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Profile for Mick Fealty

Mick is the founding editor of Slugger. He has also written on politics for the Daily Telegraph, and is a regular contributor for the Guardian's trend setting Comment is Free site. He has written several papers on the impacts of the Internet on politics and the wider media and is a regular guest and speaking events across Ireland, the UK and Europe. He also works as a digital path finder for larger media organisations like the Daily Telegraph, RTE and Ulster Television and delivers strategy and coaching services to high level executives. See sluggerconsults.com for more detail...

Latest posts from Mick Fealty (see all)

Mick Fealty has posted 9,387 times (52 in the last month).

What makes for a successful and thriving democracy?

Thu 24 April 2014, 8:06am

Tweet I picked up this gif on Google Plus a few days ago. If you look at the detail you’ll see there’s plenty to argue about, but it seems to me that’s what makes it worth sharing. What do we consider needs to be present to consider a country to be democratic? The first and […] more »

#IndyRef: “Nationalism breaks things and they are things not easy to fix.”

Wed 23 April 2014, 2:03pm

Tweet On the subject of Scotland and the clear failings of the No campaign (such as it is) Hugo Riftkind’s column in yesterday’s London Times is worth looking at (if you have a subscription). He deals with the impossibility clause currently being pushed by Labour, up front… …as we all know really, an independent Scotland, […] more »

“Lesson One. Never, ever, agree to take over from a legend. Someone is bound to end up disappointed.”

Wed 23 April 2014, 10:58am

Tweet So Manchester United let go their decent man manager David Moyes after just ten months in the job. And with him goes the myth that somehow United where above the petty desperation that has infected other Premiership clubs (he’s the tenth to lose his job this season). Like the idea that the club was […] more »

Polls: Ireland’s two party system dead as four blocks slip into their electoral trenches

Sun 20 April 2014, 7:58am

Tweet So, two Irish polls this weekend. Not sure what to make of either of them to be honest, since there’s a divergence between them in FG’s rating of some 9%. The B&A poll in the Sunday Times has Fine Gael dropping like stone from 30% to 21%, whilst Sindo/Millward Brown has them on 29% […] more »

Belfast Telegraph’s Are you voting for the wrong party poll, and other political anomalies?

Fri 18 April 2014, 1:20pm

Tweet Right, I am literally just rushing out the door… Can I ask that people take a bit of time out to to complete the Belfast Telegraph’s Local Election party preference poll and then share your experiences (though not necessarily your choices) with us here below. I’ll come back over the weekend and share some […] more »

Geraldine Finucane: “A deep wound cannot be stitched over and just left because it won’t heal”

Fri 18 April 2014, 12:19pm

Tweet In the week the Victims Commissioner quietly and discreetly left her post, the BBC’s Stephen Sackur conducted an unusually moving and telling interview with Geraldine Finucane, widow of Pat Finucane. I recommend watching the whole thing, but I think the end was the most powerful and universal: There is an analogy that I use […] more »

A tale of two wars (well two divergent accounts of the same war)…

Thu 17 April 2014, 12:30pm

Tweet Two conflicting responses to the Secretary of State’s speech, first from Gerry Kelly… “Her comments on the past are deeply offensive to the hundreds of victims of state killings and loyalist collusion. Many of these killings were ordered from the very top of the British establishment during the Thatcher era. “Around 15,000 republicans were […] more »

Trouble at NI21 mill…

Wed 16 April 2014, 9:25am

Tweet Having a good idea (NI21) is not the same as putting it into action… Trouble in Holywood and Clandeboye… Gerry Leddy, who had been involved with the party since its inception almost a year ago, said that he could not tell people to vote for its European candidate, Tina McKenzie, as he had “no […] more »

Villiers: What Stormont needs is the revitalising influence of an opposition…

Wed 16 April 2014, 7:30am

Tweet Another day in Northern Ireland, another Groundhog.. Theresa Villiers is make a speech today saying it is time to make progress on the past and on a future that could bring NI political life back to the cryogenically sealed democracy unit currently operating at Stormont.. “Political institutions the world over adapt and change. As […] more »

“it struck me that there was an air of inevitability about the whole thing…”

Tue 15 April 2014, 2:44pm

Tweet Alex Kane with some much needed perspective on the events at Elizabeth Windsor’s gaffe in, erm Windsor… …what we are now seeing in the changing nature of the relationship between the British/Irish governments and their collective political establishments is also inevitable. This is the story of two countries going out of their way to […] more »

Latest comments from Mick Fealty (see all)

Mick Fealty has commented 12,713 times (191 in the last month).

