“Ratepayers need an explanation.”

Is the Hunger Strike Rally using Belfast City Council’s Dunville Park? Bik McFarlance says so (scroll down):

“The theme of the Commemoration will be “Cuímhníonn Glúinn/A Generation Remembers” in which the story of the Hunger Strike will be told through street theatre along eight key points of the route from Dunville Park on the Falls Road to Casement Park on the Andersonstown Road.”

  • DaithiO

    FD you really are like a dog with a bone about this ! Intransigent unionist attitudes like yours really are why, in Ireland, conflict resolution is such a drawn out thing.

    Instead of never, nevering, surely it would be better to send our elected representetives to the house on the hill to debate these issues.

    So some public spaces will be used to commemorate 10 hunger strikers. This is as bad as public spaces being used by the triumphalists on the glorious 12th. As bad, not better and not worse. So please end these double standards !

    Why can’t everyone just grow up and move on ?

  • Bushmills

    Have the organisors submitted an 11/1 form to the Pardes Commission for this delightful demonstration?

  • circles

    Does he really Fair Deal? Does he not just simply say “from” Dunville Park.
    How would you define “use” of the park here, and how could you differentiate between a busy day at the park and the park being “used” for something else? If they set of from the park whats the big deal?

    Now here we’re going to get into pedantics but you could go on and say they’re going to “use the falls road too – and the question there is what right do the rates payers have to say who can use the roads, what defines use, when is this use appropriate / inappropriate? and who should decide this? How could this all be squared with the principal of freedom of assembly? I think some of the orangemen posting might be able to help us out on the legalities of this (finally a chance for some constructive exchange!!!)

  • Mick Fealty

    I would be very surprised if it was inside the park FD. It just looks like a colloquial form of words to me. Any chance of getting clarification on this?

  • fair_deal

    Daithi

    It would be hypocritical if I didn’t ask BCC the same questions as I have asked of the GAA.

    Bushmills

    Yes they have.

    Circles

    1. They are using Casment Park and the word “to” is chosen.
    2. Unlike a public road where notice has to be given you have to ask permission for use of a public park for an event. I can’t find anything in recent Council minutes agreeing to its use.
    3. The appropriate use of BCC facilities is also a topic of debate right now.

  • Daisy

    Is Ballysillan Leisure Centre not free that day?

  • hun

    http://www.osfbf.pro.ie/

    enter in english or beggar tongue – your choice

    click on events and scroll to bottom

    ‘main assembly point dunville park at 1:00pm’

  • fair_deal

    Mick

    The park has been used regularly for such events in the past.

    “Sinn Féin North Belfast MLA Gerry Kelly addressing the annual Hunger Strike Rally in Dunville Park,”

    http://www.sinnfein.ie/news/detail/9578

    “The marchers gathered at Dunville Park”

    http://www.relativesforjustice.com/victims/john_downes.htm

    “HUNGER-STRIKE COMMEMORATION: Rally at Dunville Park, Falls Road, BELFAST, County Antrim, Sunday 2 May. Assembly points: Gardenmore Road, Twinbrook, 12.30pm; Greenways Shop, Lenadoon, 1pm; Busy Bee, Andersonstown, 1.15pm; Trinity Lodge, Turf Lodge, 1pm; Springfield/Whiterock Road, 1.15pm; Beechmount, 1.30pm; Ardoyne Avenue, 1pm; Mountpottinger Road, 1.30pm, Cromac Street, 1.45pm. All visiting bands and marches should assemble at Gardenmore Road Twinbrook.”

    http://republican-news.org/archive/1999/April29/29imea.html

    “If the poor turn-out at Sunday week’s rally in Dunville Park cannot simply be put down to poorly-organised mobilisation, then Sinn Fein have turned out to be the victims of Feile an Phobail’s success story. ”

    http://dannymorrison.ie/articles/august9.html

    “And when the spaceship lands in Dunville Park on Sunday at 3 o’clock to take all true believers to a united Ireland, the gofers can go first class”

    http://www.phoblacht.net/pullingthegunsam.html

    “On Sunday, May 4, thousands of republicans rallied in heavy rain in Belfast’s Dunville Park to celebrate the election of the two Sinn Fein candidates and to mark the death of Bobby Sands, a republican prisoner who died on hunger strike on May 5, 1981.”

    http://www.themilitant.com/1997/6120/6120_6.html

  • Michael McGowan

    My firm advice to the kind of people who want to attend events like this is to get a life. My family did. In fact we left Ireland to live in the hated oppressor country, Britain, where guess what….despite being Catholics ,we weren’t beaten, tortured and murdered but managed to become happier, healthier and wealthier from 1916 onwards. It seems that some people really would lose their sense of identity (not to mention large sums of taxpayers’ dosh) if they didn’t have their ancestral sores to pick.

