GAA Central Council refuses to act

The GAA’s Central Council has decided not to take any disciplinary action (pdf file) against County Antrim for their breach of GAA rules for allowing the Hunger Strike Rally at Casement Park. For a previous Hunger Strike rally it is believed that County Antrim was fined £15,000 by the Central Council.The Sports Council, who helped fund the redevelopment of Casement, had sought an urgent meeting with the County Antrim Board. It is unknown if this meeting has taken place or what action they plan.

  • Bem u s ed

    Utter disgrace – the good ‘ole boys of bog ball and stick fighting are alive and well. These twats should have their lottery funding withdrawn forthwith.

  • CS Parnell

    Fine, provided we can close down Windsoer while we are at it

  • Padraig Óg

    Yawn yawn

  • Oilibhear Chromaill

    Bem u s ed sounds like a reasonable fellow who doesn’t have any prejudices or any questionable preconceptions.

  • Anna Dale

    Well done Parnell, “the first bout of b1g0tted whataboutery” arrives by the second comment, could well be a record even by Slugger’s plummeting standards.

    A man of your alleged oratorical skills can surely do better than that.
    And “Satan’s Pit” (copyright Daily Ireland) is spelt “Windsor” btw.

    Re the post topic, what’s the point commenting?
    Did anyone really expect any different?

  • Cue the usual begrudgers with their usual bigotted tripe…

    Anyway, poor decision by the GAA IMO. They do seem to have problems disclipining players and/or clubs for various indiscretions, i’d wish they’d start to clamp down a bit or rethink their rules.
    The story in the news yesterdy concerning managers getting paid is a good example – they can’t (and won’t) clamp down on it so why not consider revisiting the rule and finding alternative ways of dealing with the issue? (such as allowing the payment of managers up to a point)

    p.s. Fair Deal, you might add in brackets beside the link to the article that it’s a PDF, people hate surprises.

  • iluvni

    Nothing unexpected in this decision.

    Time for the Sports Council to request their money back.

  • wHat ?

    What on earth has Windsor Park got to do with this, have they ever officially held a UVF celebration in their grounds ???? can peeps please stick to the issue at hand namely the secterian “sporting” dinosaur the GAA. If you want a thread about Windsor Park please ask the administrator. Personally I would proscribe the GAA until such times as they have a clearly non sectarian ethos enshrined in a written constitution. Oh yes and all lottery monies received should be returned fortwith.

  • “what?”
    The GAA is not sectarian, no one is excluded on grounds of religion or race for that matter. If you can prove otherwise please do so.

  • seabhac siulach

    Anna Dale

    “Well done Parnell, “the first bout of b1g0tted whataboutery” arrives by the second comment, could well be a record even by Slugger’s plummeting standards.”

    I think the first bout of b1g0try arrived by the first comment not the second;

    ‘…good ‘ole boys of bog ball and stick fighting…’

    Needlessly offensive to all GAA supporters (all millions of us on this island…). Grow up…

  • You don’t say…

    SF/IRA/GAA 1 Murder Victims 0

  • William Joyce

    Great to see Fair Deal, Slugger’s resident GAA commentator, back in full swing. (soounds like Swinger Fulton that – Billy Wright’s old buddy). I guess we need Romewatch, Jewwatch etc to go with GAAwatch.
    The talk of bogball etc reminds me of Declan Lynch in the Sindo. Lynch used to get off on slagging the GAA, using the same words and praising soccer and such things as Chelsea signing Damian Duff. Lynch thought Duff was a godsend to Chelsea who dumped him. Point is Lynch the slagger knoew fa about soccer either.
    David McWilliams has a good article in today’s Indo about the GAA mums. He says the GAA have won the war of hearts in Ireland’s suburbia and they have relegated the garrsion games to the also ran category. Sure soccer louts will hang about Windsor and dream of George Best and Billy Bighot Bingham but their day has gone.
    As Sinn Fein, of course, want some of that action, it is to be expected they would try hard to get into bed with the most potent organisation on the island of Ireland. But GAA fanatics like Fair Deal should know that Sinn Fein are outnumbered and outgunned there by those who put in the hard work on the ground. The all Ireland was reffed, for example, by a Free State soldier, not by a H Block veteran.
    Sinn Fein showed they were as ignorant of the GAA as Fair Deal by making the H Blcok jersey. Could you imagine the situation in the schoolyard: three guysd with Dub shorts, 4 wqith Ciarrai, 3 with Kilkenny, a few with Chelsea, Inter Milan and Fair Deal with the H Block one.
    Nuzhound has a good article cited by Oliver Hughes, brother of the great Francis Hughes

  • fair_deal

    SS

    “the first bout of b1g0try”

    IIRC Bemused is a nationalist.

    WJ

    Turbo Paul has the H Block jersey

  • Thx Fair Deal.

  • seabhac siulach

    “IIRC Bemused is a nationalist”

    So what…he is clearly b1g0ted against the GAA…in my book bigotry is defined as an intolerance of others and their opinions (whether for political, cultural or religious reasons)…
    It is hardly something restricted to whether someone is a nationalist or not (and there have certainly been many of those…)
    By his comments, he is clearly intolerant of those of us who think of football as Gaelic football and soccer is, well, soccer…

  • nmc

    I love it when people start complaining about money because of this. Why do you think you have the right to deny funding? Because it’s republican, (not sectarian, Republican – the message from Gerry that day was that we were to be “avowedly anti-sectarian”)? So where does that leave the tens of millions pissed away policing the Loyalist community when they don’t get to lord it up and march through somewhere that the locals don’t want them? Should there be a whip to refund the money?

  • CS parnell

    Actually, my comment was by way of saying so what rather than “thems uns are as bad”.

    I am pretty clear about my views on SF – bunch of gangsters and crooks. But if we are going to close down on sports grounds being used for sectarian purposes, let’s do the job properly.

    Plus I hate Casement park because I used to go there with school and it was a site of perpetual humiliation.

    Truth is, the North of Ireland is full of bigots and stroke politicians. You deserve one another.

    Laugh of the day is the APNI press release which says they’d rather have lower rates bills than living people. Pathetic.

  • Anna Dale

    SS
    “Needlessly offensive to all GAA supporters (all millions of us on this island…). Grow up”

    And the adult response you think is to answer with a mirrored b1gotted “whatabout”?

    With the honourable exception of maca that the rest of the GAA/Republican supporters on this thread have made no comment on the actual decision.

    All agree that the GAA got it right here then?
    Can we look forward to more Central Committee approved Provo Commemorations ?

  • POL

    Annadale
    Well done Parnell, “the first bout of b1g0tted whataboutery” arrives by the second comment, could well be a record even by Slugger’s plummeting standards.

