in local communities in their boroughs, including the middle of a majority nationalist village.

    If we are going to address the serious matter of public expression of culture and identity, then there needs to be a quite frank discussion on where we start.

    Is it from a position of equal rights for both communities- in which case, are we to see the Irish national flag hoisted alongside the union flag across the north?

    On the Derry name change issue, Government agencies could have taken the heat out of this issue a long time ago if they had’ve displayed sensitivity on the matter and even used the two names interchangeably. Instead, official policy – including from the BBC- is to refer to the city as Londonderry in the first incidence on all occasions.

  • Yokel

    Derry/Londonderry is easy..split the place in two..and while we are at it theres no reason the west bank should be allowed to join ROI.The West Bank unionists can just move.

    As regards Dingle let the people from the area decide..their choice and people with vested interests from outside the area stop trying to rig it.

    Local democracy..real simple.

  • Nic

    The owner of my local curry house says he doesn’t care much for Mumbai instead of Bombay. Says everyone grew up calling it Bombay and it’s still Bombay to him, the rest is blather from self-important, navel-gazing, inferiority-complex, not-colonialists-any-more-asserting twits. Those aren’t his exact words, but I’m pretty sure I caught the sense of it.

    1. Irish place names are in the main anglicisations of the old gaelic. (aside: Dublin = dubh linn, so why is it Baile Atha Cliath in Irish? On second thought, don’t answer that, we haven’t got all night). So just gaelicise Dingel to “dinchel” or whatever? Just a thought.

    2. Didn’t Tom Griffin above just explain that the original name of the town(ship) was Dengynhuysse?
    Better still, I wonder what the original settlers 10 000 years ago called it? If you want to restore the original name, then why not go the whole hog? Or are we willing to admit that times and generations change and with it the names of places? It’ll probably have a Brazilian or Polish name in a hundred years from now, so what?

  • D’Oracle

    Cad mar gheall air Londondingle ?

  • Mick Fealty

    Chris,

    Sorry if I’m asking for what’s already been shared here before, but have you got a link to Mitchel’s piece and/or the proposal?

    Is there really any consonance between the flags issue in Lisburn and the upholding/disposal of Londonderry? Surely flags are of national, rather than local meaning. And, presumably, whatever is decided over names in the North West we might expect to endure any possible future transition of sovereignty.

    Although the British government will have the final say over whether the change takes place or not,in the end only local people will determine (and to some extent be judged by) the quality of the solution at which they finally arrive.

    So taking it briefly back to Dingle/An Daingain, ‘meaning’ in these matters is clearly intensely personal. And it is not always enough to pare something back to what you imagine is the original and ‘let natural justice be done’.

  • DK

    Am I right in that this plebiscite is to remove the innacurate term An Daingean and replace it with the accurate (although see tom Griffin’s post above) term of Daingean Ui Chuis along with the original term of Dingle. Sounds grand – you have both names instead of one sloppy translation. As long as both “Dingle” and “Daingean Ui Chuis” are on the sign, no-one is going to get lost. Why can’t that be done? – it is everywhere else.

  • Nic
    “Better still, I wonder what the original settlers 10 000 years ago called it?”

    Don’t think there was much happening in Dingle/An Daingean/Daingean Uí Chúis 10k years ago.

  • Mark

    Mick,

    From your own archives………

    http://www.sluggerotoole.com/index.php/weblog/comments/d_day_for_derry_to_be_december_6th/

    Though Chris’ link seems dead. You can get the IN piece here

    http://www.irishnews.com/access/archive/story.asp?SID=534363

    (if you don’t pay the sub drop me a mail)

  • páid

    Like the Cock in Gethsemane, thrice has Yokel cried out on this thread. His point remains unanswered…

    Yes Yokel, when you boil it all down, the people of An Daingean have the right to name their own town. Names are important, very important. They are manifestations of identity, the driver of most comments on this site.

    Just as I am Páid, and yokel is yokel, and circles is circles, Dingle must be Dingle.

    In my dealings with the folk of Dingle, in word spoken and written, I will respect their decision.

    Amongst my friends however, and muintir Chorca Dhuibhne, I will side with O’Donovan, who wrote, if memory serves me correctly, that ‘the aborigines of the area know the town by no other name than An Daingean’

    There you have it.

    Authenticity.

    Beats a “brand” every day in my book.

  • Nic,

    “If you want to restore the original name, then why not go the whole hog?”

    It’s not a question of restoring the original name, it’s an issue of having an official name in the Irish language for a town in the Gaeltacht

  • smcgiff

    ‘the aborigines of the area know the town by no other name than An Daingean’

    except it’s the locals that may very well vote for it to be called Dingle. I’m guessing the 1200 eligible to vote are pretty local.

