Mayor now authorised to condemn killing of Garda McCabe?

In the aftermath of her controversial appearance on RTÉ’s The Late Late Show, Sinn Féin Cllr Toireasa Ferris, current Mayor of Kerry, accused host Pat Kenny of an ambush, and today faced a no confidence motion in Kerry County Council. Both UTV and RTÉ report the result of that vote, a 4 votes rejection of the motion[with 5 abstentions].. but the Limerick Blogger adds information on the 3 other votes on the issue.. including one which proposed that the Council, as a whole, did condemn the killing of Garda Jerry McCabe – agreed by all except the two SF councillors, who were then censured in a subsequent vote. That should mean that the Mayor of Kerry does have the authority to do the same.. who’ll be the first journalist to ask her?

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  • The Dubliner

    A wonderful in-built irony in what Sinn Fein refer to as “The Politics of Condemnation” is that those who engage in it under the pretence to furthering democratic interests are asserting by their actions that it is a legitimate practice in a democracy to seek to censure, disenfranchise, defame, harangue, etc, those who hold dissenting viewpoints and refuse to engage in said practice, thereby deploying a practice that is more fitting to Fascism than democracy.

    In a democracy, no-one has a moral or political imperative to either condemn or condone, despite the attempts by deluded quasi-fascist journalists to censure, disenfranchise, defame, and harangue them into doing so.

    Ergo, in a democracy, a person is perfectly entitled to refuse to condemn the murders of 100,000+ Iraqis, without elaborating on justifications and the moral or political criteria involved; and without others drawing any inappropriate inferences from the refusal, or reprehensible sanctions being imposed. You will find that George W. Bush (and all supporters of the Iraq War) will, by default, refuse to condemn those mass-murders of Iraqis. That is their democratic right.

    Perhaps someone needs to enlighten certain journalists who see themselves as self-appointed defenders of Irish democracy as to a key distinction between fascism and democracy.

  • Ultonian Scottis American

    I’m confused. I thought everybody condemned the tyrant Sadaam Hussein. Why don’t you?

  • TAFKABO

    I think the point is not that she refuses to condemn this killing, but that the electorate are fully informed on the views of those they vote for.

    Seems to me that the journalists did a good job in exposing the seedy underbelly of Sinn Fein, no matter how many bright young things they put forward as candidates.

  • Shore Road Resident

    Rarely have I seen such desperate sophistry as Dubliner’s post above. See Fintan O’Toole in the Irish Times today pal for a lesson in how you could have made a point there if you weren’t trying to make another condemnation in turn yourself.

    As for Sinn Fein, they have no problem with the politics of condemnation in individual murders or atrocities when it suits them. Pat Finucane and Bloody Sunday spring to mind.

  • Good for the Goose

    SRR

    So the last time a Labour or Tory minister here was asked to condemn the Bloody Sunday murders was when exactly? We have heard John Reid on recently telling us all to look past British soldier transgressions in Iraq.

  • Shore Road Resident

    So you agree that Bloody Sunday and the murder of Pat Finucane should be condemned.
    What’s this SF problem with ‘the politics of condemnation’ then?

    Almost daily for years, Shinners have demanded not only that the British government apologise for these crimes but that it confess to Gerry at once that they were consistently ordered at cabinet level. Doesn’t the same standard apply to the IRA army council at least, let alone senior members of Sinn Fein?

    It is almost unbelievably depressing that you could title yourself ‘Good for the Goose’ while making such a totally blind one-sided posting.

  • Still good for the goose

    SRR

    I didn’t say I agreed or disagreed with anything I just asked you when has a BBC/UTV/RTE interviewer ever asked the same questions to british ministers? IMHO it would be a breath of fresh air. It Sinn Fein members must face such questions then everyone should how is that being one sided?

  • Shore Road Resident

    You’ve changed your tune.

    Your first post said that the goal of asking such questions was to: “censure, disenfranchise, defame, harangue, etc, those who hold dissenting viewpoints”

    Now you say that such questions from interviewers would be “a breath of fresh air”.

    So which is it?

  • Sauce for the Goose

    SRR

    Are you actually reading my posts? Where do I change my tune or indeed mention any of the goals you allure to? I’m simply stating that interviewers should be consistant accross the board please prove me wrong that this is not the case.