    Right on the button as usual.You must have totally missed the first post lol.

  • POL

    What on earth has Windsor Park got to do with this, have they ever officially held a UVF celebration in their grounds ????

    Every time they play.

  • nmc

    Anna Dale,

    I think the GAA got it wrong by voicing concerns that they were not prepared to act on. Either put up or shut up as they say. It makes no difference to me where the rememberance takes place, just so long as it does take place. The Central Council did not approve any Provo/INLA commemerations, hence this thread…

  • carlosblancos

    This is no surprise. While permitting the demonstration to go ahead was a disgrace, which set the GAA back year wrt community reconciliation, there was no way Central Council could fine anyone given they’d known about it for months and did nothing. To fine would have been hypocrisy.

  • Bem us e d

    Sorry folks – I’m not a Nationalist. I’m a Republican (in the French rather than the Ardoyne sense of the word).

  • independant

    I think one thing we ALL can agree on is that due to the volume and extreme threads GAA posts create on this board, it is certainly a highly contraversial orgainisation.

  • fair_deal

    my apologies for my misrepresentation bemused

  • The World’s Gone Mad

    POL
    “What on earth has Windsor Park got to do with this, have they ever officially held a UVF celebration in their grounds ????

    Every time they play. ”

    Who exactly is ‘they’?

  • Setanta

    Fair Deal

    Your title “GAA Central Council refuses to act” implies some sort of beligerence on the part of the GAA which does not seem to be obvious in ther report.

    Are you sure you’re not just trying to stir?

  • brendan,belfast

    The only decision they could have come to; the right decision; the decision i told you all would be arrived at about three months ago.

    The Shinners got the punishment, symbolic though it was, because the Shinners abused the GAA in Antrim. The matter should end there and let the GAA get on with what it does – provide a healthy, positive, fair and inclusive sporting environment for hundreds of thousands of us across Ireland.

  • billy

    Windsor Park has been used to host sectarian orange order functions, both the ground & the social club.

  • William Joyce

    Reading Fair Deal on the GAA reminds me of Johnny Adair’s quip about Catholics. When a Catholic reporter asked him if she was the first Catholic to be in her car, he quipped that others, usually bound and gagged andon a one way trip to the hereafter, had been there before. One thinks of the UVF guys who spied on GAA officials with the objective of kidnapping, torturing and killing them. Their involvement with the GAA is destructive, often fatal. But the GAA, like Catholic, Nationalist Ireland, will get the last laugh as the remnants of Empire slide irrevocably into the dustbin of history.

  • john burns

    Anyone in any doubt that the GAA is a sectarian organisation should read the comments of William Joyce above. “Victory to Catholic, Gaelic Ireland” is Gerry’s cry too. That’s what its always been about. The Catholic Church, The GAA and Sinn Fein, Ireland’s holy trinity.

    Any Protestant who plays for the GAA must be an uncle Tom.

  • John, I didn’t realise William Joyce is official spokesperson & policy writer for the GAA. Oh no wait … he’s not!

  • Hurler on the Ditch

    Groan…

    Degenerated to the usual guff….

    Personally think it was a shame the GAA didn’t take some action. Question now is whether they’ll be tested on this again as they’ll be percieved as soft on the issue. Poor start for Brennan.

  • Anna Dale

    “Right on the button as usual.You must have totally missed the first post lol”

    POL
    Please check the definition of “whataboutery” and then read my comment again.
    “as usual”? I comment on here once in a blue moon, when I read idiotic utterance like your second one and “billy”‘s above, I remember why.

    nmc
    “I think the GAA got it wrong by voicing concerns that they were not prepared to act on”

    The concerns related to an *alleged* breaking of their rules. If you and they are saying there wasn’t a breaking of the rules, it seems to me that by only *punishing* SF and not Antrim GAA, then poor Gerry & Co are being unfairly victimised for no reason 😉

  • Hugo ‘George Osborne’ Rudd

    Bloody good reason not to pay money into the GAA coffers. Excellent reason to oppose their receipt of Lottery Funding, with the exception of youth sporting initiatives.

    But, it seems the decision was teaken by the correct channels, and will have to be respected. I’d sooner have events like this taking place in GAA grounds than on the streets of the city, as I believe was the opinion of the PSNI at the time.

  • john burns

    Maca,

    He may not be the offical spokesman but I bet he speaks for most of them. Offical speak has to sound reasonable and moderate but beneath the surface …..

  • Conor

    Should have never allowed the ceromoney to take place there. They’ve shot themselves in the foot when they could have proved what most of us already know, that 95% of the GAA lost interest in Irish politics a long, long time ago.

    How many GAA members in the South do you reckon vote for Sinn Fein? But we have people on here talking crap about unholy trinities and other nakedly hostile rheteoric.

    A fellow posters comments about some Gaelic Catholic nationalist conspiracy involving the GAA exists only in his head. And only serves to give ammo to people dumb enough to be taken in by it.

  • Conor

    Apologies for the poor editing. Couldn’t a feature be added so you edit your own posts?

  • The World’s Gone Mad

    I’d imagine there were many GAA-supporters who would think that William Joyce is a prat.

    Just as there were many GAA-supporters who voiced their dismay and objection at the time to the Casement rally, here on Slugger and elsewhere.

  • John East Belfast

    maca

    “The GAA is not sectarian, no one is excluded on grounds of religion or race for that matter. If you can prove otherwise please do so.”

    come of it maca !

    I am a County Antrim Protestant and this decision by County Antrim GAA and the inability of the Central Council to enforce any form of discipline would make me seriously uncomfortable anywhere near a County Antrim facility.

    Are you going to tell me that any sporting organisation should make Protestants feel that way ?

    It is a form of Constructive Discrimination just as would be the case in the work place if an employee felt the need to leave their place of employment because of a sectarian environment there.

    ie a work place could be full of people whistling the sash, wearing Rangers shirts and have logos to the UVF around the wall. Not one thing might be said to the lone Catholic there but do/did you expect them to stay there ?

    The Law and Employers recoginised years ago that such environments were unacceptable but the GAA are still in another Century.

    – unless they dont want Protestants or Unionists ? – in which case they should clearly say so and stop pretending to be just a sporting orgainisation.

    They cant have it both ways – they are one or the other and cant be both.

    They had a superb opportunity to prove they were sporting only and make an example of those who pervert that.

    They were unable or unwilling to do so – mixture of complicity and lack of balls

    Shame on the GAA.

    As for Alex Atwood – what is he on ? – Antrim GAA have learned their lesson ?

    ie do what you want and ignore the wishes of the rest of the GAA without sanction.

