Twelth march in Benidorm?

Enthusiastic holiday makers, most of them seemingly from Belfast, celebrated the twelth in Benedorm with an unofficial (and illegal) march. The celebrations were stopped by police after about ten minutes when they began to block the road. The organisers were fined €6,000 each for their trouble.

  • joe

    Impartial policing at its best. If only we had the same here.

  • hagrid

    I almost found this report funny!

    Seriously though, how would locals react if some islamic cultural organisation began to ‘fly-in’ die-hard fundamentalists onto the streets of Portavogie?

    Let it be, or not to let it be – is this reality?

  • Alan

    Thankfully, they’re no relations!

  • Wichser

    Chavfest ’05, festival of choice for the discerning Teddy Bear.

    Rack ‘n’ rawllllll

  • willowfield

    Is it not Benidorm?

  • Wichser

    That’s your holiday decided for next year then Willowfield, eh ?

  • Frank_Black

    Now that’s comedy at its finest! What the Hell did they think would happen? Still it is a logical progression. I mean once the thrill of marching in Catholic neighbourhoods back home wears off then taking the show on the road so to speak and marching in mosatly Catholic countries is the obvious next step.

    Next stop Vatican City….

  • Mick

    Thanks Willow. Benedorm is of course type of mattress. Will correct!

  • reality check

    what a disgusting display of sectarianism.Thankfully the perpetrators were reprimanded

  • Dessertspoon

    Very very very sad and probably very disappointing for all the NI residents who had gone to Spain to escape the 12th in the first place only to stumble across it on their way to the beach. Remind me not to go anywhere near there this time next year.

  • fair_deal

    There has been impromptu parades in Tenerife too the past few years but there has never been any trouble with the authorities there.

    A mate’s wife booked a holiday over the twelfth last year to tenerife (after 25 years of going to the Twelfth she fancied a change apparently and wanted some family time and not him slipping off with his mates).

    He said he was sitting at the breakfast table getting text messages from his mates collarette in pocket thoroughly peeved off. When suddenly two flag bearers and twenty guys in collarettes walk round the corner. He promptly scarpered off with them and by the time they had done a circuit they had about 50 guys and then had a big party. He said he’d chatted to a couple of local peelers and they said it’d happened before and there wasn’t a problem. Mind you he had a bit of a problem when he returned to the hotel.

  • Jo

    There is a pic of the organiser if you track back to the BT main page. Hope he stays out there!

  • reality check

    Vitriolic hatred of catholics fermented by loyalists spreads everywhere dosent it?the authorties should take a harder line on this issue.

  • beano; EverythingUlster.com

    “Vitriolic hatred of catholics fermented by loyalists”

    “display of sectarianism”

    Any evidence for any of this or is the fact that those in question were presumably protestant enough for you to dismiss them with insults?

    “an event, based on religious intolerance”

    Such an educated reading of history, indeed.

  • FantasticFoyle

    Why should this been seen or treated differently than the many St. Patrick’s Day parades that are held in other countries?

  • slackjaw

    Why should this been seen or treated differently than the many St. Patrick’s Day parades that are held in other countries?

    Because it was illegal. Are you suggesting that the authorities in Benidorm would not have imposed fines if the parade had been held on St Patrick’s Day and the paraders were wearing green?

  • la Dolorosa

    I thought people went on holiday over the twelfth fornight to get away from all the marches/parades etc…..

  • FantasticFoyle

    Why was this parade banned? Are there St. Patrick’s Day parades in Spain?

  • lib2016

    St. Patrick’s Day marches are acceptable celebrations of a nation’s identity, just as demonstrations on Bastille Day or the Fourth of July would be.

    The Orange Day marches, especially in the present climate get lumped in with the KKK or extreme Islamic displays. If unionists and Orangemen in particular want to appear in a less threatening light they will have to begin by accepting the need for change, as some have already done in Derry.

    It’s simple and pretty basic really – respect has to be earned. Paddy’s Day even in New York wasn’t held in very high esteem for a long time and the anti-gay rules there have squandered much good will recently.

