Address to the Unco Guid

Thousands of Ulster folk will be celebrating Rabbie Burns this evening. The Ulster-Scots Agency has a very good piece on Burns – The Ulster Connection. May I wish everyone a pleasant Burns Night.

Selkirk Grace

Some hae meat and cannot eat.
Some cannot eat that want it:
But we hae meat and we can eat,
Sae let the Lord be thankit.

Address to a Haggis.

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o the puddin’-race!
Aboon them a’ ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy of a grace
As lang’s my arm.

The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
In time o need,
While thro your pores the dews distil
Like amber bead.

His knife see rustic Labour dight,
An cut you up wi ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like onie ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm-reekin, rich!

Then, horn for horn, they stretch an strive:
Deil tak the hindmost, on they drive,
Till a’ their weel-swall’d kytes belyve
Are bent like drums;
The auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
‘Bethankit’ hums.

Is there that owre his French ragout,
Or olio that wad staw a sow,
Or fricassee wad mak her spew
Wi perfect sconner,
Looks down wi sneering, scornfu view
On sic a dinner?

Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
As feckless as a wither’d rash,
His spindle shank a guid whip-lash,
His nieve a nit:
Thro bloody flood or field to dash,
O how unfit!

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread,
Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
He’ll make it whissle;
An legs an arms, an heads will sned,
Like taps o thrissle.

Ye Pow’rs, wha mak mankind your care,
And dish them out their bill o fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
That jaups in luggies:
But, if ye wish her gratefu prayer,
Gie her a Haggis!

I will leave you with this one:-

Address to the Unco Guid.

My Son, these maxims make a rule,
An lump them ay thegither:
The Rigid Righteous is a fool,
The Rigid Wise anither;
The cleanest corn that e’er was dight
May hae some pyles o caff in;
So ne’er a fellow-creature slight
For random fits o daffin.

O ye, wha are sae guid yoursel,
Sae pious and sae holy,
Ye’ve nought to do but mark and tell
Your neebours’ fauts and folly!
Whase life is like a weel-gaun mill,
Supplied wi store o water;
The heapet happer’s ebbing still,
An still the clap plays clatter!

Hear me, ye venerable core,
As counsel for poor mortals
That frequent pass douce Wisdom’s door
For glaikit Folly’s portals:
I for their thoughtless, careless sakes,
Would here propone defences –
Their donsie tricks, their black mistakes,
Their failings and mischances.

Ye see your state wi theirs compared,
And shudder at the niffer;
But cast a moment’s fair regard,
What makes the mighty differ?
Discount what scant occasion gave;
That purity ye pride in;
And (what’s aft mair than a’ the lave)
Your better art o hidin.

Think, when your castigated pulse
Gies now and then a wallop,
What ragings must his veins convulse,
That still eternal gallop!
Wi wind and tide fair i your tail,
Right on ye scud your sea-way;
But in the teeth o baith to sail,
It makes an unco lee-way

See Social Life and Glee sit down,
All joyous and unthinking,
Till, quite transmugrify’d, they’re grown
Debauchery and Drinking:
O, would they stay to calculate
Th’ eternal consequences,
Or your more dreaded hell to state –
Damnation of expenses!

Ye high, exalted, virtuous dames,
Tied up in godly laces,
Before ye gie poor Frailty names,
Suppose a change o cases:
A dear-lov’d lad, convenience snug,
A treach’rous inclination –
But, let me whisper in your lug,
Ye’re aiblins nae temptation.

Then gently scan your brother man,
Still gentler sister woman;
Tho they may gang a kennin wrang,
To step aside is human:
One point must still be greatly dark,
The moving Why they do it;
And just as lamely can ye mark,
How far perhaps they rue it.

Who made the heart, ’tis He alone
Decidedly can try us:
He knows each chord, its various tone,
Each spring, its various bias:
Then at the balance let’s be mute,
We never can adjust it;
What’s done we partly may compute,
But know not what’s resisted.

  • idunnomeself

    will be going to one on Saturday, though might hoke out some Whiskey tonight anyway

    Hae a blyth Burns nicht

  • Alan2

    Burns Night

    Tullintrain Pipe Band
    The Masonic Hall Bishops Street Londonderry
    Tickets £7.50
    Contact Alistair Miller 028 7131 1218
    Featuring
    Tullintrain Ceildh Pipe Band with Herbie on the Organ
    Scottish Country Dancers
    Address to a Haggis
    Supper (Tatties ,Neeps and Haggis)
    Dance Band

  • Alan2

    Burns night special at Queen’s University

    Burns Night, Tuesday 25 January, is to be celebrated in style at Queen’s University, when the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry’s Burns Night gets underway at 7.30pm in the University’s Great Hall.

