Ogra Shinn Fein dropped contentious logo

In it’s rebrand from Sinn Fein Youth to Ogra Shinn Fein the to remove the petrol bomb motif from its logo. Sharon O’Neill catches up in the Irish News:

“A spokesman for Ogra Shinn Fein insisted it had changed around a year ago to coincide with a name switch from Sinn Fein Youth, although the new image has yet to reach some murals.

“A wall on the Andersonstown Road in west Belfast displays a large circle with the new name, Ogra Shinn Fein, circling the previous contentious logo of a flame-engulfed Easter Lily inside a petrol bomb.

“Over the years Sinn Fein had resisted calls for the removal of the symbol, with SDLP councillor Alex Attwood claiming in 1998 it sent out a conflicting message during a time of peace.

“However, the then Sinn Fein’s Youth spokesman Eoin O Broin said the logo was merely ‘tongue in cheek’.

“‘The idea is that traditionally things like petrol bombs have been part of the way young people have resisted the state’s violence. It’s just a metaphoric thing if you like,’ he said at the time”.

  • El Matador

    Can I quote on that Mr Gaskin? I’d love to see a Sinn Feiner admit they were wrong for a change

  • JD

    Mark Robinson for example

  • El Matador

    JD

    And if there is a nationalist MP, it’ll be SDLP

  • JD

    Well going by the 2001 election i think that goes without saying

  • cg

    “Well going by the 2001 election i think that goes without saying2

    Sory to trouble you boy’s but things have changed since 2001

  • cg

    “Sory” should read sorry

    sorry;)

  • Ringo

    cg/El Matador

    all- Ireland party the majority of nationalists supported you

    does anyone have any idea how many nationalists there are in the Republic- are you assuming that there are 4 million?

    Nobody has really bothered to ask exactly that – the only thing that we were asked was to ratify the GFA – (which was done in style). That essentially meant that we were stepping back from nationalism, best expressed through articles 2&3, to a position of neutrality on the constitutional status of the north and offical acceptance of partition.

    So how would you define a southern nationalist?

  • Unhappy with Partition and wants a UI?
  • Happy with partition but would prefer a UI?
  • Happy with partition but would consider a UI?
  • Happy with partition as long as nationalists in the north have the same cultural and social opportunities as unionists?
  • One way or the the other the southern electorate is not a mirror image of the northern nationalist electorate – the environments are completely different.

  • JD

    Lol, no need to correct your spelling its the rest of the sentence.

    Lets just wait and see shall we

  • cg

    JD
    LOL, ok

  • PS

    Glad to see the SDLP enjoying their success in South Belfast. It is, after all, one of only two constitutencies in the north where they elect more MLAs than Sinn Féin.

  • El Matador

    This is unbelievable- yet more unfounded Sinn Fein lies! Except this time it can be countered by hard evidence. The SDLP have more MLAs than SF in FOUR constituencies: South Antrim, South Belfast, Foyle and Lagan Valley, and in many they have the same number as SF (eg Upper Bann, East Derry)

    This sums up SF spin- random lies regurgitated in the guise of truths in the hope no one will notice.

    Hilarious!

  • unionist_observer

    “One way or the the other the southern electorate is not a mirror image of the northern nationalist electorate – the environments are completely different.”

    Absolutely, a common misconception among northerners, both unionists and nationalists think that everyone in the republic must definitely want a United Ireland. Citizens of the republic grew up in a completely different society than citizens of Northern Ireland did. Ironically northern nationalists probably have more in common with northern unionists than southern nationalists.

    Also from my experience most people in the republic really don’t care that much about the whole United Ireland question. This was evidenced by the huge endorsement of the Good Friday Agreement, that meant voting for the union but southern nationalists voted for it. People in the republic just seem to want to see Northern Ireland settled and peaceful whether than be though a United Ireland or the Union.

  • cg

    Rebecca
    For someone living in the 26 counties your knowledge and understanding of the people is dismal at best.

  • Ringo

    For someone living in the 26 counties your knowledge and understanding of the people is dismal at best.

    From what I understand unionist_observer’s exposure to society here is mainly through her studies – probably mixing with well educated, mainly urban people. (Correct me if I’m wrong UO)
    I think her comments accurately reflect the general outlook of a substantial section of the society.

    You’re a northerner too aren’t you, cg? Ever lived down here for very long yourself?

  • cg

    “You’re a northerner too aren’t you, cg”

    Yes living about a mile from the border.

    “Ever lived down here for very long yourself?”

    Yes plus half my family live down south and I work in the 26 counties. Plus my “exposure” to that society is not limited to its middle-classes.

  • slackjaw

    unionist_observer’s comments, from what I can see after living here for 5 years or so, are accurate enough.

    Most Irish people I associate with here are unconcerned about the situation in the North one way or the other, often to my exasperation. The main talking point on the North, at least in Leinster, is the bargains you can get shopping in Newry. That is the reality that begins somewhere on the M1 between Dundalk and Drogheda.

  • Ringo

    cg –
    Yes plus half my family live down south and I work in the 26 counties. Plus my “exposure” to that society is not limited to its middle-classes.

    So you acknowledge that she might be accurately representing the attitudes of a significant section of the population down here – what you called the middle classes?

    Or do you think that your exposure to society in the Republic has enabled you to do a Dev-in-exile on it and intutitively know what the all the plain people of Ireland want?

    I don’t dispute the fact that there is a significant section of society in the Republic with similar views to you, and neither are you in a position to dispute that there is a significant section who’s opinions are accurately reflected in unionist_observer post. But you did.

  • cg

    “neither are you in a position to dispute that there is a significant section who’s opinions are accurately reflected in unionist_observer post. But you did.”

    and why is that?

  • Ringo

    cg –

    and why is that?
    sorry, I don’t understand the question.

  • unionist_observer

    “From what I understand unionist_observer’s exposure to society here is mainly through her studies – probably mixing with well educated, mainly urban people. (Correct me if I’m wrong UO)”

    Yes, thats about accurate, its also the view of the media in the republic. The point I was making is that generally people in the republic really aren’t too bothered about the situation in Northern Ireland. They are certainly not all in crouching position on the border waiting to dash in and push all prods into the sea which is sometimes what the DUP would have you believe.

    North Louth is different however, anyone I know from Dundalk or around that area usually have very strong views about NI, I put that down to their proximity to the border.