    Given Paisley’s displays over the years just how much respect has Ulster unionism/ the Orange Order shown for the largest single religious group in Europe, let alone in a Catholic country like Spain.

    If I was a religious man I might call it ‘karma’. 😉

  • slackjaw

    Why was this parade banned?

    Does it matter? Spain is not Belfast or Portadown. Would it be reasonable for Spanish people to demand that Belfast pubs remain open until 5 in the morning because that is what happens in Benidorm?

    Are there St. Patrick’s Day parades in Spain?

    Interestingly enough, St. Patrick is a patron saint of the region of Murcia, a few hours down the road from Benidorm. I don’t know if they have a parade in his honour.

  • FantasticFoyle

    “The Orange Day marches, especially in the present climate get lumped in with the KKK or extreme Islamic displays”

    They get lumped together by people that don’t understand the OO and/or the KKK. The terrorist activities of the KKK have more in common with the UVF, IRA, etc. than they do with the OO.

    “Why was this parade banned?”
    “Does it matter?”

    It certainly does if St. Patrick’s Day parades are allowed.

  • slackjaw

    It certainly does if St. Patrick’s Day parades are allowed.

    It doesn’t. People in Spain are entitled to allow St. Patrick’s Day parades and ban Orange parades (or vice-versa) as they see fit. The Queen’s Highway does not stretch as far as Valencia, however much some people may wish to believe.

    Do I have the right to stage a bull-fight in Lisburn?

  • Young Fogey

    I’ve been threatened (for no reason other than the part of Belfast I’m from) by Loyalist thugs in Bodrum in Turkey. Some people don’t know when to leave things behind them.

  • lib2016

    “They get lumped together by people who don’t understand the OO and/or the KK”

    No doubt there was a little man in Mississipi saying the same thing at the height of the Drumcree riots.

    The unionist/Orange Order community pick the most notorious sectarian bigot in Europe to be their leader and then wonder why nobody loves them.

    Remember the Austrian experience a few years ago when they elected a certain President with an interesting past? Don’t blame the rest of the world for judging you by the friends you keep. The rest of us don’t just judge the politican but also the people who elected him.

  • maca

    Personally, if i’m abroad on hols and want to celebrate a holiday from back home (such as Paddy’s Day or whatever) i’d rather organise a BBQ and a piss-up. But that’s just me I guess…

    Anyway i’d feel like a right flute parading around some foreign city like that, it may be different if you’d a thousand locals joining in or something…

  • Valenciano

    The community of Valencia (which includes Benidorm) doesn’t celebrate St Patrick’s Day. It falls smack bang in the middle of one of the biggest festivals in Spain (Las Fallas) so locals are too busy doing their own stuff. Murcia doesn’t celebrate it either.

    In fact marches are a very rare event. Locals that I’ve spoken definitely are not friends of the OO and still seemed a bit bemused after I’d tried to explain to them the nuances behind it all.

    Additionally, anyone who thinks that by going to Benidorm they’ll escape from nutters from NI is not exactly the sharpest tool in the shed!

  • FantasticFoyle

    “People in Spain are entitled to allow St. Patrick’s Day parades and ban Orange parades (or vice-versa) as they see fit. The Queen’s Highway does not stretch as far as Valencia, however much some people may wish to believe.
    Do I have the right to stage a bull-fight in Lisburn”

    I am comparing the freedom (or lack thereof) of speech & expression when it comes to Irish and British nationalism that is displayed in foreign (especially EU) countries. Pubs and bull-fights are not what I am getting at. But since you mentioned it, I think that a bull fight in Lisburn would be a brilliant idea.

  • Valenciano

    F.Foyle, I think that compared to UK/Ireland, Spanish people are extremely tolerant – probably too much so in fact. If holiday resorts and coastal towns in these islands were taken over every summer by obnoxious Spanish drunks fighting and vomiting in the street don’t you think that the tabloid press would go apeshit about it? Yet that’s what happens every Summer in Spain.