    ‘Beats a “brand” every day in my book.’

    It may boil down to the bribe that if the vote for Dingle they’ll lose gaeltacht grants.

    It may very well mean a “grant” being worth more than a “brand”.

  • Droch_Bhuachaill

    Nic
    “Better still, I wonder what the original settlers 10 000 years ago called it?”

    Cuan an Dair Deirg (Red Oak Bay)

    By the way, An Daingean is what we’ve called it down here in the Gaeltacht for generations. O Cúiv’s placenames order is just a cementing of that fact into law. I know that Dingle shouldn’t be in the Gaeltacht area as most of the people there don’t speak Irish in their daily lives. Hopefully this vote will fasttrack the town’s exclusion from the Gaeltacht area, as it will be an English speaking town with an English language name.

    Although the pro-Dingle faction recieve most of the media interest, public opinion in the Gaeltacht area outside the town favours the retaining of the Irish version. We should have a say in this vote, as all our services are located in the town and that is where we spend our Euros every week.

  • smcgiff

    ‘Although the pro-Dingle faction recieve most of the media interest, public opinion in the Gaeltacht area outside the town favours the retaining of the Irish version. We should have a say in this vote, as all our services are located in the town and that is where we spend our Euros every week.’

    Why, as you admit, should external Irish speaking visitors impose an Irish name on English speaking RESIDENTS?

    Most locals go to Tralee to do their shopping anyway so as not to pay the tourist rates.

  • Oilibhéar Chromaill

    if the people of An Daingean vote to change their name to Dingle/DAINGEAN úi[sic] Chúis, they will not alone demonstrate their love of their greasy tills but their functional illiteracy.

    But perhaps we should expect no better from post Celtic Tiger Ireland…..

  • Droch_Bhuachaill

    “Most locals go to Tralee to do their shopping anyway so as not to pay the tourist rates.”

    No we don’t, most of us have to use Dingle as our nearest town.

    “Why, as you admit, should external Irish speaking visitors impose an Irish name on English speaking RESIDENTS?”

    Because this is a Gaeltacht question. If the residents of the town decide to leave the Gaeltacht and then choose to use the anglicised form of the name, fine by me. But as they wish to remain in the Gaeltacht AND have an English name, is should be a question for all residents of the Gaeltacht.

  • Yokel

    It’s great having principles when its not your own pocket….

  • I think they should change the name to Tralee. Then we could really confuse the fuck out of the tourists!

  • smcgiff

    “Most locals go to Tralee to do their shopping anyway so as not to pay the tourist rates.”

    That’s the perception of the Kerry locals I know, being married to a woman originally from Stradbally with close relations still living in the Gaeltacht.

    ‘But as they wish to remain in the Gaeltacht AND have an English name, is should be a question for all residents of the Gaeltacht.‘

    Well I resent supporting the Gaeltacht if they don’t want an English speaking person about the place. If ye’re going to be so anal in the Gaeltacht then I see nothing to support, and the Irish language should be left to sink or swim on its own merits without any funding specifically because it’s an Irish speaking area – not from this english speaking person anyway.

    Perhaps we should have a vote nationally whether the predominantly English speaking people should continue to suppor the Gaeltacht with our taxes!!!

    ‘if the people of An Daingean vote to change their name to Dingle/DAINGEAN úi[sic] Chúis, they will not alone demonstrate their love of their greasy tills but their functional illiteracy. ‘

    What’s to love about An Daingean? Why can’t the people living in Dingle not love the name because that’s the name they grew up with!!!

  • smcgiff

    Should have been as below…

    ‘No we don’t, most of us have to use Dingle as our nearest town.’

    That’s the perception of the Kerry locals I know, being married to a woman originally from Stradbally with close relations still living in the Gaeltacht.

  • smcgiff,
    your 10:10 makes a lot of sense but what is the point of a Gaeltacht if most of the people speak English? I thought the idea was to create areas where the language could be spoken as the community language.

  • smcgiff

    Hi Maca,

    Changing the name that is to my mind already Irish by virtue of it being used by Irish people for decades is madness.

    Is Cork less Irish than Corcaigh. I don’t think. To think so would be to think I’m less Irish than a person that can speak Irish. Fuck that for a game of soldiers!

    Keeping a name like Dingle within the Gaeltacht does not demean the Irish language.

    London is an English name. But what does it mean? Should London be anglicised to make it more English?

    It’s madness I tell ya. J

  • True, it’s no less Irish. But I don’t see anything wrong with making the Irish name official in a Gaeltacht area. Visit the Swedish speaking areas of Finland and you’ll find the sign posts showing the Swedish names. I don’t see the problem with this.

  • smcgiff

    Maca,

    I’d be in favour of both names being official. Let the Gaelgoers call it what they like and let the rest call it Dingle.