  • Mick Fealty

    I stand corrected. In which case, read alongside the SF protest of the use of Ballysillan this is turning into a bit of a PR quagmire for SF.

  • Dualta

    The OO have used Ormeau Park in the past and I see nothing wrong with that. They are a political organisation.

    The UUP and the DUP and the Ulster Resistance (actually the latter two are kinda the ssame thing aren’t they?) used the Ulster Hall.

    The UUP have used the Waterfront Hall and the Millenium Forum in Derry, both owned by their respective city councils.

    It’s not like SF are doing something entirely new here by using council property for a political meeting/rally.

    It’s the use of Casement which remains the issue here FD.

    The subject of this thread has no constructive contribution to make. It smacks of sectarian nit-picking.

  • pete’s sake

    What about the Ulster-Scots version, Hun?

    ‘Ach, there’ll be a fair big crood danderin up the Falls tae listen to a bit a blaitherin’ and gurnin’ from yon turncoat from planter stock, thon sleeked Big Gerry.

    All dacent ulsterman tae stay hame wi’ the weans aten barnbrack praying that big Chieftain Laird will stap dotin’.

    We say houl’ your whist, Gerry!!!’

  • The World’s Gone Mad

    Surely this isn’t about sectarianism?! This is the mantra that’s been preached for the last couple of weeks. The GAA is not sectarian, SF is not sectarian, the IRA/INLA campaign was not sectarian, my posts are not sectarian yada yada yada. So how can discussions about a totally non-sectarian (honest guv) event be seen as sectarian nit-picking?

  • circles

    Thanks for the clarification there FD – athough I agree with Dualta here that with discussion on the use of the park we’re getting into nit-picking of the most senseless kind – and clearly only to point a finger.

    The shinners seem to have been so daft as to speak out against the use of Ballysillan leisure centre. This seems to not have been on a point of principal but rather out of sheer reflex that “they” shouldn’t be doing that – much like this post. Neither are constructive ways of resolving issues that in the end effect mainly only the communities that live where these things happen.

    Move along folks – nothing more to see here

  • bootman

    “ratepayers need an explanation”– who exactly is being quoted here?

  • John East Belfast

    “which the story of the Hunger Strike will be told through street theatre”

    Sounds like a grotesque freak show.

    How low can these people stoop in their Mopery and desire to poison the minds of children who will undoubtedly be dragged along and schooled in the language of how oppressed they are under the eveil British – just to ensure another generation does not forget.

  • kensei

    “How low can these people stoop in their Mopery and desire to poison the minds of children who will undoubtedly be dragged along and schooled in the language of how oppressed they are under the eveil British – just to ensure another generation does not forget.”

    Neither should they forget. Forgiving and moving on is a different thing.

    “The shinners seem to have been so daft as to speak out against the use of Ballysillan leisure centre. This seems to not have been on a point of principal but rather out of sheer reflex that “they” shouldn’t be doing that – much like this post. Neither are constructive ways of resolving issues that in the end effect mainly only the communities that live where these things happen.”

    I agree that speaking out against Ballysillian was complete idiocy, but can we be clear? The IRA has stood down. This is more SF than IRA whereas Ballysillian was more UDA than UP-hatever. So there is a distinction here.

  • circles

    John – Did you get an invitation? Do you live along the falls? I can understand that you personally do not agree with the people along the falls and andytown commeomorating the hunger strike, that is of course your right and its interesting to discuss your views on this.

    But whether or not you agree with the programme of the ceremony is completely irrelevant. Its extremely unlikely that you would say “well down with this sort of thing, but that street theatre sure does sound interesting”.
    So if you don’t like it what would you suggest?

  • circles

    kensei – surely a pragmatic and generous response from the shinners would have been more sensible. Meetings and discussions of the UDA “housekeeping” must be preferable to them whacking each other left and right again. And if public facilities can serve to encourage discussions then all the better.
    The shinner knee jerk was bad as nobody consulted their brain before engaging their mouth – bad craic altogether. I’m not comparing the IRA to the UDA here either – I#m talking about being pragmatic to keep people from shooting each other.