  • nmc

    j.b.

    it’s usually best to at least attempt to deal in facts, as opposed to your opinion, or what you are inclined to “bet” on.

  • John Burns
    “He may not be the offical spokesman but I bet he speaks for most of them”

    Wrong. William speaks for William and William alone, no one else.

  • George

    John burns,
    and on what do you place this bet? Are you a member? Do you associate with the GAA? Have you any dealings with the organisation? Have you done surveys?

    David McWilliams in today’s Irish Independent seems to think very differently:

    “So Ireland is left with a hyper-educated, assertive, clever, ambitious and aspirational phalanx of “GAA mums”. Although you see them at soccer and hockey clubs, the GAA is where the Irish equivalent of American “soccer moms” congregates.

    Interestingly in suburban Ireland, the GAA is winning the battle for the hearts and minds of the new middle class. Mothers who never had any dealings with the GAA, either as children or young women, are signing up their kids and getting involved in the GAA over and above other sports.

    Today’s GAA mums are a very different breed to those who used to make the sandwiches years ago….

    Politically, GAA mums are tolerant and liberal without being left-wing or agitating.

    While the political system has not twigged their importance just yet, it’s clear that most advertisers have.

    FOR example, where I live, Cuala, the local GAA team, not the local rugby team is sponsored by the quintessential middle class estate agent , Sherry FitzGerald.

    Twenty years ago, the rugby team with its professional sheepskin-wearing, hipflask-swilling supporters would have had no competition in the sponsorship field. Today – thanks to GAA mums – the GAA is where the cash is….”

    Who do you think is closer to the truth, David or you?

    Article: http://www.unison.ie/irish_independent/stories.php3?ca=36&si=1699542&issue_id=14722

  • JEB
    I full accept that such events would make you feel uncomfortable joining your local GAA. But your analogy is flawed because the GAA is not full of rebel song whistling, celtic shirt wearing lads with IRA logos all over the walls [come down here and i’ll prove it to you], and I personally don’t know of the existence of any GAA club like that.
    You have issues with the GAA … fine, but don’t try and paint a false picture of the organisation when you obviously don’t know as much about it as you think.

  • Anna Dale

    Conor
    “How many GAA members in the South do you reckon vote for Sinn Fein?”

    I think this along with David McWilliam’s article above points to an important difference in attitudes between the GAA in parts of NI and in the ROI

    “Politically, GAA mums are tolerant and liberal without being left-wing or agitating.” may well be true”

    May well be true in ROI, haven’t seen much evidence of this in NI.

  • circles

    Can’t beleve that people are still rising to this topic.
    Come off it now- this is a piece of old tat that some people can’t resist banging on about. Its really of no consequence one way or another compared to the bigger picture.
    Did this event force its way through a unionist area? Did it take place in front of a unionist housin estate? Were any unionist noses rubbed into anything? If you weren’t there, you wouldn’t even have to take any notice – so lets get back to more important topics please.

  • CS Parnell

    Actually, circles is mostly right. the real story here is the retelling of the “war” by republicans.

    To replace all the dead bodies they and their co-thinkers (in the sense that violence works) of the UVF et al produced, they have the corpses of 10 martyrs.

    They have to be venerated and the history – especially the bits about how some right wing thugs took over and destroyed the civil rights campaign and the broad alliance built up around it by opportunistically seizing on the actions of the state to start off their sectarian war – rewritten.

    Focus on that and not want people did in Casement.

  • William Joyce

    The GAA moms rally to the GAA because the GAA has seen off the challenge of the garrison games. They essentially parasite on the commitment of GAA “volunteers” down the years. Many African and other schoolboy immigrants now play GAA as part of the community package.
    The Black North is different. The Unionist hardliners, as can be seen here, hate things Irish. Even the title of this thread reflects the hard line Paisley speak that underlines these people. Still , as long as they are posting here, they are not out targetting GAA officials or Polish immigrants or Pinoy nurses.

    Incidentaly, I am not a spokesperson for the GAA. That is the job of Danny Lynch who has, on more than one occasion, had to refer to GAA members murdered by the sectarian Protestant supremacists of North East Ulster. Lest we forget.

  • Democratic

    Does anybody know what this recent spate of republican-leaning trolls in the last few days is all about? – Are we coming up to an another marked anniversary of some “important” historical event or other perchance? –
    Here’s hoping that proper online debates get back to their usual standard ASAP without any blatant stirrers of either hue!

  • No Dozer

    Maybe someone from the GAA should get in touch with P. O’Neil as the provos have now disbanded (apparently)there is a lot of surplus money doing nothing. I mean surely Croke Park could do with a few extra seats.

  • Patrique

    The GAA hierarchy consists of a number of Southern Irish men who still have that old quilty feeling about “abandoning” the North in 1922, those who were labelled “Free Staters” for years. These people are afraid to act against anyone in the North for fear of being called “Free Staters” and for fear of being accused of abandoning the North all over again.

    I have said before 98% of the GAA family are ordinary people, with no prejudices. Unfortunately the Belfast GAA and little pockets elsewhere were taken over by the Provies, who still have some influence.

    As a fervant GAA player, supporter and all the rest, I was hoping that Antrim would be suspended for a couple of years. That’s the only way to tackle this problem, not by burying the collective southern Irish head in the sand.

    Real GAA people have one prejudice I must confess. They detest Glasgow Celtic and would love to see all Celtic jersies banned from GAA grounds.

    Well, no-ones perfect.

  • Patrique, should we thank you for your sweeping generalizations?

    As a GAA man you have offered only your sole opinion rathar than that of the organization yet you feel you can describe to all, the basis for the decisions made by the heirarchy and the reason behind their decisions… you keep your crystal ball busy.

    The GAA allowed the Sam trophy to visit Celtic Park… hardly a sign of your mentioned detestation. Many of Scotland’s GAA clubs have direct, definate and overlapping links with Celtic. Watch you don’t bite that hand that feeds!

    Try backing up your feeble postings with some facts.

    Please, please, please tell me what county you’re from ?

    Ath Cliath abu

  • austin

    Oh pity you poor desperate posters having to fall back on this tired old story rather than talking about the real story of the day-the vindication of the IRA in today’s IMC report.

    As the IMC report gives you no opportunity to ‘taig-bash’ let’s clutch at straws and put the boot into the GAA/IRA/Sinn Fein on this one.

    Isn’t it great to see how the disciplined approach of the IRA is depriving the usual suspects of the usual excuses

    In the meantime any of you want to talk about Sir Reg and his ongoing alliance with the PUP/UVF and the latter’s widely-attributed involvement in the Tobermore murder?