    Worse than that is some of the long termers, many of whom are actually proud of the fact that they’ve lived there several years without knowing any of the local language. How you can live in a place for four years without knowing the local word for Town Hall is beyond me, but I’ve met 2 Brits before on the bus who didn’t!

    They may have to put up with it for economic reasons, but why should they tolerate the importation of our pathetic local feuds?

  • La Dolorosa

    Valenciano – de acuerdo!

    I couldn’t agree with you more. I am a big hispanofile and it really galls me that for some Spain represents a 2 week drink fest in the sun with a bit of Ole on the side.

    It’s funny that when there are posts/discussions about immigrants etc thet never focus on the hundreds of thousands of ex pats whohave ‘flooded’ the Costas and have not bothered to make any effort to integrate or learn the regional /national language/s…

  • Young Fogey

    I am comparing the freedom (or lack thereof) of speech & expression when it comes to Irish and British nationalism that is displayed in foreign (especially EU) countries.

    I could try and think of an answer to this, but Winston Churchill actually said it better back in 1920:

    The world does not care about Northern Ireland. People in Spain have other things to worry about. I doubt they think very much about Irish or British nationalism, but remember than insofar as they do the ETA-IRA links has inoculated it against the kind of naive IRA sympathy one sees in other countries occasionally. I’ve seen or heard of Northern Ireland related violence in just about every country in the Mediterranean, and I just wish the local police would given them all a good beating.

    Stop navel gazing folks. Nobody cares.

  • lib2016

    The thing is that we are part of Europe and people do indeed care. Unionists have become so hardened to their own sectarianism that they simply don’t realise how they are perceived by the rest of the world.

    I’m not excusing or condoning republican violence but it doesn’t have the same shocking impact since its roots are firmly in the modern period rather than the Middle Ages.

    The South African regime didn’t realise that their racial prejudices would unite most of the world against them. Religious wars are just so 16th Century, lads. You’re just not regarded as ‘decent people’, sorry. The ANC won the sympathy of decent people and republicans……..!

  • Young Fogey

    The thing is that we are part of Europe and people do indeed care.

    Please show me some evidence that people in the rest of Europe:

    a. care at all, and;
    b. are basically more sympathetic to Nationalists.

    If you can show me any evidence beyond the usual “I’m a Marxist and I support all revolutionary movements everywhere” brigade I’ll eat my hat.

    Unionists have become so hardened to their own sectarianism that they simply don’t realise how they are perceived by the rest of the world.

    Most people don’t even know they exist.

  • Tone

    How you can live in a place for four years without knowing the local word for Town Hall is beyond me, but I’ve met 2 Brits before on the bus who didn’t!

    What’s this about Brits travelling across the sea and not making an effort to integrate into the local community?

  • lib2016

    Personal experience in a number of European countries has taught me that people are very aware of what’s happening in Ireland. If you think that so many of us pay extra for a Southern passport simply for sentimental reasons then you’re frankly out of touch.

    The Rev. Ian has been a subject of fascinated horror ‘on the Continent’ since at least 1966 when I watched him and an associated mob attack a nationalist area (the Markets, I think) on Dutch TV.

    There have been many many other highlights given the unionist flair for publicity. Who could forget the Doc’s exit from the European Parliament on the occasion of the Pope’s visit?

    Or an entire room-full of foreign correspondents exploding in laughter when Chicester Clarke explained that the RUC were ‘the finest police force in the world’ and would investigate themselves. This just after we’d watched film of the same force using guns against unarmed civilians.

    So many chances for unionism to dig it’s own grave, and they took every one.

    Can you find me any citizen of Europe who wouldn’t recognise a Paisley impression?

  • Young Fogey

    If you think that so many of us pay extra for a Southern passport simply for sentimental reasons then you’re frankly out of touch.

    My Irish passport costs less than my British one in any case and I have it for the very pragmatic reason that I travel a lot in the Middle East and like my limbs the way they are.

    Can you find me any citizen of Europe who wouldn’t recognise a Paisley impression?