  1. Comment on What makes for a successful and thriving democracy?
    on 24 April 2014 at 9:37 am

    Barney, those anomalies are worth picking out, and highlighting. Reasons?

    Go to comment

  2. Comment on Gerry Adams: “I have no recollection of that whatsoever.”
    on 24 April 2014 at 7:35 am

    P68,

    It matters in the sense that the acceptance of his lying a legitimate part of the PP makes us partial participants in the SF cause. Not playing along means you open yourself to dogs abuse.

    The problem is it is not a standard applicable to any other politician north or south. Gerry himself will rail in the Dail (rightly) about the unaccountable Garda Siochana whilst denying others the right to call him on his past actions.

    By the orthodoxies of the Peace Process that’s just denying realty. Yet it is a problem.

    Go to comment

  3. Comment on #IndyRef: “Nationalism breaks things and they are things not easy to fix.”
    on 24 April 2014 at 6:24 am

    That is a theme Id like to see explicitly addressed in the overall essay series I think. In the meantime I think this is how Rifkind deals with it:

    “Paradoxical as it might sound, one only need hear the chorus of approval that the notion of Scottish independence gets from some English people – and not exclusively in the North East – to know what a fantasy it is. “No wonder you want to go!” they say, eying the ruddy-faced public schoolboys of Downing Street with a shudder. “If only we could do the same!” As the presence of so many like-minded compatriots south of the border wasn’t, in fact, the best argument against Scottish independence there was.”

    Go to comment

  4. Comment on Gerry Adams: “I have no recollection of that whatsoever.”
    on 24 April 2014 at 12:59 am

    P68/Turgon,

    I don’t know if Rogers is not telling the truth, but I’m pretty sure Gerry isn’t. He’s made as much clear by talking about ‘his position’ and making it clear that others may choose to believe otherwise.

    If Rogers right it means Martin lied to Saville (when granted immunity). I also think it’s interesting that more and more former volunteers feel less and less bound by the rules of the famous Green Book, which are pretty clear that denial is a volunteer’s duty.

    With no IRA still in existence, perhaps people feel that obligation is loosening?

    Go to comment

  5. Comment on #IndyRef: “Nationalism breaks things and they are things not easy to fix.”
    on 23 April 2014 at 6:02 pm

    Darcus Howe in the write up to his four part documentary for Channel 4, White Tribe in 2000 (http://goo.gl/roGnGe):

    “I’d come here to discover the English, but they were not English at all, they were Geordies. Their loyalty was to their team and to their city. England for them was another country.”

    Even in Stow-on-the Wold, a traditional English village, the heart of middle England and, says Darcus, “the England I dreamt about in Trinidad”, he is shocked at the lack of Englishness on show.

    “The first pub I saw was called a Brasserie and you couldn’t get a ploughman’s lunch!” The culture of the day was French, not English. “We are losing our identity”, admits one such Francophile, “it’s becoming a nebulous, jelly-like thing: what is Englishness? I don’t know any more.”

    Go to comment

  6. Comment on #IndyRef: “Nationalism breaks things and they are things not easy to fix.”
    on 23 April 2014 at 4:49 pm

    Dec, what about lives saved during The Troubles© and the Peace Process™ era by juggling kids between one paramilitary controlled area to another or, indeed, further afield to places like Birmingham?

    PS, I think you make a decent point about a difference between xenophobia and nationalism. But I think his point about us and them is worth considering more carefully.

