Struggle was about maintaining cohesion…

Danny Morrison continues to pull in good reviews from the UK’s national press. Today Dominic Cavendish files another one for the Daily Telegraph:

At a time when the IRA’s reputation has sunk to a new low following the murder of the Belfast man Robert McCartney, Morrison’s play reminds us that the “struggle” was always as much about retaining internal cohesion as it was about fighting external foes. Transporting us to Belfast of 1984, he centres the action on a bunch of Provos who, far from being united by the uncompromising tactics of the Thatcher government, are riven by paranoia thanks to the security services’ determination to lean on suspects and get them to turn “supergrass”.

  • Dualta

    Morrison’s play reminds us that the “struggle” was always as much about retaining internal cohesion as it was about fighting external foes.

    A fair point indeed. It could also be said that the struggle itself became the struggle. Issues such as the prisoners, state brutality against Republicans in response to IRA actions and the deeply questionable legislative approach to violence created many sub-struggles which, in turn, justified in the minds of Republicans the armed struggle.