    Yes. The overwhelming majority. Who are you talking about? The highly educated, left-wing, metropolitan elites of places like Amsterdam and Copenhagen? A culturally important group, I agree, but hardly representative of the vast majority of people in Europe. Most people, even in Western Europe, don’t even speak more than basic English.

    Valenciano – how many of your mates in Cafe Musical would recognise a Paisley impression.

  • maca

    lib2016
    “Personal experience in a number of European countries has taught me that people are very aware of what’s happening in Ireland”

    Well really it’s very mixed. I know some people with some degree of knowledge of NI and others with absolutely zero knowledge of NI. Truth is, most people just aren’t interested enough to learn about NI, why should they be?

  • lib2016

    Hmm – maybe I did overstate my case and most people don’t know the details. They DO know however that England is a big country bullying a small one and that Irish unionists (as personified by Paisley) are crap. You could argue that they slightly over-simplify the situation but they wouldn’t listen to you cause they don’t like you.

  • willowfield

    slackjaw

    The Queen’s Highway does not stretch as far as Valencia

    No, but the King’s Highway does.

    lib2016

    The unionist/Orange Order community pick the most notorious sectarian bigot in Europe to be their leader …

    The nationalist/Provo community pick the most notorious sectarian terrorist in Europe to be their leader …

    Tone

    What’s this about Brits travelling across the sea and not making an effort to integrate into the local community?

    The same could be said about Catholic Irish.

  • lib2016

    ‘The nationalist/Provo community pick the most notorious sectarian terrorist in Europe to be their leader’

    The Guardia Civil are rounding up the owners of all the Irish bars as we speak! Seriously though, if you can substantiate your post then take your evidence to the appropriate authorities. It’s not true and what’s worse, you know it’s not true.

    Paisley is, whether unionists like it or not and whether it’s true or not, seen as a sectarian demagogue.

    Adams, who would not be nearly as well known abroad, is frequently seen as a peacemaker.

    I’m not saying that it’s fair but that’s the way it is.

  • willowfield

    It’s not true and what’s worse, you know it’s not true.

    On the contrary, it is true and I know it to be true. As do you.

    Paisley is, whether unionists like it or not and whether it’s true or not, seen as a sectarian demagogue.

    Adams is, whether nationalists like it or not and whether it’s true or not [which it is], seen as a sectarian terrorist.

    Adams, who would not be nearly as well known abroad, is frequently seen as a peacemaker.

    Adams is far more well-known than Paisley. He may frequently be seen as a peacemaker, but he’s also known as a terrorist.

    I’m not saying that it’s fair but that’s the way it is.

    I am saying it is fair, and that’s the way it is.

  • Valenciano

    “Valenciano – how many of your mates in Cafe Musical would recognise a Paisley impression.”

    Well YF you’ve been in my wonderful former local in question, so to put it another way how many of them spoke English? Hardly any of them. The barman probably had the best level and even then of the 12 levels available in the main English language exam (Trinity) he’d struggle to pass grade 5. So this idea of Valencians understanding, let alone laughing into their San Miguels, at the Paisley impressionist in the corner on a Friday night, is probably the most laughable thing that I’ve ever read on here (and there has been some dross posted in those 2 years.)

    Lib2016, do be serious please. How many people in your local boozer would know, let alone recognise an impression of, an equivalent figure such as Maria San Gil? Or even Ibarretxe? I’d buy you a pint if you could even find one. Yet the latter is arguably a better known and more important figure in European politics. Sadly you’re only showing your own pariochialism. I’ve been in 20 EU countries in the past 3 years and they are not full of people who are highly clued up on NI, though you will find a tiny handful that do know what its about. Most couldn’t give a flying f### about NI never mind take sides in it all.

    WF does have a point as Adams is better known than Paisley and more than once I’ve heard him referred to as “el caudillo de IRA” or IRA absolute leader by Spaniards.

    Willowfield: “The Queen’s Highway does not stretch as far as Valencia. No, but the King’s Highway does.”