    Go to comment

  7. Comment on #IndyRef: “Nationalism breaks things and they are things not easy to fix.”
    on 23 April 2014 at 4:07 pm

    Right, it is not up to me to offer a counterpoint to some of these criticisms, but I will try to fill in some of the gaps imposed on Rifkind’s column by the paywall. I think this passage is relevant to some of comments made so far:

    Of course nobody likes being called a nationalist. They get cross, these pro indy Scots, when the label is applied. Independence, they claim is not nationalism because it is based on no sort of ethnic identity. Their is case rather that Scotland is in fact a liberal, caring, social democracy in waiting, but nasty, right wing England is holding it back.

    It is balls. On every level it is balls. For one thing, a nice progressive nationalism is still nationalism. It is still about taking one group and hiving it off from everybody else. And for another, the right wing, England of SNP folklore is utter fantasy. The last election was the first time since 1992 that an English majority had not voted Labour.

    Paradoxical as it might sound, one only need hear the chorus of approval that the notion of Scottish independence gets from some English people – and not exclusively in the North East – to know what a fantasy it is. “No wonder you want to go!” they say, eying the ruddy-faced public schoolboys of Downing Street with a shudder. “If only we could do the same!” As the presence of so many like-minded compatriots south of the border wasn’t, in fact, the best argument against Scottish independence there was.

    All are reacting to a state of affairs in Westminster so temporary that it might very well not be there by the time independence would happen anyway. With a Prime Minister Miliband in power, a shift to President Salmond would be a considerable move to the right. “But it’ll shake things up!” the dim left are starting to say, as though the schism of centuries of union was akin to a bracing shower. And it indeed it will, but perhaps not in a way they’ll much enjoy.

    PS, someone on Twitter pointed me at this clip from US comedian Doug Stanhope on Nationalism:

    Go to comment

  8. Comment on “Lesson One. Never, ever, agree to take over from a legend. Someone is bound to end up disappointed.”
    on 23 April 2014 at 2:04 pm

    Not getting him in at the start didn’t help. I don’t think they are going to make that mistake again.

    Go to comment

  9. Comment on “Lesson One. Never, ever, agree to take over from a legend. Someone is bound to end up disappointed.”
    on 23 April 2014 at 1:28 pm

    Niall,

    “Lesson Three. If your success depends on the quality of your team, and the quality of your team depends on how much the shareholders will pay to maintain it, don’t take a job where the owners are bent only on squeezing costs and assets. (Chief executives of investment banks, please note.)

    Lesson Four. It’s going to take time to convince the team that you’re the right person to take charge. At least make sure that you gain enough of their confidence to achieve one of your key performance indicators – whether that’s a place in the Champions’ League or a quarterly sales target.”

    Go to comment

  10. Comment on “Lesson One. Never, ever, agree to take over from a legend. Someone is bound to end up disappointed.”
    on 23 April 2014 at 12:23 pm

    DC,

    This is what I actually said (when trying to explain how Fergie keep his job as unfeasibly long as he did) (http://goo.gl/5U2HK)…

    “What’s actually shocking about the English Premiership is just how far the two Manchester clubs are ahead of everyone else. As Brennan points out the damage was done with the establishment of the Premiership. The gap between the top and even the residents of mid table mediocrity is impossible to bridge without a sugar daddy of epic proportions.

    The uncompetitiveness of the Premiership is a cumulative function of its original structure; with rewards for clubs being graded from top to bottom. The further influence of European money has created an all but invisible cliff edge between those top clubs who regularly make Europe and those who don’t.”

    Which fits with this from Kuper…

    “From 1997 through 2004, United topped the consultancy Deloitte’s “rich list” of European football clubs ranked by revenues. In 2012-13, United dropped out of the top three for the first time since Deloitte began compiling the list.”

    The invisible cliff is visible to everyone below it and is ignored by those above it… There is a time pressure on Utd now that means they have to regain success in order for the model of excellence to stay in place…

    Go to comment

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