  • austin

    obviously not

  • Patrique

    I do not think any GAA members were in the UVF, bar Billy Wright, so the above post is largely irrelevant, two wrongs do not make a right and all that.

    As for the post from the Dub, I was talking about hard core West Belfast GAA men when I said the bit about detesting Celtic, and especially Celtic jersies. At a recent funeral, when the subject was mentioned, for once not by me, out of 40 males at the funeral, 39 agreed about banning the jersies. As a mini Gallup poll, pretty convincing.

    Quite often when a club match is on, players do not turn up because there is a Celtic match on the TV. For the Johnny come lately Irishman in the North the greatest display of Irishness is to wear a Scottish football jersey. The REAL GAA man, which is what I was talking about, cannot abide this. We watch soccer, support soccer clubs, but the GAA comes first. Liverpool V Chelsea, Arsenal V Man Utd, Mayo V Kerry all on the one day. Who won the soccer matches?

    At a time when we are trying to move on, getting grants from local councils, loads of TV coverage and all the rest, we get a massive backward step such as this demo at Casement. Now the Councils are chasing us, and Glasgow Celtic are not feeding us either.

    I actually went to school in Casement Park. I have close ties and affinity to the place, perhaps this is what annoys me most. Even more than Celtic jersies.

    The GAA needs to stand up to Sinn Fein.

  • William Joyce

    The GAA has a very healthy dose of Gardai and Fre State soldiers and officers. The second most senior oficer in the Free State army was a noted GAA inter county player, as was his son, anotehr Free State officer.
    This thread is like something Willie Frazer would produce. It displays the same bile and I am sure Willie would like to cover it in his rantings.
    As Sinn Fein is the largest politicval party in the 6 cos, it makes sense their members and suporters would be involved in the GAA.
    As they are social climbers on the make, it makes sense they would try to hijack elements of the GAA. Their hunger strike jersey was an obvious flop and if Gerry knew anything about sport, he would know that.
    One wonders how strong GAA football is in West Belfast. One imagines the clubs are more sheebeens that centres of sporting excellence.

  • austin

    ‘One wonders how strong GAA football is in West Belfast. One imagines the clubs are more sheebeens that centres of sporting excellence.’

    Yeah keep usind that vivid imagination WJ

    -Better that than actually going near the pariahs and finding out for yourself.

  • pacman

    I note the earlier calls in this thread for the lottery funding to be taken back. If we follow that logic, shouldn’t the powers that be then ban the GAA from having anything to do with the new national (supposedly) sports stadium?

    Of course that would mean that there would be no cross community aspect and would therefore (I expect) place the whole project in jeapordy. Damned GAA – can’t live with them and can’t live without them!

  • O’Donnell

    The GAA bashers on this thread are missing the point. The GAA HQ wanted to punish Antrim, and they have no love for SF, but as Antrim officials were able to produce a long list of southern GAA facilities that were used for FF, FG, PD and Labor events, they couldn’t lay down a punishment.

    That would have caused a potential split as the Antrim GAA and shinners could start crying of discrimination and this would create a mess.

    Solution
    The GAA should not allow any political meetings to being held on GAA grounds- both north and south of the border.

  • Patrique

    For Mr Joyce’s information, one of those “shebeens” from West Belfast reached the All Ireland club final this year, beaten by a point after not performing. A neighbouring “shebeen” reached the All Ireland club hurling final in 1989, a mighty feat given that all of the strongholds are located in the South.

    Another neighbouring “shebeen” reached the club football final in 1977. Obviously the first mentioned, beaten in this year’s final, are the reigning Ulster champions.

  • willowfield

    NMC

    I love it when people start complaining about money because of this. Why do you think you have the right to deny funding? Because it’s republican, (not sectarian, Republican – the message from Gerry that day was that we were to be “avowedly anti-sectarian”)?

    Well, if Adams says they’re not sectarian, then they couldn’t possibly be sectarian! An ethnic nationalist killing machine, guilty of nearly 2,000 murders: sectarian? No way!

    The members of GAA Central Council should hang their heads in shame.

  • willowfield

    MACA

    The GAA is not sectarian, no one is excluded on grounds of religion or race for that matter. If you can prove otherwise please do so.

    Not a unionist about the place. Unionists excluded.

    But that’s OK, maca, that’s not sectarian, as long as you don’t exclude people on grounds of “religion or race”. Right? (And never mind the fact that, in NI, by and large, unionist = Protestant).

  • willowfield

    William Joyce is correct insofar as, traditionally, GAA was never particular popular in Belfast. Football was always the most popular sport, both in terms of playing and supporting, and even after the demise of Belfast Celtic.

    Things may be different now with the recent rise of extreme nationalism, and with Provisional SF actively involved in promoting GAA (“ourselves alone”) rather than football.

    The same was true in Londonderry city – always a football city and not a big GAA place. Again, things may have changed recently.

  • willowfield

    Above comments relate to RC parts of the city. Obviously in Protestant districts, football remains king.

  • George

    Willowfield,
    unionism is a political ideology not a religious one. You can’t get around that, I’m afraid. Doesn’t matter how many Protestants you have convinced.

    As for excluded, do you know of unionists who are interested in celebrating their Irish culture with their fellow countrymen and women rather than their British one?

    They had 50 years of total control in Northern Ireland to set the cultural agenda and what did they do?

    Perhaps they could set up their own GAA, a sort of British GAA equivalent of Rugby League if they feel excluded?

    Also, the GAA, which has built up 6 billion in assets while others twiddled their thumbs, has too much work on its plate helping Irish society to hang its head in “shame”.

  • William Joyce

    Willowfield
    1. I spoke of West Belfast being weak at football (GAA), not hurling, where Antrim have been ok, given everything. Antrim last shone in GAA (football) in hte 1950s, when they introduced the dreaded handpass.
    2. Patrique: I stand over the sheebeen remark. Belfast is a drinker’s paradise and the GAA are, unfortunatley, part of that crap.
    3. If individual GAA clubs (football) excel, it is like Eire Og of Carlow and Clans of Lurgan in the dark old days. Individual effort, not a concerted campaign.
    4. Willowfield: Even when speaking on a GAA thread started by Fair Deal, the resident GAA correspondent, why do you insist on calling Association Football (soccer) football? This is insulting nmot only to the majority of Irish people, where GAA rules but also to Austrlaian and American posters where other brands of football rule. Please try to abandon your blinkers.

  • Patrique

    A couple of points, Willowfield. Most of the 2,000 you quote as killed by the Ira would be Catholic, if you check the statistics, so I suppose this could make them sectarian.