    Not sure what point you’re making there WF, as under the statute of autonomy of July 1982, the decision on who can occupy that highway rests with the local council in Alicante. Did they permit the march? No. Was it illegal? Yes. But according to my mother, the Ibrox bar owner announced on UTV that he’s going to defy the ban (haven’t been able to confirm this so it’s hearsay admittedly) but if it is true than he deserves to have the book thrown at him for his flagrant disrespect of his host’s wishes. Benidorm may be many things including tacky tourist trap but Costa Del Drumcree it ain’t so I wouldn’t pack the Christmas tree or “We will walk Benidorm” T-Shirt next time you go there.

  • lib2016

    Valencio

    Sorry but I can only judge by my own experience. Paisley is known and disliked by the older agegroup all over Western Europe. Adams is better known in Spain because of the ETA connection.

    I have already said that people are not well informed about the details so I don’t understand your need to tell me that. Most of them don’t like what they DO know of British tactics in NI and they DO understand that Britain has been fighting a dirty war here for a long long time. Hell – even most of the British know that!

  • lib2016

    BTW I enjoyed your idea that someone would have to speak English to understand Paisley. Didn’t you see his performance in Brussels? 😉

  • Valenciano

    Well I don’t know Lib I never met many young people on the continent who really knew who either Adams or Paisley were, but as you say it is all subjective and with the lack of empirical evidence there’s not much more we can say on it.

    You mean Paisley’s protest against the pope? Well it was about 1988 and there have been other eccentric politicians in the chamber in the nearly two decades since.

    ((It was hilarious though!!!)) 😉

  • slug

    Reading this thread makes me think that some people are somewhat self-serving in the way they think others percieve them.

    Apart from the McCartney murder – which did nothing for Adams perception – NI has been off the news for about the last 5 years. People have short memories. The troubles are fast becoming an obscure part of Irish history of no interest to Europeans. Gerry Adams and Ian Paisley with them.

  • Stephen Copeland

    Is it not Benidorm?

    Posted by: willowfield at July 21, 2005 12:15 PM

    And, is it not, correctly speaking, the twelfth, not the ‘twelth’?

    Or was the dialect version deliberate?

  • Veritas

    Ningún paso para manifestantes sectarios

  • lib2016

    ‘….NI has been off the news for about the last 5 years.)

    Let’s not hide the unionist light under a bushel (Is that sufficiently biblical?) I don’t think many of the people who saw the pictures of Holy Cross have forgotten them quite that quickly.

  • VICTOR1

    How in the name of fiddle did the McCartney murder creep into this thread ? As for the Barcelona thing let them march it won’t be long before the july holiday season turns Barcelona into a January season…..deserted!!

  • Tampico

    Back to the issue at hand, whilst the marchers might have been better advised to at least contact the Police before hand, I don’t see what the objection is. The declarations of sectarianism on this thread directed at the Prods are no doubt from the usual suspects. If Paddy’s Day marches can take place in Chicago, NYC etc etc and Bastille Day celebrations can take place in Killyleagh County Down (Don’t ask me why) then why not Orange marches in Spain. There are Orange marches in every Orange jurisdiction in the world, Togo and all.

  • lib2016

    Nobody as far as I know, certainly nobody on this thread objects to Prods. The only objections are to unionist/Orange Order sectarianism and illegal marches.

    Maybe we’d take the regular references to Togo and other parts of the worldwide Orange Empire more seriously if we saw some evidence of the Orange Order fighting racism closer to home in say The Village, for example.

    I do welcome the fact that some elements of Orangeism accept the need for change and even the need to talk to the residents. Let’s be honest and admit that there’s a lot of need for everybody, Orange and Green to change their attitudes.

    The Orange Order in particular need to accept that many Protestants detest everything they stand for. It’s not just atheists like myself or even Catholics who are offended by them.

  • GavBelfast

    Lib, outside of Northern Ireland apart from those who keep a particularly close eye on things, I doubt if anyone retains any image of those part of the world from the past ten years apart, perhaps, from Omagh after the bomb and maybe Bono with Trimble and Hume, arms aloft.

