Marathon back on through the West

Looks like the fuss made by Daily Ireland and others at the proposed re-routing of the Belfast Marathon to avoid hilly west Belfast has paid off.

  • Oilbhear_Chromaill

    The problem with people like the organisers of the marathon – as with the backers of the development of Long Kesh – is they don’t realise what they’re throwing away.

    People come from all over the world to taste the history of the Falls Road and the Shankill. Few additional marathon runners would come here, in my opinion, because the race is being run through a non descript park on the foreshore.

    It’s also hilarious to listen Lisburn ‘city’ councillors crow over their Belfast counterparts about the coup of getting the ‘national stadium’ to Long Kesh. They talks as if people will stop to shop in Lisburn on the way to or from events in LK. The only reason people will want to make a point of going to the new development is to visit the museum – as long as its worthy of the history it’s supposed to represent and interpret. The North’s recent history is its unique selling point – no one wants to travel to shop in the Bow Street Mall.

  • Davros

    Good points O_C

  • Dessertspoon

    “The only reason people will want to make a point of going to the new development is to visit the museum”

    Not to watch the football, rugby or various GAA sports then!!??

  • Oilbhear_Chromaill

    The British Government have only concocted this idea of a ‘national’ stadium to deflect attention away from the museum to commemorate the troubles. After all it doesn’t want to be portrayed in any sort of a display as protagonists in a conflict and if the museum is truthful to its story that’s what will happen.

    What games worth talking about or attending would be held there? The GAA is unlikely to move its big games there in the short term for a complex of reasons.

  • Davros

    The British Government have only concocted this idea of a ‘national’ stadium to deflect attention away from the museum to commemorate the troubles.

    Have you any evidence to support this assertion? You could be right, I’m not disputing the points.

  • Dessertspoon

    That makes sense. Build a stadium that will cost a fortune just to deflect attention away from a museum. I don’t think so.

    That said I hope you are right and the museum accurately reflects the history it’s meant to represent. I also hope it serves as a lesson to why the type of conflict and bigotry that has exisited here is not the way forward and belongs firmly in the past.

  • GavBelfast

    Of course this is a good outcome, for it is best that a route should take in as much that is varied and representative of the city as a whole. Good, too, that everyone now seems to be happy.

    But will there ever be a day when something goes ‘against’ west Belfast that isn’t seen or leapt-upon by so-called representatives of people there, or outlets like the Angrytown News as ALWAYS an example of discrimination/oppression/whatever? Pathetic or what?

    The original decision may have been short-sighted, but it was taken with the best interests of the runners in question.

  • Dualta

    This is great news. I miss the days we would sit in the Dunville Park having an aul swally and playing ‘Spot the Prod’ during the marathon. It was dead easy, they were the ones sprinting.

  • Unmasked

    This is great news. I miss the days we would sit in the Dunville Park having an aul swally and playing ‘Spot the Prod’ during the marathon. It was dead easy, they were the ones sprinting.

    LOL!!

  • Mario

    I never knew that Belfast was hilly, it certainly does not seem that way from the route I have seen on line of the Marathon. I have ran in two Marathons in the states, San Francisco, and Seattle, Seattle’s is quite hilly, surprisingly more so than San Francisco’s. I have also ran two here Argentina.

    Running up hills is not bad for the runners, unless of course you have not trained properly or are a first time Marathoner and running down hill is more of a rest. I agree with one poster that said that a Marathon should take in more of a city, but trust me by mile 20, you dont really care about the view.

    Most Marathoners dont mind hills, unless theyre new comers and as long as its not in the last miles, you should be ok. Adequate Marathon training requires that you run hills. If this decision was based on runner’s interest, they must not have been serious runners which are usually the ones that complaint about hills. The problem with wimpy runners is that they dont respect the distance and dont train properly. No offence to first time runners on Slugger.

  • Occasional Commenter

    This will be my second marathon, I did Dublin in October. I’m clearly not that experienced, but I know enough to agree with Mario. Once you’re fit enough to struggle up the hills without having to walk, no matter how slow you have to run to do so, it’s nothing to complain about. You feel as if you’ve achieved something when you’ve done it, and you look forward to the downhill. According to some, the variety of running styles might mean that you’re using different parts of your leg muscles, which might actually make it easier than a flat route.

  • slackjaw

    Agree with Occasional Commenter and Mario about tackling hills. Once you get used to them they form part of the circuit and you take them in your stride, so to speak. Funny enough I dread sharp declines more these days than steep slopes, cos it feels like the former does more damage to the joints.

  • Occasional Commenter

    slackjaw, do you get shin splints? I apply ice to my shins for about 5 minutes after a long run. I haven’t got shin splints since I started doing that.

  • Davros

    and you guys do this for “pleasure ” ?
    I’ll stick with smoking my pipe 🙂

  • slackjaw

    O_C

    They used to cause me a lot of difficulty when I started running properly about 5 or so years ago, forcing me to give up training for marathons on a couple of occasions, so I have had to change my running style a fair bit to try and avoid them. Lucky enough I haven’t had any problems recently – they’re a curse. These days the problem is with the impact on my knees 🙂

  • Gonzo

    The British Government have only concocted this idea of a ‘national’ stadium to deflect attention away from the museum to commemorate the troubles.

    The stadium (we can drop the ‘national’ if it keeps republicans happy – and that’s what all this is partly about) idea has been about a lot longer than an H-block museum.

    I would go so far as to turn it around; the museum is only going ahead to keep republicans on board with the stadium – ie the Government is trying to keep the GAA sweet.

    Doesn’t everyone realise by now that when ‘themmuns’ get a sweetie, ‘usuns’ must have some candy too? Welcome to the pathetic world of zero-sum politics folks.

    However, I imagine that while the museum will get the go-ahead no matter what, getting agreement between the football, rugby and gaelic associations will be nigh-on impossible.

    Still, the site will make a nice business park or retail outlet when the plans are finally abandoned.

  • Davros

    Still, the site will make a nice business park or retail outlet when the plans are finally abandoned.

    We could be really adventurous and make it Ireland’s first Gaeltacht Shopping Mall/Industrial Unit !