  • circles

    “nobody consulted their brain before engaging their mouth” – and the same can e said abut posting this dunville thing

  • bootman

    All this contrived “controversy” can only increase the attendance, should be a good day

  • nmc

    From my Feile programme:

    National Hunger Strike 25th Anniversary Commemeration Rally

    Assemble Conway Street. This August thousands of republicans from all over the world will gather on the streets of Belfast to honour the sacrifice of the 10 Hunger Strikers. In an innovative and unique performance they will be celebrated using interactive theatre techniques. Featuring Special Guest Frances Black.

  • kensei

    “kensei – surely a pragmatic and generous response from the shinners would have been more sensible. Meetings and discussions of the UDA “housekeeping” must be preferable to them whacking each other left and right again. And if public facilities can serve to encourage discussions then all the better.
    The shinner knee jerk was bad as nobody consulted their brain before engaging their mouth – bad craic altogether. I’m not comparing the IRA to the UDA here either – I#m talking about being pragmatic to keep people from shooting each other.”

    Oh, I absolutely 100% fully agree, the entire comments were stupid from any angle you care to take. But there is a distinction here, and the attempted equivalence doesn’t rerally hold up.

  • Bushmills

    JEB

    “which the story of the Hunger Strike will be told through street theatre”

    Thank your lucky stars its the Hunger Strike and not the dirty protest being displayed through the medium of street theatre!

  • darth rumsfeld

    LOL Bushmills

  • Realist

    Will Bik be recounting why he ended up in Long Kesh during this “story of the Hunger Strike”?

  • Chris Donnelly

    This one gets more amusing by the day.

    I’m sorry Mick, but to describe this as a PR quagmire for Sinn Fein is really stretching it- why not point up the reciprocal unionist hypocrisy of lambasting the GAA but remaining silent on the UDA’s use of the Leisure Centre?

    The fuss over using Casement Park and now of using Dunville Park to gather before a march is actually not only amusing but only likely to garner more support for the rally and for Sinn Fein.

    In fact, as republicans have been dropping thousands of leaflets advertising this parade through doors across the north, they have been reporting more interest in this republican demonstration than in any since the re-interment of Tom Williams some years ago- far from a quagmire, it has actually only succeeded in galvanising support for the occasion and for republicanism.

    Incidentally, I must have imagined the Orange Order’s use of Ormeau Park for their Twelfth commemorations several years ago, which actually was the destination point of the parade.

    On this occasion, FD seems to be suggesting that people should not be allowed to assemble in or around the perimeter of Dunville Park for a parade up the Falls Road.

    Now, I wouldn’t know- and nor would I particularly care to- where every Orange and flute band parade begins and ends, but I would hazard a guess that many would ‘assemble’ on green areas located adjacent to roads- which is the case with Dunville Park.

    This one differs from the Casement Park discussion, which is altogether more interesting for a number of reasons.

    Many unionists have jumped on the use of Casement Park to have a go at the GAA, like they did a couple of weeks ago when a Hunger Strike commemoration jersey was launched by several Antrim players and the Senior football manager(even though that had no more to do with the GAA than David Jeffreys being an Orangeman should equate Linfield FC with the Order.)

    For me, however, this argument neatly crystallises the point I made on a thread some weeks (about the Nomadic and Maidstone ships) back about the need for the nationalist tradition to be afforded equal legitimacy within the state.

    Fionnuala O’Connor accurately depicted the northern nationalist community as having gone about creating a “state within a state” since partition, and she was right. Excluded and alienated from the British and unionist state infrastructure since partition and before it, nationalist society revolved around the church, its education system and the GAA.

    In fact, given that the Church was always reluctant to publicly associate itself at the highest levels with Irish nationalism (contrary to the beliefs of some, the Church has always maintained that it has a ‘higher’ purpose and been wary of Irish nationalism accordingly) the GAA stood alone as the only nationalist ‘institution,’ albeit one primarily concerned with promoting the Games themselves.

    While unionists had the power and authority to name and build roads, bridges, buildings and parks after their statesmen and soldiers- as well as erecting prominently positioned war memorials in virtually every village, town and city in the 6 counties, nationalists really only had the GAA through which to fulfil their collective desire to confer legitimacy upon their historical and political leaders.

    In many ways it has always been an admission of the inferior position afforded nationalism within the state that the GAA has been a channel through which Irish nationalist energies have been funneled.

