1/3 of Republic’s houses under ten years old

Interesting piece in today’s Irish Times by Olivia Kelly, which has an obvious metric for the exponential growth (subs needed) of the state’s prosperity and population.

More that one third of houses in the State were built in the last 10 years, according to the latest figures from the Department of the Environment. Last year almost 81,000 houses were built, an increase of 5.2 per cent on 2004. It was the 11th consecutive year of record housing output. This brings the total number of houses built since 1995 to 548,000, which accounts for 34 per cent of all houses in the State.

  • eranu

    unfortunately alot of the new houses have a lot of partition walls inside. instead of solid brick. i lived in a house in dublin for a few months where i think even the wall between us and next door was a partition. i could here someone pull out the plug in next doors bedroom !

  • eranu
    my sympathies.
    We need an end to this false partition 🙂

  • eranu

    get rid of partition, build brick walls instead ! 🙂

  • seabhac siulach

    I’ve always wondered about who is buying all of these houses…surely, the population is not increasing that rapidly to require 81,000 new houses each year…is it all speculation, second homes?
    In the UK the number of new houses built each year is of the order of 250,000, that is, only 3 times the rate of the 26 counties for a country with 15 times the population. And, the UK housing market is still buoyant…
    What is going on? With all of this extra glut of housing coming onto the market should the price of housing not be falling, not rising? Perhaps an economist amongst ye could enlighten us…

  • ‘What is going on? With all of this extra glut of housing coming onto the market should the price of housing not be falling, not rising? Perhaps an economist amongst ye could enlighten us’

    The housing issue, especially in England is appalling for young people. For every few hundred that i save, the house prices have risen by a few thousand. I’m sure its the buy to let market and 2nd home market that puts up the prices. There is and will be a huge social rift between those who own property and those who can’t afford it, especially with the pensions crisis. For me, its like its my first go on the monopoly board but everything has been bought up, how do you survive?
    Mortgages are savings accounts for rich people. Its harsh logic but if you don’t earn enough to be granted a mortgage and buy a one bed flat here, about £150,000 which would cost about £800 in monthly repayments then you have to rent. How much does it cost to rent a one bed flat? £850 a month!
    The poor are paying more than the rich and will continue to do so. Oh and remember this is a meritocratic society, not just one where rich parents set their kids up in homes and others have to rent off them, my arse

  • Crataegus

    eranu

    We build partitions much better in the North

    Actually in all seriousness we probably do. (its party wall by the way)

    seabhac siulach

    They are not building enough in Britain and Ireland is playing catch up with demand. There are a number of reasons why we need more dwellings other than population increase; more people live by themselves; less people live with their parents or grand parents; they are living longer; smaller families therefore more units for the same size of population. Some people have second homes, but as a percentage of the overall it is probably quite low. Could you afford two mortgages?

    If building at the current rate continues in the South it will have a downward impact on house prices and that in turn will reduce the number built.

  • Crataegus

    cladycowboy

    You have my sympathy, yes buy to let is shoving up prices but it is so stupid because the house prices are now so high that often the return really is not there. I think a few taxes to deter this sector would be no bad thing.

    One of the problems in England is over demand in the South and no demand in large areas of the North (of England). Lack of any rational regional policy and just not enough houses being built. Serious skills shortage in the building industry and people are questioning its ability to construct the numbers needed.

    Advice buy something even if it is with friends. If you know what you are doing look for something that is decoratively dreadful but structurally sound and get stuck in.

  • Tochais Síoraí

    No need for an economist, seabhac. A few reasons cover most of the house building boom. Demography is one, the Irish population is younger than the British and houses are needed for all th enew immigrants. Also, there is an obsession with home ownership and new houses particularly in rural Ireland which doesn’t seem as pronounced in other societies (e.g look at GAA clubs and the way they place such a high priority on ground ownership) – maybe a sociologist more than an economist is needed.

    Another very big reason is that a lot of urbanites with too much money are building second houses either as holiday homes, to rent or simply left empty to use later. In many cases these are encouraged by tax incentive schemes to ‘develop’ certain areas. These schemes were particularly aimed at appeasing the Building lobby as they only apply to new houses and not renovating old ones. People can write off part of their income tax against the cost of house building with the result that a lot of rural Ireland is being defaced by ugly unused houses.

    As for the market get out the crystal ball, it depends on a load of things like immigration and increasing population, the Celtic Tiger, ECB interest rates etc. etc.

  • Brian Boru

    “I’ve always wondered about who is buying all of these houses…surely, the population is not increasing that rapidly to require 81,000 new houses each year…is it all speculation, second homes?
    In the UK the number of new houses built each year is of the order of 250,000, that is, only 3 times the rate of the 26 counties for a country with 15 times the population. And, the UK housing market is still buoyant…
    What is going on? With all of this extra glut of housing coming onto the market should the price of housing not be falling, not rising? Perhaps an economist amongst ye could enlighten us…”

    It is increasing to that level, due to our politicians insisting stubbornly on retaining an open-door for immigration from the new EU states, to whom 180,000 PPS no.s have been issued since EU Enlargement. There is some debate as to how many of these are still in Ireland. There are some claims by Garrett Fitzgerald that the evidence shows most leave after 10 months, and that we really only have 65,000 – 75,000 here, but I am not entirely convinced due to the Black economy. It has been speculated that in the UK, the 293,000 from Eastern EU who have registered to work are in fact half the real number who have come to the UK.

    And EU nationals doesn’t include the 27,000 non-EU nationals allowed in on work-permits. No wonder the builders are so delighted with all these immigrants, and they can exploit them too on the building site, where 20% of immigrant builders are misclassified as self-employed to avoid workers-rights legislation. Only 21 inspectors nationwide to monitor working conditions! Bah.

  • George

    Brian,
    are you saying it’s the fault of immigrants that we have a booming construction industry and housing market?

    I see Michael McDowell said the door will remain open and there will be now work permits introduced.

    Who’d have thought I’d be siding with McDowell on immigration issues and I never thought I’d see the day when I’d be quoting the Fianna Fáil ethos:

    “Fianna Fáil aims to unite all – the Irishman of a thousand generations and the stranger who is within our gate, in the words of Thomas Davis – in a common identity of self-confident Irish men and women in a dynamic, vibrant, prosperous nation.”

    You want to close the door on the stranger and your actions would close the door to a vibrant, dynamic and prosperous nation.

    Fortunately you and people who think like you don’t seem capable of doing anything to impose your will.

    See you at the ballot box in 2007 for the next round.

  • George

    Should read “no work permits introduced”.

  • Brian Boru

    George since you mention the next election I think it should be pointed out that a poll published yesterday shows 78% want to bring back work permits and only 24% say we should have more immigration. 43% say we have enough immigrants and should have no more, while 29% want the existing number reduced and say we have too much.

    BTW, I am unlikely to vote FF on this occasion so plz do not lump me in with their views. We have tried uniting the “stranger within our gates” for centuries and it didn’t work.