    Derry as a garrison town, like Sligo and Waterford, were soccer towns. “Nationalist” Belfast has always been GAA. The dominant teams, O’Connells in the 1940s, Rossa in the 1950s, St Johns in the 1960s, 70s and 80s, along with St Galls, and St Pauls to an extent in the 1990s, and now St Galls, are all from West Belfast. The untapped potential in the area is immense.If Antrim ever reached an All Ireland final, there is no stadium in the world that could accomodate the Belfast support, let alone the rest of the county and the other team.
    But surely you were aware of the history of these clubs?

  • willowfield

    GEORGE

    unionism is a political ideology not a religious one. You can’t get around that, I’m afraid. Doesn’t matter how many Protestants you have convinced.

    Generally speaking, the unionist community is ethnically separate from Irish nationalists. Religion is one dividing characterisic. Political and national aspiration is another. Excluding an ethnic group is sectarian, whether it’s done on the basis of religion or of creating political barriers is of little consequence. The effect is the same.

    As for excluded, do you know of unionists who are interested in celebrating their Irish culture with their fellow countrymen and women rather than their British one?

    Yes.

    They had 50 years of total control in Northern Ireland to set the cultural agenda and what did they do?

    I take it you are trying to mount a defence of GAA exclusion of unionists? There was discrimination during the Stormont era, therefore it’s right that the GAA should exclude unionists?

    Perhaps they could set up their own GAA, a sort of British GAA equivalent of Rugby League if they feel excluded?

    Or perhaps the GAA could ditch its political baggage and open itself up to everyone in Ireland?

    Also, the GAA, which has built up 6 billion in assets while others twiddled their thumbs, has too much work on its plate helping Irish society to hang its head in “shame”.

    Ridiculous comment. The amount of work or otherwise that the GAA needs to do is not relevant to this issue.

    Shame on the GAA Central Council.

    WILLIAM JOYCE

    I spoke of West Belfast being weak at football (GAA), not hurling, where Antrim have been ok, given everything. Antrim last shone in GAA (football) in hte 1950s, when they introduced the dreaded handpass.

    Antrim’s hurling prowess comes from the Glens, not Belfast. Hurling is very much a minority interest in Belfast.

    Willowfield: Even when speaking on a GAA thread started by Fair Deal, the resident GAA correspondent, why do you insist on calling Association Football (soccer) football?

    Because that is what it is. And that is what it is called.

    This is insulting nmot only to the majority of Irish people, where GAA rules but also to Austrlaian and American posters where other brands of football rule. Please try to abandon your blinkers.

    Please try not to be so insular. Football is a global game. The other codes are mere local peculiarities. It is the local codes that require the descriptor.

    PATRIQUE

    Derry as a garrison town, like Sligo and Waterford, were soccer towns. “Nationalist” Belfast has always been GAA. The dominant teams, O’Connells in the 1940s, Rossa in the 1950s, St Johns in the 1960s, 70s and 80s, along with St Galls, and St Pauls to an extent in the 1990s, and now St Galls, are all from West Belfast.

    Interesting about Waterford. But you are wrong about Belfast: it has not “always been GAA”. Football has always been the number 1 sport among nationalists in Belfast. As I say, though, it may be different now.

    And the fact that there are GAA teams in west Belfast does not mean that it is the number 1 sport! That’s a very silly argument. There are football teams in rural Tyrone, but that doesn’t mean football is more popular than GAA.

  • Frustrated Democrat

    To be pedantic:-

    Rugby Football’s first club was formed in 1839, Dublin University Football Club was formed in 1854, Australian rules was around 1854 as well and American football was in formed in an early stage around 1874

    The Football Association was formed in 1863 to unite a game that had been played since the early 1700’s,

    The GAA was formed in 1884.

    So I think the GAA has little claim to the word ‘football’ on its own since of the major football games played in the world it was last to be formed and does not even use the word in its official name. If one was to give it to a specific game it would probably go to Rugby as the first code to be offically formed or to The Football Association as perhaps the oldest form of football.

    In International terms Football (FIFA style) is by far the biggest game played of any of them and is internationally recognised as ‘football’ around the world. The rest are in reality different varieties such as Rugby, Australian, American and Gaelic.

  • George

    Willowfield,
    “Generally speaking, the unionist community is ethnically separate from Irish nationalists”

    Doesn’t mean that unionism isn’t a political ideology. My grandad was born and bred a Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) unionist and a Protestant, does that make me “ethnically” unionist? Does that make me ethnically Protestant for that matter? Or ethnically British? Here was me thinking I was Irish and from Dublin.

    “I take it you are trying to mount a defence of GAA exclusion of unionists? There was discrimination during the Stormont era, therefore it’s right that the GAA should exclude unionists?”

    No, I’m asking you if unionists are/were so interested in an Irish cultural agenda why didn’t they do anything in all those decades when they ran the show?

    It has nothing to do with discrimination against Irish culture by unionism, it has to do with why they weren’t interested. They had all the money and power to do what they wanted culturally.

    “Or perhaps the GAA could ditch its political baggage and open itself up to everyone in Ireland.”

    Being proud of Irish people determining their own fate isn’t baggage, it’s democracy. Being probably the most successful amateur sporting organisation in the world isn’t baggage.

    Perhaps unionists could ditch their “political baggage” and open themselves up to everyone in Ireland. Or do unionists not have any baggage?

  • willowfield

    Doesn’t mean that unionism isn’t a political ideology.

    Nobody said it did. The point was irrelevant.

    My grandad was born and bred a Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) unionist and a Protestant, does that make me “ethnically” unionist? Does that make me ethnically Protestant for that matter? Or ethnically British? Here was me thinking I was Irish and from Dublin.

    You are what you are, George. Your identity is entirely up to you.

    No, I’m asking you if unionists are/were so interested in an Irish cultural agenda why didn’t they do anything in all those decades when they ran the show?

    Such as? Culture of any description was never a major issue for government in NI.

    It has nothing to do with discrimination against Irish culture by unionism, it has to do with why they weren’t interested. They had all the money and power to do what they wanted culturally.

    So because unionist politicians “didn’t do” whatever it is you think they ought to have done in the period up to 1972, that justifies the exclusion of the unionist community by the GAA?

    I’m afraid I don’t follow!

    Being proud of Irish people determining their own fate isn’t baggage, it’s democracy. Being probably the most successful amateur sporting organisation in the world isn’t baggage.

    No-one said it was. Another irrelevant comment.

    The point remains that the GAA ought to ditch its political baggage and open itself up to everyone in Ireland. I see no reason why not, other than ethnic chauvinism or sectarian solidarity, neither of which are valid, in my view.

    Perhaps unionists could ditch their “political baggage” and open themselves up to everyone in Ireland. Or do unionists not have any baggage?

