Everything began with images

Number 4 of 7 hits the movie screens this weekend and, with positive reviews, Sheila’s daring to hope, here’s another positive review btw. But there’s another contender warming up in the background, as I previously noted. Possibly connected to that forthcoming release, Adam Gopnik writing in the New Yorker has an interesting account of CS Lewis’ life, work and beliefs – the different views of the writer on either side of the Atlantic, his friendship with Tolkien and why the imagery of his best known work will always appealAn extract from the article –

For poetry and fantasy aren’t stimulants to a deeper spiritual appetite; they are what we have to fill the appetite. The experience of magic conveyed by poetry, landscape, light, and ritual, is . . . an experience of magic conveyed by poetry, landscape, light, and ritual. To hope that the conveyance will turn out to bring another message, beyond itself, is the futile hope of the mystic. Fairy stories are not rich because they are true, and they lose none of their light because someone lit the candle. It is here that the atheist and the believer meet, exactly in the realm of made-up magic. Atheists need ghosts and kings and magical uncles and strange coincidences, living fairies and thriving Lilliputians, just as much as the believers do, to register their understanding that a narrow material world, unlit by imagination, is inadequate to our experience, much less to our hopes.

The religious believer finds consolation, and relief, too, in the world of magic exactly because it is at odds with the necessarily straitened and punitive morality of organized worship, even if the believer is, like Lewis, reluctant to admit it. The irrational images—the street lamp in the snow and the silver chair and the speaking horse—are as much an escape for the Christian imagination as for the rationalist, and we sense a deeper joy in Lewis’s prose as it escapes from the demands of Christian belief into the darker realm of magic. As for faith, well, a handful of images is as good as an armful of arguments, as the old apostles always knew.

  • Alan

    I’m off to Potter this evening. I have a daughter who is a megafan. We ended up outside Waterstones at 12 midnight in June, but I wasn’t feeling indulgent about doing similar last night.

    It was an interesting queue in June – with one or two other inhabitants of the blogosphere standing beside over-excited childer. Of course they may also have been there for their own benefit.

  • Mark

    Went on Thursday and Saturday. By far the best adaptation so far.