    We are that needle in Europe’s/the world’s haystack, yet still feeling self-important or to shout “me, me, me” or “us, us, us” every so often.

  • Young Fogey

    They DO know however that England is a big country bullying a small one

    That perception is indeed the most common one. The most bizarre variant of it I encountered was in Georgia where they tend to be anti-Catholic (remember the Second Crusade!!!) and therefore assumed that the IRA were Prods.

    and that Irish unionists (as personified by Paisley) are crap.

    No, I really don’t think they’ve heard of him. And in a lot of cases don’t quite get the fact that there are really Irish Unionists, instead the conflict is either England v Ireland or a purely religious conflict.

    You could argue that they slightly over-simplify the situation but they wouldn’t listen to you cause they don’t like you.

    I’m not a Unionist so I don’t see what you’re driving at here.

  • Brian Boru

    Well rules are rules. Sorry.

  • maca

    Tampico
    “If Paddy’s Day marches can take place in Chicago, NYC etc etc and Bastille Day celebrations can take place in Killyleagh County Down (Don’t ask me why) then why not Orange marches in Spain”

    The point is though, that it is up to the Spanish whether or not they allow such parades. In this case they said no, as is their right and that should be respected.
    It’s got nothing to do with Paddy’s Day marches in Chicago or anywhere else.

  • slug

    “most people don’t know the details. They DO know however that Irish unionists (as personified by Paisley) are crap.”

    Crap, eh?

  • Wichser

    Opposition to the Orange Order is a minimum condition for qualification as an opponent of sectarian hatred in Northern Ireland. It’s not in and of itself the long and short of it all of course, there is vicuous catholic bigotry to face down also whether natioanlists and/or republicans like it or even acknowledge it or not but it is a necessary precondition for qualification nonetheless.

    No more with the deluded opportunistic ‘party of esteem’ lies, those of us with sense and humanity in our hearts ain’t buying it.

  • biffo

    firstly Spain has more holidays than most of us from St Patrick to St George day its something like 24 in the year. Secondly what about the ulstermen who have moved their set up home had kids born their that would like to keep their heritage alive their is peasefull 12 th celebrations all round the world from ireland in a whole to canada from scotland to new zealand so why not spain long may it continue

  • biffo

    firstly Spain has more holidays than most of us from St Patrick to St George day its something like 24 in the year. Secondly what about the ulstermen who have moved their set up home had kids born their that would like to keep their heritage alive their is peasefull 12 th celebrations all round the world from ireland in a whole to canada from scotland to new zealand so why not spain long may it continue

  • willowfield

    Lib

    Sorry but I can only judge by my own experience. Paisley is known and disliked by the older agegroup all over Western Europe. Adams is better known in Spain because of the ETA connection.

    Adams is known all over Europe too. And among all age groups. And better known.

    Most of them don’t like what they DO know of British tactics in NI and they DO understand that Britain has been fighting a dirty war here for a long long time.

    Actually, it was the terrorism that people remember and most people were appalled by it, and happy to learn that it has (almost) stopped. If they have opinions about the security response to it, they probably think it wasn’t tough enough. The average person doesn’t like terrorism, you know.

    Your misrepresentations are laughable. Do a bit of travelling and speak to people.

    Nobody as far as I know, certainly nobody on this thread objects to Prods. The only objections are to unionist/Orange Order sectarianism and illegal marches.

    Are the objections to illegal marches per se? Or just illegal Orange marches?

    Wichser

    Opposition to the Orange Order is a minimum condition for qualification as an opponent of sectarian hatred in Northern Ireland.

    Says who? It seems to me that opposition to the Orange Order is actually a symptom of sectarian hatred. Witness Ardoyne.

  • Wichser

    Willowfield

    A symptom ?!

    Please explain.