    Not sure what this means, nor what its relevance is. How do unionists “open themselves up to everyone in Ireland”, and what has this got to do with the GAA?

  • George

    Willowfield,

    as I amn’t going to get a straight answer from you I thought I would cross reference your views here with those you are espousing on the British Isles thread.

    Here you say unionists are “ethnically separate”?
    while there you say we are culturally indistinguishable.

    Sorry man, I can’t discuss in depth when you’re arguing polar opposites at the same time.

    Oiche mhaith.

  • willowfield

    Nice avoidance of the issue.

    Why don’t you just accept that there is no valid reason for the GAA to exclude the unionist community?

    The other discussion is on the other thread.

  • willowfield

    Not arguing “polar opposites”. In the British Isles, we are largely culturally indistinguishable. We just choose to emphasise those relatively minor things that make us feel different from one another, rather than the huge amount that we have in common.

    It’s not a difficult point to grasp.

  • William Joyce

    Frustrated Democrat: You defend Association footballs’ imperialistic designs by citing the case of Tyrone and GAA. Now if GAA football is the main game in Nationalist Tyrone, then it deserves to be called football, as in Lewt’s go kick ball, play football etc. Soccer should be called Assocation football or soccer. It is am inority in the island of Ireland and gets leess success than Gaelic or rugby, so why should it get the preeminent default position?
    Maybev it is an age thing but I associated St John’s with hurling not with football. (I call it football as it is in a GAA sense/framework)

    Anyway, GAA won the hearts and minds highground in Ireland. The rugby people are mature enough to coexist and cooperate on occasions but the soccer dregs…..

    Sligo, Waterford and Athlone do make interesting examples with their garrison history. However, the main factor has been the dedication of GAA members. Armagh and Crossmaglen Rangers are cases in point. But so too are all teams, clubs and counties.

  • David

    Anna Dale

    Personally I don’t agree with the rally or the GAA decision.

    However, like many Catholics, I’m old enough to remember the IFA pumping hundreds of thousands of taxpayers pounds into Windsor park while Linfield indulged in a blatently sectarian no Catholic signing policy for decades.

    Billy was quite correct in his earlier point that Windsor Park has hosted Orange Order events in the ground and social club. Silly me – the OO which bans Catholics from joining, members from being related to Catholics or attending Catholic services (even funerals) is not sectarian.

    However, the GAA which has no such rules is sectarian.

    I accept that the IFA have made major efforts to sort out sectarianism at NI matches in the last 4 years (since the disgraceful Neil Lennon incident). However, for many years prior to this they ignored (in fact encouraged) the openly sectarian anti-Catholic ethos of the NI supporters.

    So I’m afraid that the allegation of sectarianism aimed at the GAA from a lot of posters on this thread is pure hypocrisy. I am in agreement with people who are against any and all sectarianism.

    I won’t be lectured by hypocrites who are quite prepared to accept a sectarian policy when it suits them.

  • Frustrated Democrat

    William Joyce

    What you call something in a minor corner of Ulster is hardly of much significance in a world of 6 billion people where to most football is football FIFA style.

    In that world you should refer to Gaelic Football to avoid confusion, what you call it on your doorstep is entirely up to you.

    BTW I am not a football fan just pedantic

  • William Joyce

    Frustrated: If you do not refer to Gaelic football as football as football in a GAA community, or American football as football in an American context or Ossie rules football as football/footie in an Australian copntext, then you are not pedantic; you are just an ignoramus. Association football is a minority sport in many areas of the world, not just little ocrners of nationalist Tyrone you so dearly want to despise.

    Let’s face it, some people do not want to be embraced by the GAA. They want to destroy and emasculate it, with pedantry in one hand and the UVF in the other.

    The fact thst you are not a soccer player/fan is also revealing. In that, you remind me of the clowns who write op eds on Gaelic and soccer, subjects on which they know nothing, in the Sindo. Their excellent GAA, soccer and rugby correspondents would not do it. A pity this site has not a more well informed GAA correspondent than Fair Deal.

  • Anna Dale

    David,

    I’m not quite sure why you addressed you comment at me; regarding your points,

    “Personally I don’t agree with the rally or the GAA decision.”

    Fair enough, make your opinion known to the Central Committee.

    “Billy was quite correct in his earlier point that Windsor Park has hosted Orange Order events in the ground and social club. Silly me – the OO which bans Catholics from joining, members from being related to Catholics or attending Catholic services (even funerals) is not sectarian.”

    Unfortunately now you’re indulging in “whataboutery” like billy. Do you automatically assume because I criticise the GAA that I will endorse sectarianism in other sports?

    “I accept that the IFA have made major efforts to sort out sectarianism at NI matches in the last 4 years (since the disgraceful Neil Lennon incident).”

    The fight against sectarianism predates the Lennon incident and involved not only the IFA but also a fair chunk of the NI support. Without a large number of ordinary supporters taking the initiative then the programmes such as FFA wouldn’t have reaped the rewards that they did.

    “However, for many years prior to this they ignored (in fact encouraged) the openly sectarian anti-Catholic ethos of the NI supporters.”

    They “encouraged” it, how?
    All Northern Ireland supporters possessed this “openly sectarian anti-Catholic ethos” did they? I think you need to qualify that sweeping statement.

    “I am in agreement with people who are against any and all sectarianism.”

    Good. You will then appreciate the good work presently being done within the NI support.

    “I won’t be lectured by hypocrites who are quite prepared to accept a sectarian policy when it suits them.”

    The GAA will continue whatever Unionists think about it, in fact I doubt very much whether you or the vast majority of GAA fans really give two hoots what we think about your organisation. But it’s up to you to decide whether this episode and others like it have strengethened or weakened the GAA, if you do disapprove then make your collective voice known.

  • nmc

    Willowfield

    Well, if Adams says they’re not sectarian, then they couldn’t possibly be sectarian! An ethnic nationalist killing machine, guilty of nearly 2,000 murders: sectarian? No way!

    No, he said at the rally that we, the Republican community, (many of whom are not in any paramilitary group, believe it or not), were to be avowedly anti-sectarian. Not the GAA or the RA but the public. I’m assuming that you are not accusing the Republican general public of being guilty of being an ethnic nationalist killing machine, guilty of nearly 2,000 murders. I personally have never killed anything larger than a spider. You see the big ones you get these days? Where’d they come from?

  • William Joyce

    Anna Dale: You are right in saying that the GAA will continue to thrive despite provocative threads like this. The days of banning Sunday sport are gone just as eventually the Unionist culture will go back to where it belongs, with Johnny Adair on the other side of the Irish sea.

