Making their mind up

The leadership of Sinn Fein are meeting in Dublin to discuss their participation in the Shadow Assembly. These discussions will include the results of an internal review with the rank-and-file membership.

  • Pete Baker
  • Greenflag

    I suspect that SF will officially withdraw from Peter Hains attempts to resuscitate this deader than dead useless canard.

  • Pete Baker

    They’ve decided to adopt a radical position..

    Following a lengthy discussion the Ard Chomhairle has agreed that Sinn Féin Assembly members will participate in the upcoming session of the Hain Assembly, on the same basis as before the summer recess, with the sole purpose of restoring the Good Friday Agreement institutions and only in work that genuinely contributes to that objective.”

    Expect the same attempt to nominate Paisley.. as before.. followed by non-participation in any debates..

  • Brenda

    The politics of sitting on your rear end and bumping along the process works for Sinn Fein. They have dragged this process, in particular over decommissioning, and now it can be dragged no further.

    Quite frankly, politics here will have to be in terms of beyond the GFA. Joint authority, IMO will be the next step. It’s acceptable enough for SF anyway. Why bother with these futile attempts?

  • Turbopaul

    Quite frankly, politics here will have to be in terms of beyond the GFA. Joint authority, IMO will be the next step. It’s acceptable enough for SF anyway.
    Brenda

    I agree Brenda as SF has its focus on next years general election in the South.

    The perfect senario for SF is to look like the victim if no deal is reached by Nov 24th so they can campaign under the banner of honest brokers who were thwarted by DUP intransegence.

    The window dressing will continue and woh betide the party who are left without a chair when the music stops on Nov 24th.

  • londonderry_loyal

    Forget the GFA, it is dead and does not have the support of the majority of both communities. An agreement is needed were both communities can agree to

  • Turbopaul

    An agreement is needed were both communities can agree to
    londonderry_loyal

    Maybe an agreement where both communities agree to disagree, but agree to work with eachother.

    Then again, wasn’t that what the GFA was meant to be??

  • lib2016

    Strand 1 was the carrot for unionists, Strand 2 the carrot for nationalists and Strand 3 a meaningless fudge.

    The referendum was passed by a huge majority and not even the most obsessive unionist opponents of the GFA suggest another referendum. It’s signed, sealed and about to be delivered, with or without Strand 1.

    The unionist veto always depended on the guys with baseball bats. They can’t even keep the teagues out of a graveyard these days.

  • Brenda

    ‘Then again isn’t that what the GF was meant to be’

    Turbo No. The GFA was advertised to the ordinary punter in the street as delivering peace. It was something for everybody and nothing for nobody. I think its failure arose out of it’s own contradictions. These institutions that SF is so focused on. A pure waste of money. Talking shops. Joint authority would I suppose be better than cross border bodies. So what is there to work towards in the shadow assembly. The restoring of the institutions, that is the setting up of stormont – again. And so the head count begins, only this time the DUP don’t really wanna deal, don’t really want Stormont on GFA terms, and they don’t want joint authority either.

    In that case IMO we have to move on beyond the agreement. Joint authority is the next step, and until our politicians are mature enough to take power, thats it for a very long time.

  • lib2016

    Brenda,

    When do you suggest that we have a referendum on Joint Authority and why do you believe that the British or most other people would be interested in it?

    The only people I have seen pushing the idea have been unionists terrified by the growth of both Sinn Fein and the nationalist as a whole share of the vote.

    Given that unionism is fading away it wouldn’t seem wise to impose a solution which would leave nationalists even more discontent than they are at present.

  • Brenda

    I don’t think there will be a referendum on joint authority, I think it will be a fait a compli pardon my french. I think it will just happen when the curtain comes down on the institutions on the 24th. Why would there be a referendai on it if there would be nothing else. It won’t be direct rule as the governments have already signalled that this is what would be on offer if the parties fail to reach agreement by then.

    I haven’t seen the unionists push for joint authority terrified as they are of Dublin rule. I think the idea was floated to persuade the unionists well if you don’t agree and get in there to stormont then this is what you will get instead. J Authority would not be all in the interests of SF as it would signify the end of the GFA and they would not be involved in exercising power in both parts of the island!