  • Shore Road Resident

    I’ve just re-read your first post and it states, as far as I can see, that interviewers should not engage in the ‘politics of condemnation’ at all because:

    “those who engage in it under the pretence to furthering democratic interests are asserting by their actions that it is a legitimate practice in a democracy to seek to censure, disenfranchise, defame, harangue, etc, those who hold dissenting viewpoints”

    You add that pursuing a ‘politics of condemnation’ line of questioning is:

    “more fitting to Fascism than democracy”

    You then say:

    “In a democracy, no-one has a moral or political imperative to either condemn or condone, despite the attempts by deluded quasi-fascist journalists to censure, disenfranchise, defame, and harangue them into doing so.”

    However, in post 7 you say:

    “when has a BBC/UTV/RTE interviewer ever asked the same questions to british ministers? IMHO it would be a breath of fresh air.”

    So I ask you again, which is it? Facism or a breath of fresh air?

  • harpo

    ‘In a democracy, no-one has a moral or political imperative to either condemn or condone, despite the attempts by deluded quasi-fascist journalists to censure, disenfranchise, defame, and harangue them into doing so.’

    The Dubliner:

    So why do the Provisionals, their media outlets and their supporters spend a great deal of their time doing just this when it comes to things involving nationalist suffering (real or imagined)? Are they quasi-fascists too?

    As usual this is the apex of Provisional hypocricy – they refuse to condemn acts by their armed wing, yet condemn anyone and everything else (when it suits them), and DO continually harangue others to join them in this condemnation.

    People will defend Ferris, saying she has the right not to condemn a specific incident, but if that’s true, then why are there constant calls for condemnation of other specific incidents? – Bloody Sunday, Finucane, Nelson, Ludlow, lots and lots of supposed securocrat-led collusion murders, etc etc etc.

    Why is PSF out there condemning such specific incidents (and asking others to condemn them) if they don’t play the politics of condemnation? As usual it’s one rule for them, another for everyone else.

  • harpo

    ‘Rarely have I seen such desperate sophistry as Dubliner’s post above.’

    Shore Road Resident:

    Amen. Well said.

    In one breath they ask for the freedom to not partake in the politics of condemnation, in the next they are condemning those who do ask for public figures to state their position on things.

  • harpo

    ‘So the last time a Labour or Tory minister here was asked to condemn the Bloody Sunday murders was when exactly?’

    Good for the Goose:

    I don’t know. Why don’t you get Daily Ireland or some other Provo organ right onto that? DI has the freedom to ask them it don’t they?

    Or is this simple whataboutery? ‘Since an RTE employee asked a Provisional such a question, whatabout them asking a British minister about Bloody Sunday?’ Is that it?

    I’d laugh my ass off if that did happen and the minister said he didn’t wish to engage in the politics of condemnation and that we should all move on past it. How would you like that attitude then? I’d say you’d go bananas about ‘the British avoiding the truth’.

    Indeed it is sauce for the goose.

  • harpo

    ‘You’ve changed your tune.

    Your first post said that the goal of asking such questions was to: “censure, disenfranchise, defame, harangue, etc, those who hold dissenting viewpoints”

    Now you say that such questions from interviewers would be “a breath of fresh air”.

    So which is it?’

    Shore Road Resident:

    Obviously in the 1984 world of Provisionalism the answer is ‘both’. When Provos are being questioned about the activities of their armed wing it is fascism, when British ministers are asked questions about agencies of HMG it’s a breath of fresh air.

    Take Bloody Sunday for example. If a unionist is asked to condemn it and they refuse it supposedly proves that unionists are bloodthirsty bigots who are on for the wholesale slaughter of Catholics. No mention of such a request to condemn it being fascism. No acceptance of such a unionist attitude being a ‘dissenting viewpoint’ is there?

    But ask a Provo rep about the McCabe murder and suddenly that’s fascism. It’s picking on people who have dissenting viewpoints.

    The truth is that it’s only Provisionals who are entitled to these dissenting viewpoints. The rest of us are supposedly just fascists if we challenge these dissenting viewpoints.

  • harpo

    Hello all

    This is harpo here.

    I don’t know why it happened, but I authored posts 11, 12, 13 and 14 and they have all appeared as being posted by ‘The Dubliner1’.

    Maybe this one will suffer the same fate.

  • Henry94

    It looks like the Northern Bank gang have struck again.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/kent/4739324.stm