  • lib2016

    Young Fogey

    As I haven’t been to Eastern Europe (yet) I’m happy to take your word for it that they see things differently there.

    wichser

    There is bigotry on all sides, including as I’d be the first to admit, from committed opponents of organised religion like myself. All we can do is the best we know. Honest debate, and it happens now and again even on Slugger, can help us to examine our ideas and that’s the attraction here for me.

    Slug; Crap,eh?

    That’s the public perception. As I’ve pointed out earlier in this thread it may not be fair or even correct but that’s the way (it seems to me) in which unionism is perceived.

    What’s interesting for me about this thread is the dogged determination of most unionists in denying the public perception of them, and the refusal to accept that they are not seen as ‘decent people’, even apparently by the NI electorate.

    As for Willowfield’s kind suggestion that I should travel a bit. I’ve worked and lived in five Western European countries and came back last Sunday morning from my most recent stay in Spain. Not a lot of travel I admit, but then again I did try to open my mind while I travelled.

  • reality check

    the idiot who was behind the parade was on tv last night and stated even if he couldn’t get the relevant permission to parade next twelfth he would do it anyway regardless.You can take them out of ulster but you can’t take the ulster out of them.How very true in this case

  • Biffo

    Willowfield

    “The same could be said about Catholic Irish.”

    No it couldn’t.

  • Valenciano

    Victor, in relative terms in terms of Spain, Benidorm is nowhere near Barcelona, it’s about 5 hours drive away.

    Biffo, there many Europeans who lament the fact that they can’t drink in a bar until they’re 21 in the USA, some Dutch who probably wish they could have a toke in other countries, many Spanish who wish they could keep British bars open all night, many tourists who wish they could smoke in Dublin pubs etc etc. The difference between them and those in question in this instance is that they don’t arrogantly break the local law to assert their right to preserve aspects of their culture.

    You want to do things the way they do them back home? Then don’t move abroad to a country that forbids it. Simple.

  • Biffo

    Valenciano

    “Biffo…You want to do things the way they do them back home?”

    No, It wasn’t me who posted the comment you refer to, someone else made the comment and used my slugger moniker. It’s obviously an easy thing to do.

    Sad person, my opions must annoy someone who post here.

    The only thing I have to say about this particular issue is that it’s just another international embarrassment for us Nordies.

  • alas

    Not surprising the loyalist march started at the Ibrox bar in Benidorm, it was Jim Gray’s favourite haunt when he was over topping up his suntan.

  • Manuel

    The world knows these are nothing but BNP/KKK/nazi loving parades…culture as if?
    Bye Bye….

  • Realist

    Manuel,

    “The world knows these are nothing but BNP/KKK/nazi loving parades…culture as if?
    Bye Bye….”

    Perhaps you should inform the African Orange Lodges of this?

    Adios.

  • darthrumsfeld

    Manuel knows nothing- he’s from barcelona

  • Concerned Loyalist

    “Realist”,
    Catch a grip mate. You can lump the Provos in with fanatical terrorists like ETA and the PLO, but you can’t justify associating the Orange Order with the BNP or the KKK. Your ignorance and misrepresentation of Protestant and Loyalist culture shocks and astounds me…

  • Concerned Loyalist

    You too Manuel, you need to read up on the Order’s great history, and how brave Orangemen, with sashes worn proudly, died in the First World War at the Battle of the Somme, to keep Europe free from fascism and Nazism, and their neo-Nazi cousins such as Combat 18.

    They didn’t die for White Anglo-Saxon Protestants, but for a multi-racial, multi-faith Europe…

  • lanny

    people go to Benidorm just for this parade. My parents go every year and its fab! Catholics just want something else to wine about. Give it a rest now for gods sake. People who run the Ibrox Bar are good decent people, just trying to celebrate their heritage and why shouldnt we? Catholics celebrate their heritage – why cant we?

  • stacy

    the parade that left the ibrox bar on the 12th july was fantastic, it wasnt sectarian it was a gr8 family day out, the walk went ahead and there was no trouble. god sake we have a celtic bar in the same street as us and there are friends!!!!!!
    so all u idiots out there that are makin comments about this bar GROW UP!!!!