    This brings us to the present day. The furore over this rally will change nothing, and indeed can rightly be dismissed within the GAA rules as not representing a ‘party political’ event. (I find it ironic that those seeking to paint the H-Block Commemoration committee as simply a front for Sinn Fein are the first to claim that Loyal Orders are distinct from flute bands, whatever about cross-membership….)

    Across the country, GAA grounds and club houses are used for gatherings by Fianna Fail and Fine Gael primarily, as well as by republicans, simply due to the fact that, when the state would not provide community and leisure facilities at a local level (and in this I refer to the 26 county state as much as the 6 county state) the GAA stepped in.

    The GAA today is more confident, forward-looking and inclusive than at any time in its history. I say that as someone who only really got into Gaelic Games in my late teens, as I had always been encouraged by family to play soccer in my youth.

    CONTINUED BELOW

  • Chris Donnelly

    Like most children, I was guided by my father when it came to taking an interest in sports from a very young and impressionable age. When I thought about this and spoke with my father, I worked out that the reason he had never thought about encouraging me to play Gaelic Games was because, as a child, he had been ‘banned’ from Gaelic Games because he had been seen playing soccer in Belfast’s Boney fields by a GAA club stalwart- a development which clouded his perception of the GAA for decades to come.

    Like others, he fell victim to the mean-spirited attitude of some within the GAA in past generations, who misguidedly viewed this as a strategy to secure continued support and expansion for the sports.

    Such attitudes have been shelved and pushed asunder by an Association which can be immensely proud of its unique status in Ireland today, which includes having provided -historically speaking- a communal release for a community which, from partition, was largely ignored by not only the governing unionists of the north, but also the official institutions of the southern state.

    One example of the progressive and strategically advanced thinking of the GAA was their support for the new stadium at the Long Kesh/ Maze site. Whilst many thought the GAA would run or drag their heels, it ended up as the only one of the three local sporting bodies which gave enthusiastic support to the project, undoubtedly viewing the new stadium as a chance to attract supporters from non-nationalist backgrounds, whilst also recognising the potential to generate income from what would likely be the third best stadium in Ireland (after Croke and the new Lansdowne Road.)

    That republicans would seek to gather in Casement Park is really no different than unionists gathering in the grounds of the various Town and City Halls across the north which have impressive sculptures and memorials in honour of their dead. Whilst Casement does not have such memorials located on its ground, it doesn’t need to: nationalists are very conscious of the role the GAA has played within their community for the past century.

    Things may change in time, but this will only happen when the state and its institutions begin to reflect the nationalist tradition.

  • Garibaldy

    Chris,

    Interesting posts, although I have a couple of points. I’m not too sure about this state within a state business, certainly not after the first 5 or 10 years when accomodations with the state were certainly being made in the like of education. I was wondering what you saw as the role of the AOH and similar bodies within nationalism. Particularly in the early years of the state, the AOH was a hugely important body, as it had been for decades before, a power base for the likes of Wee Joe Devlin. I’d say it was more important as an expression of political identity for a long time.

    I was also wondering how you believed the state could reflect the nationalist tradition?

  • The Devil

    Chris Donnelly: A very reasoned and informative post. It certainly put many things in perspective for this here “outsider”. Many thanks for that.

  • harpo

    “HUNGER-STRIKE COMMEMORATION: Rally at Dunville Park, Falls Road, BELFAST, County Antrim, Sunday 2 May. Assembly points: Gardenmore Road, Twinbrook, 12.30pm; Greenways Shop, Lenadoon, 1pm; Busy Bee, Andersonstown, 1.15pm; Trinity Lodge, Turf Lodge, 1pm; Springfield/Whiterock Road, 1.15pm; Beechmount, 1.30pm; Ardoyne Avenue, 1pm; Mountpottinger Road, 1.30pm, Cromac Street, 1.45pm. All visiting bands and marches should assemble at Gardenmore Road Twinbrook.”

    Fair Deal:

    At which of the 8 points mentioned by Bik will they be having the shit-smearing demonstration by ex-prisoners?

  • Garibaldy

    Harpo,

    someone beat you to that joke already

  • John East Belfast

    Chris Donnelly

    We are not talking about nationalists we are talking about militant Irish Republicans – in my mind Terrorists.