    And when the Unionists are broken, then all sports might be able to thrive. That will never happen when Jewwatch, GAAwatch, Romewatch and the like thrive in the 6 cos and on the Net.

  • Tochais Siorai

    WJ, perhaps you should troll somewhere else.

  • William Joyce

    All sports include the NFL. Perhaps the Orange couchers should make the American change it to ANFL. But that would sound like the Antrim National Front League.

  • Democratic

    I see the trolling continues – starve it out folks!
    The line about the Murdering Protestant Supremacists of the North East on page 2 was enough for me to be honest – I am surprised to moderators are not editing this type of thing – It is in no way contributing to debate and surely contradicts the supposedly sacrosanct “man not ball” rule.

  • The World’s Gone Mad

    William Joyce
    ‘why do you insist on calling Association Football (soccer) football? This is insulting nmot only to the majority of Irish people, where GAA rules but also to Austrlaian and American posters where other brands of football rule’

    You know little about Australian sport so probably best to keep quiet. Association football is not referred to as soccer any more in Australia – the organisation that runs it is called the Football Federation of Australia. The current Australian champions are Sydney FC, the runners-up are called Adelaide United FC (have a guess what the FC stands for William, come on even you can work it out). Admittedly, the national team is still called the Socceroos but the Australians do have a penchant for silly sporting nicknames. Its laughable to suggest that Australians are insulted by calling soccer football, but then they don’t have the baggage that someone like you obviously brings to the discussion.

    By the way, of 45-English speaking national organisations in FIFA, only the US, Samoa and Canada use ‘soccer’ in their name. Its even, shock horror, the ‘Football’ Association of Ireland. Football is football – billions of people around the world call it that. Don’t flatter yourself that people call it football just to piss you off.

    ‘If you do not refer to Gaelic football as football as football in a GAA community, or American football as football in an American context or Ossie rules football as football/footie in an Australian copntext, then you are not pedantic; you are just an ignoramus. Association football is a minority sport in many areas of the world, not just little ocrners of nationalist Tyrone you so dearly want to despise’

    In your posts, you come across as a little Irelander. I can only think of the following places where a non-Association version of football is the national game:
    USA, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific Islands (I’m sure there are other places but these are the only ones that spring to mind)
    Its arguable that football isn’t even the national game in the US. In Canada, while not the national game, Canadian football is more popular than Association. In Australia, the national football team is currently more popular than either the Wallabies or the Kangaroos.
    Association football is the national sport in almost all of South-America, Africa, Europe and Asia.

    Do not get me wrong – this is not to denigrate the GAA which is by-and-large a great organisation with, in most places, a wonderful ethos. But you sound like a parochial fool when complaining about people calling ‘soccer’ ‘football’.

  • Willow
    “Not a unionist about the place. Unionists excluded.”

    Unionist is not an ethnicity, dah!

    You’re a detractor and a begrudger who has zero interest in the GAA. As I said before, I won’t waste further time discussing the subject with people like you.

  • darth rumsfeld

    This thread has been a bit less depressing than the usual GAA threads only because of the various differing views of who is the purest nationalist.

    I can’t agree totally with Willow that we are excluded from Gaelic sports, but it’s undeniable that there is minimal Unionist interest in the sports.Even if Carson brought hurling to Trinity.

    It reminds me of the legendary brother Forbes McLoyalist’s comment in “Only an Excuse”- “We in the No surrender F*** the Pope True Blues Rangers Supporters’ Club are a non-sectarian club. it’s just for some strange reason no Kafflick has ever wanted to join”.

    Which begs the question- if you really want Unionists to join, spectate, participate, what are you doing to encourage them? Let’s look at another body that couldn’t attract people from one section of the community- the RUC. What did it do? The name and crest had to change- some would say the entire ethos. This caused great pain to those who were comfortable to the status quo- as did the preferential treatment given to those candidates from a nationalist background.

    So- when are all our nationalist fellow irishmen going to open up a dialogue with Unionism about getting us involved in the games? Why no token effort, like Bhoys against B1gotry, or Rangers’Pride over Prejudice? Too comfortable with the status quo? Safer playing to one’s own crowd ? Cos you have to do something- even the orange order has met Archbishop brady

  • Darth
    “So- when are all our nationalist fellow irishmen going to open up a dialogue with Unionism about getting us involved in the games?”

    There are many GAA people more that willing to open up dialogue with unionists willing to actually discuss the subject but as you see from this thread and others there are many unionists who like nothing more than taking the opportunity to insult the GAA and it’s members. These people have no interest in ever joining the GAA.

    To address your question anyway. The problems as I see it are 1. the difference in the GAA North & South i.e. what the organisation means to members/supports in these two jurisdictions; 2. a GAA leadership who don’t want/aren’t able to tackle the issue for whatever reason; 3. what does the GAA need to change, sure we all have a good idea of the big issues but some unionists complain about the smallest little things that it’s clear they have no interest is seeing the GAA become more inclusive

    And btw, you don’t need to be in the GAA to play hurling or football. Part of the problem [that’s probably be a bit unfair] exists within the protestant community. I know there are some people who would like to try the sports but is it even safe to puck around a sliotar in all protestant areas?

    What’s clear is that the GAA needs to do more, but that’s just my opinion, other GAA supporters may feel different.

  • darth rumsfeld

    “There are many GAA people more that willing to open up dialogue with unionists willing to actually discuss the subject but as you see from this thread and others there are many unionists who like nothing more than taking the opportunity to insult the GAA and it’s members. These people have no interest in ever joining the GAA.”

    Ta maca. I’m sure there are many such cases. But the point about the RUC/PSNI was that for every posititve contact individual RCs had with the RUC it was deemed necessary to have a symbolic purge. The same would seem to me necessary for the GAA- and of course there will always be people who ill have no interest. But it would be harder to excuse opposition to the County of Londonderry team playing its games at a renamed Celtic park ( surely not Rangers park). Free tickets for state school kids is fine and dandy, but as effective as holding Blue Lamp discos in Ballymurphy.

    BTW I would be genuinely interested to know why Armagh GAA play in Orange. Who picks the team colours?

  • Darth
    There is a big difference between the RUC/PSNI and the GAA. The PSNI are the forces of law and order, the GAA are just a cultural organisation, the comparison fails in many ways. However I know what you mean and sort of agree.

    Re:colours, each county has chosen colours for whatever historical reasons. I’m sure there’s some Armagh folk around here who could explain the significance of Armagh’s colour.

  • darth rumsfeld

    “There is a big difference between the RUC/PSNI and the GAA. The PSNI are the forces of law and order, the GAA are just a cultural organisation, the comparison fails in many ways.”