    Thats my take on it which could be wrong. But I don’t think its completely wrong lib.

  • Garibaldy

    No chance of joint authority. Brits have already said this, and the free staters don’t want the hassle. Nor the expense if they were to do it properly.

  • Brenda

    I didn’t see that garry. so do you know whats on offer if nothing happens after the 24. I’ve been away quite a bit and haven’t been keeping up to date.

  • Garibaldy

    I’ve no special knowledge. There was talk of joint management but then Hain made very clear that this would not be joint authority. More of the same I’d say, rather than any massive changes.

  • Gerry Lvs Castro

    ”unionists terrified by the growth of both Sinn Fein and the nationalist as a whole share of the vote.”

    Yes and no Lib. I was chatting to the woman collecting the election forms the other day and she commented that in our village (which is 87% Protestant), she had only managed to collect 30% of the election forms completed. She added that many locals had simply lost interest in local politics and couldn’t be bothered filling in their forms year after year.
    I would suggest that in areas such as my own with a traditional UUP electorate, many voters are disillusioned and fed up with the current shenanigans, and traditional SDLP voters are in similar mind, while the DUP and SF are still able to get their vote out.
    This does not however prove a lack of interest in the Union — if and when a border poll takes place, the ‘silent Unionists’ are likely to come out of the woodwork.

  • Frustrated Democrat

    Lib2016

    There you go again statements which have no foundation in fact. The nationalist republican vote is not growing this has already been demonstrated in a recent thread please pay attention.

    Please get you facts right e.g. there will not be a UI by 2016 or 2061 unless unionist vote for it. With attitudes like yours is that going to happen? – NO!

  • Turbopaul

    I’ve no special knowledge. There was talk of joint management but then Hain made very clear that this would not be joint authority.

    Gari, and you believe Peter, time to go, Hain????

    Hell hath no fury like a politician scorned.

    I believe that Hain, if still NI secretary, will be vindictive in his approach to Joint authority, especially if no deal is reached due to DUP intransegence.

    Backdoor power sharing between London and Dublin,under a European umbrella, in spite of the assurences given to DUP by Brit govt and Dublin.

    Even law can be changed to suit the Brits and Dublin, using Europe as an excuse.

    Mind you, who knows who will be at the helm in London and Dublin come next year???????

  • DesertDigs

    Frustrated Democrat

    “Please get you facts right e.g. there will not be a UI by 2016 or 2061 unless unionist vote for it”

    There will not be a UI by 2016 or 2061 unless A MAJORITY vote for it (not a unionist choice).

  • Frustrated Democrat

    desertdigs

    By ‘unionist’ I mean people who currently believe in the union (protestant and catholic) which is 60% plus maybe even 70% of the population in NI. Unless a substantial number of that 60% plus vote for a UI it isn’t going to happen. Pronouncements by republicans that it will be by 2016 (eg lib2016) are regarded as pointless rhetoric by people who will not face up to the fact that they were misled by GA and the GFA due to demographic movements.

    If Republicans and Nationlist leaders would accept this in public, as they have done in private, and concentrate on normal politics we might get somewhere with all of those things which need to be done for all of the people on NI.

  • lib2016

    Frustrated Democrat,

    I notice that in all your posts you are careful not to deny my point that the nationalist share of the vote is steadily increasing.

    Republicans will probably have a majority of the electorate voting for nationalist parties within the next Parliamentary period. No-one can foresee how quickly that will become a majority in a constitutional referendum.

    Time enough then

  • bob

    Frustrated Democrat

    Gerry ask for accomadations to unionism in his casement park speech. dont know if you were there. He also delivered

    An end to the war
    Decommissioning
    An end to criminality

    I think republicans have showed trhey want to deal with real issues. How can we when unionism still refuse to share power. Maybe your answer is we forsake our goal of a united and democratic ireland. I don’t see why we can not tackle local problems while a sizeable proportion of the population believes the best answer is a united ireland. I thought you were free to hold views like this in a democracy. Maybe my politics module in Queen’s didn’t explain democracy fully enough. Shame on our nationalist politicians letting our universities fall below standard. If only we got an assembly up and running to sort these problems.