    People who committed murder and acted outside the law.
    They were regarded as criminals by every authority in the world with the exception of Pre Berlin Wall Communist Europe and odious regimes like Libya.
    Most importantly in the 26 Counties they werent even given legitimacy and many of their members spent long years in prison there.

    Even more significantly they were never the majority nationalist party in the 6 counties until they moved away (ever so slowly)from violence.

    I will do all in my power to ensure that history does not afford legitimacy on these organisations that destroyed my child hood. I stress this to my children.

    I am not denying that some of them got caught up in things – maybe were even provoked – but then that is why society afforded them mercy under the Agreement and let them out of prison.

    However I never ever said that what they did was legitimate or justified – Orange or Green.

    This is why I am totally opposd to my own party’s association with the PUP.

    We need to bury this period as a blot on our history not as something to be remembered – the commeration of it will only sow the seeds for more division for the future.

    This is all about legitimacy and such desire for it needs to be resisted for our future peace.

  • harpo

    ‘I stand corrected. In which case, read alongside the SF protest of the use of Ballysillan this is turning into a bit of a PR quagmire for SF.’

    Mick:

    I’ve lost count. Is this double standards or triple standards from Provo Sinn Fein?

    First they claim that private property belongs to the people too.

    Next they claim that public property can’t be used by certain people.

    Now they have no problem with public property being used by certain people, so long as the certain people are them.

    I’d like to hear a PSF person explain the consistency of these ‘arguments’.

  • harpo

    ‘It’s not like SF are doing something entirely new here by using council property for a political meeting/rally…The subject of this thread has no constructive contribution to make. It smacks of sectarian nit-picking.’

    Actually, it does have a contribution to make. It shows up the hypocricy of PSF once again.

    Like you I have no problem with public facilities being used for political purposes, so long as no rules are broken.

    The thing here though is that just yesterday PSF were whining about a certain political group using public facilities. They can’t very well do that while at the same time a political event being effectively run by them is to use public property.

    As Mick says they are into a PR quagmire here. No consistency. Just one Shinner appearing after another and each of them contradicting the previous one.

  • John East Belfast

    circles

    “So if you don’t like it what would you suggest?”

    I would let people of the ilk of Father Faul tell all those young nationalist minds that the hunger strikers committed suicide which is a serious sin against their religion for a start.

    Then I would tell them that they starved themselves to death for no tangible benefit whatsoever other than it began the electoral success of Sinn Fein within a partitioned Ireland.

    I would tell them they broke their mothers’ and loved ones’ hearts.

    I would also tell them that their deaths led to countless more violence and many more broken hearts.

    How in God’s name could anyone think the Hunger Strikes were anything other than a trajedy that didnt need to happen and the blame for it lies at nobody’s door other than the ones who killed themselves and the sinister forces who persuaded them to do so.

    I have little doubt the latter are now salvaging their own consciences with these rallies.

    This is about honouring “mother Ireland” with the blood she demands of young Irish men.

  • hun

    I feel that it would be a real insult to Irishness to associate Irish culture with the ethos of militant Irish republicanism. Celebrating ethnic cleansers and sectarian murderers – like Bik McFarlane; and raising these people to hero status in a community is surely a great disservice to that community and wider society. To have a culture based around the sectarian hatred of the other main culture on the island of Ireland, and to glorify sick and cowardly murder is so primative, so base, that it must be confronted for what it is – b1gotry.

  • john devlin

    How low can these people stoop in their Mopery and desire to poison the minds of children… – just to ensure another generation does not forget.

    does,nt sound like a million miles from what ‘the twelth’ is all about now, does it john?

  • john devlin

    john east Belfast-‘We need to bury this period as a blot on our history not as something to be remembered – the commeration of it will only sow the seeds for more division for the future.’
    Are you talking about 1690 John? or is the twelth something completely different, just a family day out for everyone?Enlighten me

  • bootman

    I’ll ask again. Who exactly is being quoted in the title of this discussion saying “Ratepayers need an explanation” ?

  • circles

    Good post Chris! Much appreciated that you took the trouble to put all that down. Some may still try and argue the toss on the past the naming of streets, bridges etc. and the whole idea of nationalists ever having been kept behind the curtain of pulic life – you did a nice job highlighting that.

    Hun: ” To have a culture based around the sectarian hatred of the other main culture on the island of Ireland, and to glorify sick and cowardly murder is so primative, so base, that it must be confronted for what it is – b1gotry.”
    You could have posted this under a thread on orange marches – and would have been more accurate if you had done so. You may be describing your version what you see as Irish Republicanism but its a fairly upside down version.