    I completely agree, but someone- probably in the NIO public relations department- either commissioned a focus group or whatever, and decided the change had to be demonstrated at the very top- and, crucially, that there had to be some pain as well as some gain to show that this was more than posturing.

    I met some Orangemen in Donegal who were in a hurry to get away from the Rossknowlagh parade a few years ago to see a county game at Ballybofey- they were supporting their neighbour in the team, and for once the match wasn’t on a Sunday, which normally meant they wouldn’t attend.They didn’t see their principles as compromised, but they understood how others- including earlier generations of their own family- might not have shared their opinion. So there might be some room for progress-if e.g the GAA took out an ad in the News Letter on the 12th, wishing their fellow Irishmen a good day’s parading.

    I know there are 2 mindsets in the GAA, but let’s face it- only one is going to advance the sport, and it isn’t the one that commemorates hungerstrikers or names grounds and teams after IRA men.

  • Darth
    “decided the change had to be demonstrated at the very top- and, crucially, that there had to be some pain as well as some gain to show that this was more than posturing.”

    Grand, but remember the context. The state forces HAVE to police and therefore represent all communities.

    “So there might be some room for progress”

    I believe there definitly is. I just won’t be expecting change any time soon.
    See you back here in 10 years and we can debate the progress, if any 🙂

    Also, one thing to remember, the GAA won’t fix Northern Ireland’s problems and I don’t think Gaelic Games will ever be fully cross community until you sort out your problems first. If you can’t live together you’ll hardly play sports together.

    Then again, maybe maybe the great constitutional issue could be sorted out with a game of hurling. We win we get a United Ireland, you win … … you won’t.

  • darth rumsfeld

    “Then again, maybe maybe the great constitutional issue could be sorted out with a game of hurling. We win we get a United Ireland, you win … … you won’t. ”

    I’ll take that challenge. But Ian Paisley has to be referee…..

  • anna dale

    Never mind the fenian bog-trotters-come on Norn Iron tomorrow nite!!!

  • William Joyce

    The World’s Gone Msd: Or from your post, at least some parts of it are. Leavng asied your insults, your post is hard to follow because you keep abusing the word football in places where like Australia and Fiji where soccer is a minority game. The FAI is a discredited organization (let’s see them pay their tax bills, LOL)though it has been known as the FAI for many years and people, me included would call it as such. In the Irish context, as well as the American and others where soccer is a minory game, it sohuld be called soccer or Association football. In Germany, Italy etc where it is the national game, they might well call it something else. In the Irish context,it is another form of imperialism. The fact that the Indo etc list is as football does not change that. The GAA was set up to stop imperialistic encroachments such as that.

    Darth: It is a good thing Armagh wear Orange as too many counties wear green or the national colours.
    Ss regards getting Orangemen and Protestants involved, you seem to miss a vital point. Though this might win some political kudos or get the GAA involved in pointelss political disputes with Republicans, Unionists etc, it would not help the fostering of GAA games.
    The GAA could easte its time orgnaising all the David Beckham, Wayne Rooney wanna bes in the south or Nationalist North but it does not. It concentrates on building up solid clubs and it does a good job of it. Whatever money it has over could probably best be used helping school hurling and camogie much as Kilkenny has done. No point squandering resources on a reluctant and redundant constituency like the Orangemen of North East Ulster.
    I hope Cyprus win tonight. Some pundits are tipping them to. This will help dampen the FAI and htat has to be good. When Charlton’s mercenaries were doing well, Charlton used to complain about the state of Landsdowne for soccer matches. But Landsdowne is a rugby pitch not a soccer pitch. Thoughthe IRFU should be welcomed in Croker (and maybe Limerick as well if needed), the soccer lot should be given little slack.
    The game is building up the sport and the organization behind the sport, not appealing to the dreamers/wankers/mercenaries of association football in Ireland or falling into the political traps of the Unionists.
    The Unionists, Slugger’s GAA correspondent included, want the GAA to be “non political”by making it sing to their political hymn sheet.

  • nyhavn

    Speaking to a friend in Copenhagen tonight, it seems that the non sectarian supporters of northern ireland are in full flow.

    Billy boys, fenian blood and the 3rd batallion of the uvf are the main topic of the singing by the ‘loyal’ supporters in the tivoli gardens area.

  • William Joyce

    Meanwhile, the Indo are using the s- word whwen talking about Brian Kerr
    From being manager of the nation’s soccer team to becoming just another knuckle on the media hand. It’s a bit like seeing an old fighter selling pencils.

  • William Joyce

    And further: if football = soccer, by default, does language = English by default.
    We should say: Yes, he speaks some Spanish as well as language.
    Also Britain should be made put its name on its stamps. The same arrogance in everything
    Paddy plays rugby football on Monday, football on Tuesday, Australian Rules football on Wednesday, Gaelic etc.

    Of course, the normal thing would to say, he plays ball. But imperialism brooks no challengers.

  • darth rumsfeld

    “Speaking to a friend in Copenhagen tonight, it seems that the non sectarian supporters of northern ireland are in full flow.

    Billy boys, fenian blood and the 3rd batallion of the uvf are the main topic of the singing by the ‘loyal’ supporters in the tivoli gardens area.”

    well how did that get out? Did they kidnap a MOPEish stewardess from the plane and oppress her? Or did some wee inoffensive priest on holiday bump into them in the Oirish bar? Or perhaps the Danes as a matter of course learn all the historical and sectarian chants of Ulster at school, and instantly recognise the grievous insult (to the ears admittedly) of some bellowed chorus?

    Or maybe you’re just not very clever at trolling, and made it all up cos you really really really want it to be true, and you’re still choking over the UEFA award to the best behaved supporters in Europe and you’re quivering at what Sir David might do tonight as we whizz past Staunton’s dullards in ther world rankings.

    Yup that’ll be it.

  • willowfield

    MACA

    Unionist is not an ethnicity, dah!

    Essentially, it is. It is an identity for most people, and for most of those people it is also connected to being an Ulster Protestant. Of course, there are some unionists who don’t buy into this, but that doesn’t take away from the essential truth, that there is ethnicity in Ireland which identifies itself as unionist, and which is excluded by the GAA.

    nyhavn

    Speaking to a friend in Copenhagen tonight, it seems that the non sectarian supporters of northern ireland are in full flow. Billy boys, fenian blood and the 3rd batallion of the uvf are the main topic of the singing by the ‘loyal’ supporters in the tivoli gardens area.

    I was in Copenhagen and can confirm (a) there were no supports in Tivoli Gardens; (b) there were hundreds, if not thousands, in the Town Hall Square; and (c) there was no sectarian singing.