    Signposts/maps should use both names.

    If the Gaelgoes want to keep it Gaelic only the question is then should singposts in predominantly English only speaking areas outside the Gaeltacht only have the common use names, and not have the Gaelic names included.

    Keeping Dingle as Dingle by no means lessens the Gaeltacht. It didn’t exactly disappear all the years the place was called Dingle now did it?

  • smcgiff
    “I’d be in favour of both names being official”

    Well that’s also what i’d go for now as a compromise just to put the argument to rest.

    “the question is then should singposts in predominantly English only speaking areas outside the Gaeltacht only have the common use names, and not have the Gaelic names included.”

    I don’t agree. I think that is a different issue. The placenames order applies only to Gaeltacht areas. Having Irish signposts outside of Gaeltacht areas is just a reflection of the status of the language as 1st official language. IMO.

    “Keeping Dingle as Dingle by no means lessens the Gaeltacht. ”

    Of course not. But why does Dingle get to live by different rules that other Gaeltacht towns have to abide by? It’s not for any principal that I can see, it’s just for money IMO.

    Gotta dash, chat later.

  • Droch_Bhuachaill

    “Well I resent supporting the Gaeltacht if they don’t want an English speaking person about the place. If ye’re going to be so anal in the Gaeltacht then I see nothing to support, and the Irish language should be left to sink or swim on its own merits without any funding specifically because it’s an Irish speaking area – not from this english speaking person anyway.”

    Where did i say that english speaking people weren’t welcome? If the town wants to remain in the Gaeltacht doesn’t it make sense that it have an Irish Name??

  • Yokel

    Will there be a movie made about this? I think it should.

  • Yokel

    The Gaeltacht is about a language people speak, not a set of road signs…

    Can I ask a number of questions here:

    1-How many of those posting here wishing it to retain a solely Gaelic-Irish name are from teh North? How many from the South?

    2-How many people have visited this town?

    Thanks

  • Droch_Bhuachaill

    UPDATE: Was just walking the streets of the town- people screaming at each other in the streets. A friend of mine screamed at for by the Dingle/Daingean Uí Chúis faction for not wearing one of their cute little stickers. Its madness i tell thee…..

  • George

    Yokel,
    I’m from the south and have visited Dingly Dell and after reading these posts would reluctantly side with Droch_Bhuachaill.

    If Dingle wants be categorised as part of the Gaeltacht then it should live by the same rules as everywhere else.

    If it wants to have an English name for financial reasons etc. fine but they have to accept it has consequences.

    It would be like people on Westminster road in Foxrock, Dublin saying they want to stay in the borough of Dun Laoghaire because “County Dublin” is more upmarket than “Dublin 18” but they don’t want to pay that borough’s bin charge rate.

    The people of Dingle should accept that you can’t cherry pick the agreement as they say up north.

    There are plenty of other places and schemes where the money currently spent on Dingle could be used to help preserve the Irish language.

    Their choice but they should understand that there knock on effects.

  • Oilibhéar Chromaill

    It’s not a question of the ‘Gaelgoes‘ – it’s Gaeilgeoirí actually – wanting to retain the Irish version, which is the legal version, it’s the unaminous cross party support the Official Languages Act received in the Oireachtas, Dáil and Seanad, which means it’s the LAW of the land.

    So if the people of An Daingean want to change their name to Dinglehampton by the sea, then they should not alone be kicked out of the Gaeltach but declare a UDI from the Free State……

  • Yokel

    One answer thanks… i wonder why others are so quiet?

  • Droch_Bhuachaill

    Yokel I’m from the Dingle Peninsula as you can probably tell…..

  • smcgiff

    ‘it’s Gaeilgeoirí actually’

    My day is complete.

    I only wish I had time to respond more fully to the Gaelgoer fascists, but alas I’ve only so much time to contemplate such BS.

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    And now rte are reporting that the people of An Daingean want to change their name to DINGLE Ui CHUIS! See : [a href=“http://www.rte,ie/news”]here[/a]. Then change [&] to < &>.
    Talk about the incompetents being in charge of the asylum….

  • smcgiff

    OC,

    You might want to give another go at the link.

    From what I can see there’s no change on the RTE website news section re Dingle, that they’re waiting for the result.

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    Jeez, I point out that he’s making a simple spelling mistake, so he can correct it, and I get called a ‘Gaelgoer{sic} fascist” for my trouble. Talk about someone who doesn’t like being told he may be wrong. if i apologise for being insufferably right will smcgif sat sorry for calling me a fascist or is it ok to bandy “fascist” around when you’re trying to smear someone for loving his native language?

