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Profile for Ní Dhuibhir

Siún Carden - anthropologist without portfolio ; )

Latest posts from Ní Dhuibhir (see all)

Ní Dhuibhir has posted 2 times (0 in the last month).

Owen Paterson on welfare reform at Queen’s

Wed 29 February 2012, 10:07am

Tweet Owen Paterson used his visit to QUB last night to articulate the government’s position on the Welfare Reform Bill, with much talk of ‘rebalancing the economy’ and injecting ‘dynamism’ by tackling our ‘broken’ welfare system. In a week when the Work Programme and A4E scandals in GB have raised public anger about the exploitation […] more »

Service not available in Northern Ireland

Fri 21 May 2010, 5:15pm

Tweet Channel  4’s decision not to broadcast the Marie Stopes ‘Are you late?’ TV advert in Northern Ireland raises questions about what information it is criminal to distribute here.  The Chief Executive of Marie Stopes International told the Guardian that ‘the advertising of abortion facilities, their contact numbers or addresses is against the law in […] more »

Latest comments from Ní Dhuibhir (see all)

Ní Dhuibhir has commented 86 times (0 in the last month).

  1. Comment on Cara Park: “Continue the fight for equality in the face of casual misogyny, physical misogyny and, most importantly, resist and revolt against misogyny by the state.” #AMU (video added)
    on 11 March 2014 at 9:56 am

    I was at the event and it bore no relation whatsoever to the account in the Belfast Telegraph. It was the most powerful interaction I’ve ever had with party politics in NI (and I’m 31). The women who spoke were fantastically diverse, and each was instructed to speak about what was important to them. There was a massive range of performance styles – and these were performances, not articles, which explains why Cara’s words might read oddly – but the themes of political participation, bodily autonomy and the linkages between the two emerged strongly through it all. The format was designed to be the start of a conversation, with audience and speakers making new connections and sharing ideas for action, and for once this actually happened. For the very first time in my life, I’m considering joining a political party. Seeing the Bel Tel coverage was stomach-turning.

    I spent Saturday watching Anna Lo and people on the International Woman’s Day march stand up to flag protestors yelling at them to ‘go home’, with press photographers snapping away, and Monday seeing that the only coverage of the whole weekend’s events was a fake moral panic about a nipple that was, in the flesh, invisible to the naked eye.

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  2. Comment on Cara Park: “Continue the fight for equality in the face of casual misogyny, physical misogyny and, most importantly, resist and revolt against misogyny by the state.” #AMU (video added)
    on 11 March 2014 at 9:55 am

    I was at the event and it bore no relation whatsoever to the account in the Belfast Telegraph. It was the most powerful interaction I’ve ever had with party politics in NI (and I’m 31). The women who spoke were fantastically diverse, and each was instructed to speak about what was important to them. There was a massive range of performance styles – and these were performances, not articles, which explains why Cara’s words might read oddly – but the themes of political participation, bodily autonomy and the linkages between the two emerged strongly through it all. The format was designed to be the start of a conversation, with audience and speakers making new connections and sharing ideas for action, and for once this actually happened. For the very first time in my life, I’m considering joining a political party. Seeing the Bel Tel coverage was stomach-turning.

    I spent Saturday watching fla Anna Lo and people on the International Woman’s Day march stand up to flag protestors yelling at them to ‘go home’, with press photographers snapping away, and Monday seeing that the only coverage of the whole weekend’s events was a fake moral panic about a nipple that was, in the flesh, invisible to the naked eye.

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  3. Comment on Surviving the job hunt-It’s a jungle out there!
    on 17 December 2013 at 12:01 pm

    Absolutely Stewart, the impact of job instability and very short term contracts is huge. When so many people supposedly ‘in work’ are actively looking for work, there’s not much hope for those who haven’t even got that foot in the door. Most of the people I know who have succeeded in getting traditional ‘graduate’ jobs over the last few years are massively overqualified for them. I feel incredibly lucky to have a job at all. The gap in perception between people who have experienced the labour market in recent years and those who haven’t is ridiculous – during the several years I was struggling to find any job lasting more than a few weeks, well-meaning people kept asking things like ‘would you ever think of looking across the water?’ – as if I wasn’t!! When Welfare Reform comes in here, things are going to be seriously grim.

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  4. Comment on Northern Ireland Culture Wars (part 2) – Social Change and the Culture Wars panel with Fiona Bloomer & John O’Doherty
    on 10 December 2013 at 1:41 pm

    These ‘culture wars’ seem to consist of deafening silence and active attempts at silencing others from our politicians, while the affluent and educated live like it’s 2013 regardless, and everyone else here suffers the consequences of a political system entirely devoted to rehashing the war that formed it.

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  5. Comment on After Liam Adams: “the very warped sense of loyalty that people had to different causes”
    on 5 December 2013 at 11:19 am

    Good stuff from Naomi. Too often, we still talk as if ‘political’ violence is the only kind people here have been victims of. Building a society where domestic and sexual violence are punishable crimes is a mammoth task we’re only just beginning, and it’s doubtful whether political structures rooted in military and pseudo-military culture are up to the job.

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  6. Comment on Alternative Ulsters: Conversations on Identity (Mark Carruthers)
    on 5 November 2013 at 12:02 pm

    Scáth Shéamais – while I agree with your first bit, I don’t think other forms of identity are currently being expressed through national identity as much as they are being obscured and even suppressed by it. Old Stormont wasn’t exactly hot on other kinds of diversity either, and while the national question is structurally embedded in today’s Stormont in a different way, forms of identification other than orange and green still barely get a look-in. I fear that letting that go unremarked perpetuates a lot of our problems.

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  7. Comment on Alternative Ulsters: Conversations on Identity (Mark Carruthers)
    on 4 November 2013 at 2:29 pm

    It’s strange how completely ‘nationality’ has occupied the much greater space of ‘identity’ here, and how unacknowledged this goes.

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  8. Comment on Updated: European Parliament rejects abortion as a `human right` – Sinn Fein & Labour support motion
    on 23 October 2013 at 10:50 am

    If a foetus blocks off your car, Dave, you’ve got bigger things to worry about than getting out of your parking space!

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  9. Comment on New media and new politics in NI? Or complacency after conflict?
    on 21 October 2013 at 10:18 am

    Politics =/= party officials, and politics =/= one single constitutional question, especially if you’re talking about the political potential of new media. It’s strange not to mention abortion rights campaigning which, with the help of Twitter, Facebook and bloody Nolan, appears to have changed the public conversation at least. That’s every bit as ‘political’ as Willie Frazer, and that’s where the missing politically active women are.

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