Irish to become an official EU language…

Irish is to be the EU’s 21st official language, according to the Examiner. It will mean “jobs for 110 translators fluent in the language, who can earn up to €85,000”. Aha, an end to Slugger’s funding problems! Anois, ca bhfuil mo focloir?

  • beano

    Good work POM, you’ve us all convinced now that the Irish language isn’t simply being abused for political reasons.

  • James Orr

    POM,
    You’re a clown. Ulster-Scots gets £1.7m for all language and cultural activity. Only about £300K per year gets spent on language. Wise up.

  • James Orr

    POM,
    Just in case you’re a total clampet – the U-S Agency currently gets £1.7m per year. About £400K of that goes on running costs (accommodation, staff salaries, office expenses, depreciation). That leaves £1.3m, £300K of which is invested in linguistic projects like Stranmillis College and the University of Ulster at Magee. That leaves £1m to promote the entire cultural grassroots, most of which is spent on grant applications by the 300+ grassroots Ulster-Scots groups to run cultural events, musical tuition classes, dance tuition classes and publications programmes.

    All of this info is in the public domain (see http://www.ulsterscotsagency.com) and if you were interested in doing any research at all you would already know these things.

    Perhaps you would be so kind as to total all of the govt £ spent on Irish culture and language each year? I would guess the inequality is already running at around 20:1

  • jmc

    > We need to forbid all enlgish and if people dont
    > wanna speak irish they can leave and go to england.

    Mr Morgan

    Well that will certainly reduce property prices in Ireland, as it seems 98% of the population currently speak English as their daily language.

    Morgan. .. that’s a Norman/Welsh family name, is n’t it?

    To those of us whose families have lived in this god-forsaken island for thousands of years find it a bit rich that blow-ins like yourself try to tell us what language we should or should not speak. That we should be speaking the language of one culture who migrated to Ireland , the Celts, rather than the language of another culture that migrated to Ireland, the Scandinavian / Norman / English, I find to be the hight of cultural arrogance and true cultural imperialism. My ancestors became English speaking 300+ years ago the same way they became Gaelic speaking 1500+ years before, by diffusion and submersion.

    There were people living in Ireland 7000 years before the first Gaelic speaking Celt ever set foot on this island, and the there will be people living here quite happily long after the last native speaking Gaelic speaker dies, sometime in the next generation or two.

    Languages come, languages go. Get over it.

    You know, this was a pretty peaceful island before all those bloody Celts moved in…

  • 6countyprod

    Nice one, jmc

  • Pádraig Ó Muireagáin

    well jmc there are definitely a lot of morgans in wales but there are also a lot here. the irish morgans originated from leinster especially louth and leinster so dont try and crack that my ancestors emigrated from wales.

  • maca

    jmc, McConnell, A “gaelic” name no doubt, and your calling Morgan a “blow in”. ROTFL!

  • jm

    maca

    Ah thats the joy of Irish surnames.

    Mostly you can tell their origin, but sometimes you can be tripped up. When in comes to O’s and Mac’s and Mc’s you have to be careful because their use, especially in the 19’th century, was very fluid. So I am sorry to disappoint you , but my parental surname stabilized with its current prefix about 100 years ago. Before then the prefix had been sometimes O, Mc or Mac, but usually dropped altogether.

    The Irish came late to surnames and were rather haphazard in their use and spelling, much to the delight of future genealogists…

  • jmc

    Mr Morgan

    There are lots of Morgans in Wales because that is where the family originated. Have a quick look in any book on the genealogy of Irish family surnames. The family most probably settled in Ireland during the 13’th or 14’th century so that technically makes it Old English.

    No shame in that. Just another group in the long line of cultures and peoples that have emigrated to Ireland over the last nine thousand years. The paleolithic hunter / gathers, the neolithic coastal farmers, the bronze age upland farmers, the iron age Celts, the Scandinavians, the Anglo-Normans, the Norman-Welsh, the upland Scots, the Old English, the New English, the lowland Scots, and now the Poles, Chinese, Balts, and dozens more nationalities.

  • G2

    “I’m just waiting for the day when they make Scots an official language.”

    last year Scots enthusiasts erected road signs in the Newtownards Strangford area written in Ulster Scots. The DUP sent out angry members to take them down again because they believed the signposts were written in Irish Gaelic and had been the work of republican shitstirrers.

  • Pádraig Ó Muireagáin

    i me be half morgan but im also half Murphy, the most common and famous irish name. I suppose they came from Wales too or settled here in the 12th century.

  • maca

    JMC
    I’m afraid you’re post makes little sense as usual. The origin is pretty clear, no matter what you claim was the prefix a couple of hundred years ago. And as I said it makes you as much a blow in a “morgan” (according to your 10:37 of yesterday).

    Also
    “The Irish came late to surnames” Perhaps, when compared to the Chinese(3k yrs old) or Japanese(5th C). But if we limit ourselves to just Europe then your statement is false.

  • maca

    “you’re” should have been “your” – typo

  • jmc

    maca

    It seems you know as little about Irish family names and genealogy as you do about comparative linguistics….

    And I would hazard a guess by your tone that you might have one of the blow-in surnames too..

    Anyway, my lot, based on the surnames that appear in my family tree for the last six or seven generations, and the very strong degree of geographical localization of Irish surnames, have been settled in the drumlin country of south ulster / north midlands for a very very long time.

    Read the book The Tribes of Britain if you want a introduction to the migration and settlement patterns in these islands over the last 10,000 years. Upland areas, after initial settlement, tend to have remarkable stable population groups over very long periods of time.