  • Greenflag

    ‘And, presumably, whatever is decided over names in the North we might expect to endure any possible future transition of sovereignty. ‘

    Newt Emerson has the name change to bate all name changes in the Irish News . No Northern Ireland -No Ulster – just BOB – Belgium on the Bann – with Belfast as New Brussels .

    Newt could have gone further and even given new names for the inhabitants of BOB . Unionists as Phlegmings and Republicans as Wallies or vice versa but alas he did’nt 🙁 The Newt lad is slipping .

    Dingle Bells
    Dingle Bells
    They’re Daingean all the way
    Oh what fun it is to be
    On Portrush strand all day

    Is there ever an end to the *%#@*

    TGIF

  • Shouldn’t it be Dingle ™ or ®.. it being a trade mark and all.

  • smcgiff

    OC,

    I’m protecting my native tongue.

  • Smcgiff

    I assume when you say your native tongue, you are talking about English.

    Now that last time I checked it seems to be doing ok. no need to get worried there. Maybe you shoul Leave the protection of the English language to the English while you’re at it.

  • No need to lose the rag lads, it’s not an issue that needs to divide, and we’re all cairde here surely.

  • smcgiff

    ‘Maybe you shoul Leave the protection of the English language to the English while you’re at it.’

    And you started off so well, but proved my point in your last sentence. My language obviously needs to be protected with people like you around.

    If the faith of Irish is dependent on Dingle being called a derivative of Daingain then you don’t have much faith in it.

  • smcgiff

    Maca,

    You know what you can do with your cairde and other pieces of apparel! 😉

  • smcgiff
    Póg mó thóin :))

  • “My language obviously needs to be protected with people like you around”

    lol, listen to yourself 🙂 English needs no protection. You can relax. really.

    I don’t care what the call An Daingean, I just think its a complete joke that people think that Dingle is such a trademark money maker.. its gas

    Dingle™ abú

  • Yokel

    Damnit, dingle.com and dingle.ie are already taken….

  • smcgiff

    How about Daingain ui whatsit .ie and .com? Could be worth a punt! 🙂

  • Yokel

    Listen smcgiff, I wouldn’t be able to type that in to my browser of the top of my head neer mind any visitors.

    dinglepennisula.ie might work or just plain didyahavetogotodingle.ie

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    I think that you lowered the tone of debatel, Smcgiff, when you started talking about ‘Gaeilgeoir fascists’. Given the fact that this legislation, the Official Languages Act, under which the placenames order was made, was passed with all party support in the Oireachtas, it seems that whoever the fascists are in this debate, it’s not the Gaeilgeoirí.

  • Droch_Bhuachaill

    dinglydonglydouche.com anyone?

  • West cork brit

    Oh, Oliver, I’m soooooooooo sorry:

    Dingle referendum votes 1005 out of an electorate of 1222 in favour of changing the name back to Dingle from An Daingean as it is now officially titled after the Placenames Act of 2004

  • Shuggie Dinny Maggy Neddy Hiúdí Bán McSporran

    Colm Mór

    “Dingle™ abú”

    Very funny.

    The whole argument that “Dingle” is a well-known and recognised “international brand” seems quite a surreal one to me.

    If it’s true I’m going to set up “dingleburgers.jp” and market delicious dolphin burgers, with dingleberries, to the japs.

  • Shuggie Dinny Maggy Neddy Ban McSporran

    West cork brit

    Now that it’s (maybe) official Dingle should cease to be part of the Gaeltacht.

  • smcgiff

    90% vote in favour of An Daingean to Dingle/Daingean Uí Chuis.

    O’Cuiv was on the radio saying that Dingle can’t remain in the name with the current law as it stands and DINGLE to remain in the Gaeltacht.

    Boo Hoo for O’Keeffe.

    For Dingle to remain in the Gaeltacht he’d need to get support from all other Gaeltacht (WHY!!!).

    Does the government ask the people every time they want to change the law?

    The Gaeltacht is a place of privilege, if they wish to whine about small things like the long standing Dingle name remaining then we’d have to look at that privilege.

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    There’s no point in engaging with Smcgiff if he’s going to continue to throw the fascist label around as recklessly as he does.

    As for West Cork Brit, I think the An Daingean referendum is meaningless as it can’t overturn the democratically expressed will of the people of Ireland. Remember: all parties in the Dáil voted for the Official Languages Act and that’s the power which Eamon O Cuív used to make the place names order which was seized upon by a small cabal in An Daingean to grease their tills.

    If the Dáil and Seanad vote to make an exception in the case of An Daingean, then I will recognise “Dingle”. Until then no dice.

  • west cork brit

    First DI, then Gerry sucks the truncheon, now this: try to watch the comfort eating, Oliver. Though I know it’ll be hard. :p

  • Sofi

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