    JEB: I think you have mpletely misunderstood the motivations behind the hunger strike in the first place. It must surely wasn’t about any Paisley style blood sacrifce to appease “mother” Ireland, it was rater a last desparate action by a group of men who were afforded no other way out of the miserable situation they were being held in. They did nt see themselves as criminals and refused to be treated as such – even if meant “cosey” cells and a nice clean uniform. You said “that they starved themselves to death for no tangible benefit whatsoever” – but read the books and ask their comrades who were inside and they’ll tell you a diferent story. They achieved the treatment and the recognition they demanded in the end. The electoral rise of SF was not the aim of the hunger strike – I don’t nk it would have crossed anybody’s mind thathis may have been a side-effect.
    And whilst it may assuage some to think that there were “sinister forces” behind the strike, maybe that makes the whole thing less frightening for you. The truth is is much more likely that it was the strength and determination of the men themselves and their dedication to their comrades that motivated them. And I can see how for unionism and loyalism d the british it would be frightening to admit that republicans possessed these qualities – so the black propaganda continues until today, to repaint the picture of the hunger strike.

  • John East Belfast

    John Devlin

    I am not an Orangeman and I havent been to a 12th in years but no there is no similarity between the commemorating the Battle of the Boyne and commemorating the Hunger Strikes.

    The 12th was an historical European battle typical of the religious power struggles between kings of the 17th Century. It protected the Glorious Revolution – further defining the role of King and subject and advanced the long term development of British democracy. It also secured the place of Protestants on this island – all of which some of my brethern commemorate each year along with the music, traditions and colours that also define who and why they are. For Protestants and Unionists it is on a par with 4th July and Bastille Day – the British dont find the former anyway offensive.

    Anyhow the hunger strikes was part of an illegal and sordid terrorist campaign where certain individuals went against natural law and starved themselves to death with no reguard for the consequences.
    An act of complete selfishness and self flagellation – indicative of a mindset that yearns to be eternally oppressed. Now they want to perpetuate that feeling of oppression by ensuring that future generations can feel bad about it.

    As posters on Slugger always have a dig at Unionists – no culture, etc – even lately “No Intellectuals” – why doesnt someone do a thread

    “Why do Nationalist never celebrate and Commemorate Positive Victories”

    The 12th was a Glorious success – along with the Siege of Derry.
    All nationalists want to do is remember and record defeats – Hunger Strikes, Potato Famine, Bloody Sunday, 1916 ….. the list is both monotonous and endless – bloody saddoes.

    Perhaps John that is the main difference between the 12th and the Hunger Strikes ??

    Circles

    “And I can see how for unionism and loyalism d the british it would be frightening to admit that republicans possessed these qualities”

    I fear them as I do those who will strap explosives to their chests or who will fly aeroplanes into tall buildings. However that is nothing to esteemed or respected.

    Honestly is this what Irish Republicanism is about ? – You can keep it.

  • john devlin

    JEB- Ah now, come on John are you seriously telling me that all those 12th night bonfires, eg Agohill, are full of people singing and dancing about the virtues of king and subject and the advancement of british democracy? More about F.T.Pope and K.A.Taigs
    British Democracy- YOU can keep it

  • circles

    JEB: Yeah well I know that some loyalists aren’t exactly into the idea of doing something to improve the lot of fellow loyalists – thats a recurrent theme right through loyalist paramilitarism to loyalist politics. And that people fear what they don’t understand. So its probably only normal that loyalists don’t actually get what it was all about. And I suppose its no coincidence that the most popular books borrowed were on body building rather than politics.

  • circles

    And I suppose its no coincidence that the most popular books borrowed by loyalists in Long Kesh from the library were on body building rather than politics.

  • GPJ

    Hypocrisy and contradictions from those who are making a scare to cause a crisis with this commeration march.

    In essence the sacrifices of these people and the sufferings of their families is an inspiration to many people on this island and internationally: ie:( Bobby Sands Street in many cities worldwide ).

    Hypocrisy because the same critics of republicanism are silent when sectarianism marches the streets in the form of the OO/KKK.
    Militant Irish Republicanism has earned the right to express itself and commerate its fallen.

  • The Devil

    I have no idea who the muppet impersonator was earlier in this thread, but I would like to reaffirm that it will be a cold day in hell before I agree with some daft shinner about anything.