  • James

    Irish? EU? Official language? I’ve never heard of such a hideous, monetary piss up the wall.

    Intoducing Irish as an official EU language, is a slap in the face to minority language speakers all over Europe. Do those barmy Europrats not waste enough cash?

    And I say this as a Welshman, from a country where there are a significant number of people who speak Welsh as a first language. But I wouldn’t advocate spending millions to translate wads of bureaucratic Brussels gumf into Welsh for people who, if they wanted to, could read the sleep-inducing tosh in English. And, since there are just a handful of Irishmen who genuinely speak Gaelic as a mother tongue, I feel it’s another disgusting abuse of Ireland’s chief EU scrounger status.

    I have no quarrel with the Irish wanting to ensure Gaelic remains part of their national heretage, but the EU, as a supernational institution, is the wrong forum for this political ballgame. Practicality has to come before politics sometimes, y’know? And this is especially true when the cash-hungry EU translation racket already gobbles up $1billion every year. It can only breed further resentment from an increasing number of people who feel the EU is taking the piss.

  • maca

    James
    “But I wouldn’t advocate spending millions to translate wads of bureaucratic Brussels gumf into Welsh for people who, if they wanted to, could read the sleep-inducing tosh in English”

    But you already spend millions translating documents into Welsh for people who can also speak English! Didn’t you know that!?!

  • maca

    JMcConnell
    Apologies for the delayed response, I didn’t check this thread before today.

    “And I would hazard a guess by your tone that you might have one of the blow-in surnames too..”

    It’s as much a blow-in as yours J.

    “Anyway, my lot, have been settled in the drumlin country of south ulster / north midlands for a very very long time.”

    But still blow ins according to your own previous posts.

  • abucs

    I think it’s good that English is spoken widely in Ireland, leaving aside the realities of how it happenned.

    If it was to magically dissapear from Ireland tomorrow we’d be planning how to introduce English in the schools, so as to be attractive to foreign investment.

    But Irish should also be taught and respected.
    Many countries thrive that are bi-lingual. But that will only happen when enough people want it to happen.

  • jmc

    maca

    As I said previously the first people arrived in Ireland 9K years ago. Most of my lot probably arrived in the south ulster uplands starting 4K+ years ago. Your lot, based on your paternal surname, have probably being bouncing backward and forwards between the south Ulster lowlands and Scotland for the last several thousand years, and the original poster who I replied to had a paternal surname that arrived here in the last thousand years from Wales.

    I was just pointing out the irony of the fact that the poster of the “speak Irish or get out” opinion had a paternal surname that was a fairly recent (non-Irish speaking) arrival. The fact that his maternal surname has been kicking around this island as long as ours does not really detract from the silliness of his original post.

  • Pádraig Ó Muireagáin

    i don’t care what anybody has to say about Irish, especially if they are not priviledged enough to be Irish. I know that i am Gaelach and im fuckin proud of it. British Heritage isn’t exactly a strong thing. Its made up of three different countries which each spreak their own language and their queen is a german who is married to a racist greek. The language is a bastard language, cutting and pasting from all other languages, including words from IRISH eg slogan,craic,glen
    Tiocfaidh ár lá

  • Pádraig Ó Muireagáin

    i direct ppl to they grey box at the side of this website http://www.unhchr.ch/udhr/lang/gli1.htm

  • Dread Cthulhu

    CC: “This is a backward step. If the Euro was a good idea, how come a common European language isn’t? English should become the common European language and scrap translations into anything else. Who reads the translations? Anyone here? It’s inevitable that English will become the European language. We should stop wasting money fighting it. All entries for the European Song Farce already use English, bar France. “

    And there you have answered your question all by your lonesome, Congal, at least in part. Unless you are willing to make French the universal EU language, its not going to fly. The French go so far as to employ “language police” to try to drive out invading Anglo-Saxonisms, like “e-mail,” which they have “suggested” the replacement of “courielle,” short for “courier-electonique.”

    There is too much history to overcome to make the sweeping change to posit. Eastern Europe would not jump on getting their documents in German, the French demand French, et al and ad nauseum.

  • jmc

    Mr Morgan

    You are sounding more and more like a third generation Irish-American who has had too much to drink in some Irish bar in Boston on St Patricks Day..

  • ballymichael

    maca / jmc

    “The Irish came late to surnames” Perhaps, when compared to the Chinese(3k yrs old) or Japanese(5th C). But if we limit ourselves to just Europe then your statement is false.”

    Turkish surnames were only instituted in the 1920’s. Many were made up on the spot by Mustafa Kemal for his followers. He made up “Atatürk” (Father of the turks) for himself.

    well, I found it interesting …

  • maca

    BM
    “Turkish surnames were only instituted in the 1920’s. Many were made up on the spot…
    well, I found it interesting …”

    The Finns did something similar in the 19th C, they had a “national awakening” and under a process called “Fennicization” many names were created or translated into Finnish. AFAIK.

    The Chinese select western first names all the time, for use in business. It’s very annoying. It’s hard to keep a straight face when dealing with someone called Iceman or Hunter.

  • Dread Cthulhu

    maca: “The Chinese select western first names all the time, for use in business. It’s very annoying. It’s hard to keep a straight face when dealing with someone called Iceman or Hunter.”

    Try the other extreme on for size — working in a oceanology lab / workshop where all the grad students are “Wang.” Wang Wei, Wang Chin and Wang Tse Min… a real barrel of laughs, it was like an Abbot and Costello routine, trying to get anything done.