Orde: we are the professionals – not Sinn Fein!

Hugh Orde in response to Sinn Fein criticism at the way he’s investigating the McCartney case: “There is no point bringing someone in who then, quite properly, if a suspect exercises their right to silence and says nothing. That does not develop the case”.

  • Pat Mc Larnon

    Given that these people deal in evidence only one has to wonder why the went on their well publicised trawling exercise over the Xmas period following the Northern Raid. Caution seemed to have been thrown to the wind on that occasion in order to get republicans into the frame.

  • Circles

    You can criticise MMcG’s media appearances of late all you want – PC Orde still takes the prize.
    Always ready with one of his incisive comments, he appears to be so busy chasing the baddies, and yet he still manages to squeeze in a few of his politically balanced, based on purely operational procedures, comments.

  • Jacko

    The apparatchik criticisms of Orde are getting thinner by the day – time for another session in Room 101 lads.

  • Jimmy Sands

    The provos have as much business telling the police how to investigates crimes as the police would have telling the provos how to commit them.

  • Circles

    But some of the old boys I’m sure could give some good lectures – “how to pass on information to murderers”, “punishment beatings without the bruises? RUC interrogation techniques”, “Quick convictions though evidence fabrication”…
    I think they could both learn a lot from each other.

  • Pat Mc Larnon

    The trolls are back it seems.

  • Jacko

    Yeah Pat, I noticed you were here.

  • Mick Fealty

    Boys, boys try to keep it cool. For what’s worth, Jimmy’s line is Quote of the week!

  • PaddyCanuck

    “There is no point bringing someone in who then, quite properly, if a suspect exercises their right to silence and says nothing. That does not develop the case”.

    Here we go, Orde has the crystal ball out again, how does he know the chief suspect was going to excercise his right to silence?

    Did the detective have to bring a loaf back to the wife? Was it near home time (no overtime you know!). How on earth can a chief constable get away with a statement, that they did not want to waste police time (by interviewing the chief suspect), in probably the most high profile murder case in the world, because there was a possibility that the witness may have excercised his right to silence… Answer that.

    This comes from a chief constable, who is really on the ball in this case. The last time he spoke out, he said that the chief suspects had left the jurisdiction, only for this to be denied by a colleague a couple of hours later.

    There is either political malice involved in the mishandling of this case, or gross incompetency. Going on past form, I side wit the former.

  • Henry94

    Aside from the issues republicans have with policing I think it is quite clear that the PSNI aren’t very good at their job.

    Unionists can, and have, argued that there intelligence gathering capacity has been undermined by the reforms but whatever the reasons the fact is they are bad.

    But unionists still give fairly uncritical political suppport to the PNSI. That’s understandable. Backing the police is an instictive reflex and “my enemies enemy is my friend” thinking is also a feature.

    But down the road I’d hate to see a situation where we had an agreed but crap service. Because in reality what happened in the McCartney case is not that unusual in the modern world.

    People don’t want to get involved. It happens in Dublin and London as well as Belfast. The busy toilet comment is not new and was not coined in the north.

  • Pat Mc Larnon

    Orde is an bit of a joker but his latest display of humour really takes the biscuit. To call the PSNI ‘professional’ was more akin to Frank Carson.

  • Roger W. Christ XVII

    Circle reminisces : “But some of the old boys I’m sure could give some good lectures – “how to pass on information to murderers”, “punishment beatings without the bruises? RUC interrogation techniques” “

    Isn’t it fortunate that the RUC no longer exist in their old form, that they don’t commit punishment beatings and that they will now face serious trouble if they beat up suspects. But I’ll not stop you harking back to the old days.

  • alex s

    Orde is an bit of a joker but his latest display of humour really takes the biscuit. To call the PSNI ‘professional’ was more akin to Frank Carson.

    Posted by: Pat Mc Larnon

    Pat, give us some evidence, back up your claims

  • alex s

    The incidence of fatal shootings are of particular interest, dropping from 30 to 19. Another important statistic is the rate of police fatal police shootings. This was 0.48 per 1,000 New York cops in 1998; a figure exceeded by Washington, D.C., Dallas, Philadelphia, Chicago, etc. Taken from http://www.brookesnews.com

    The above figures refer to 1998, remember there are about 7500 in the PSNI, that would equate to 3-4 fatal shootings per year, so far I believe the PSNI have been involved in 1

  • Cthulhu

    Orde: we are the professionals

    Professional *WHATs* is the important question…

  • Clady Cowboy

    I have to agree with that ugly thing Orde. The RUC/PSNI are by far the more professional murderers on this island after the glorious SAS that is!!!

  • J Kelly

    The PSNI are professionals and they have spent 31680 policing hours of the 45 top detectives in trying to solve the Northern Bank Robbery and by the way they knew who done it from day one or so they would have us believe. The biggest crime this organisation has had to solve in years and they put a guy in charge who is six months fron retirement doen’t seem to professional to me.

    Keystone is probably a more fitting description.

  • Pat Mc Larnon

    ales s,

    evidence of what exactly? Orde being a joker, or the claim being akin to Frank Carson.