    Robert Burns, poet and songwriter, Scotland’s favourite son and champion of the common people, was born on January 25, 1759 in the village of Alloway near Ayr. Each year the Scottish national icon’s birthday is celebrated by Scots around the world at Burns Suppers and readings of his poetry.

    Tuesday evening’s celebration at Queen’s will include a talk on the poet’s song lyrics in the context of their performance by the current leading Burns authority and editor of the Canongate Burns book, Dr Andrew Noble. Later, Len Graham from Mullaghbawn, one of Ireland’s well-know traditional singers will perform a number of Burns songs with Glasgow’s inimitable Adam McNaughton, one of the most original of Scotland’s contemporary folksingers. The evening’s entertainment will be rounded off with lively renditions of Irish and Scottish music on accordion and fiddle from James McElheran and Dominic McNab from the Glens of Antrim.

    “I’m delighted to start the new Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry programme of events for the semester with this exciting Burns Night,” said the Centre’s Director Professor Ciaran Carson. “We’ve brought together an impressive line-up of musicians who will be introduced by Dr John Kirk, Senior Lecturer in English and Scottish Language in the School of English, and a keen Ulster-Scots supporter.”

    Dr Kirk adds that “this new annual event aims to bring to the province the finest in current Burns criticism and editorial scholarship. There will be no supper, none of the cult speeches, and no tartanry. The emphasis will be on celebrating the poems and songs through renditions, and on the fullest interpretation of Burns’s poetic intentions in his contemporary political context.”

    Ye see yon birkie, ca’d a lord,
    Wha struts, and stares, and a’ that;
    Tho hundreds worship at his word,
    He’s but a coof for a’ that:
    For a’ that, and a’ that,
    His ribband, star, an’ a’ that:
    The man o’ independent mind
    He looks an’ laughs at a’ that.
    Extract from A Man’s a Man For A’ That, Burns’ famous song of liberty and independence.

    For further media information, contact: Dolores Vischer, QUB Communications Office, 028 9097 5320.

    Notes:
    1. The Burns Night Special will take place at 7.30pm on Tuesday 25 January in the Great Hall at Queen’s. No tickets or advance reservation is required.
    2. The next Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry event will take place on Thursday 10th February at 7pm in the Visitor’s Centre to mark the launch of a new book edited by Selina Guinness, The New Irish Poets.

  • Alan2

    . Grace Neill’s Restaurant in Donaghadee are celebrating Burns night with dinner and entertainment next Tuesday, January 25. It promises to be a light-hearted evening of pipes, poetry and haggis from the staff of the oldest pub in Ireland. The piper for the evening will be Stuart Cassells from Falkirk. A Wheen O Folk will also be appearing at 10pm.

    . The Ulster Scots Folk Orchestra will be appearing at the Royal Hotel Cookstown on Friday at a Rabbie Burns Supper at 7.30pm. Contact 028796 31388. Willie Drennan and a Wheen O Folk will be at La Mon Hotel on Saturday 22. Contact 02890 794131. A Wheen O Folk will also be playing at Donaghadee Library on January 25.

    . The Ulster Scots Folk Orchestra in conjunction with the Mid Ulster Scots Society are celebrating the release of their latest CD – My Aunt Jane in the Dunadry Inn Antrim on January 26. The evening will include a 4 course meal and a concert with the Ulster Scots Folk Orchestra. The evening starts at 7.30pm Tickets cost £30.00 and can be obtained by contacting Muriel on 028 7035 1513 or Dunadry Inn.

  • Alan2

    . Grace Neill’s Restaurant in Donaghadee are celebrating Burns night with dinner and entertainment next Tuesday, January 25. It promises to be a light-hearted evening of pipes, poetry and haggis from the staff of the oldest pub in Ireland. The piper for the evening will be Stuart Cassells from Falkirk. A Wheen O Folk will also be appearing at 10pm.

    . The Ulster Scots Folk Orchestra will be appearing at the Royal Hotel Cookstown on Friday at a Rabbie Burns Supper at 7.30pm. Contact 028796 31388. Willie Drennan and a Wheen O Folk will be at La Mon Hotel on Saturday 22. Contact 02890 794131. A Wheen O Folk will also be playing at Donaghadee Library on January 25.

    . The Ulster Scots Folk Orchestra in conjunction with the Mid Ulster Scots Society are celebrating the release of their latest CD – My Aunt Jane in the Dunadry Inn Antrim on January 26. The evening will include a 4 course meal and a concert with the Ulster Scots Folk Orchestra. The evening starts at 7.30pm Tickets cost £30.00 and can be obtained by contacting Muriel on 028 7035 1513 or Dunadry Inn.